A Sort of April-Weather Life

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With the two Herschel 400 lists finished and my notes submitted to the Astronomical League, I had an array of options ahead of me as far as observing projects go. I also had a plethora of telescopes to use in accomplishing whatever goals I set; given my interest in using all of the scopes in my possession (and the EAS library scopes I’m fostering in my garage), it was useful to come up with an observing plan for the rest of the year.

One of my major goals in life has been to become a writer of astronomy books, and my work on the Herschel 400 and HII programs was a terrific foundation—each set of notes was over 250 pages complete, and that was only the notes taken with the 12.5″ scope (Bob the Dob). I had a number of other common-size scopes that I could take notes with—why not use them, for the purpose of writing a comprehensive, multi-aperture guide to observing the Herschel 400 and Herschel II? I could use my 70mm TV Pronto, my (new to me) 4″ f/15 Unitron refractor, and my 8″ Celestron SCT to take notes on those objects in the two primary Herschel lists for the sake of comparison, so that every time those scopes came out for observing, I had a ready-made agenda. This could potentially yield an ultimate guide to observing the Herschel 400 and HII lists… something worth buying. (As I write this, UPS has just delivered a copy of the Cambridge Atlas of Herschel Objects for use in tracking down “the last 1600+”.)

For Bob the Dob, the agenda would be simpler. The remaining 1600+ objects discovered by William Herschel were mostly galaxies, best visible in spring and autumn, so observing with that scope during those seasons would allow me to continue through Herschel’s remaining discoveries; those objects too faint or difficult for the 12.5″ scope could be swept up with the 20″ Obsession. In the summer and winter, Bob the Dob could be used to continue work on the Astronomical League’s Open Cluster program, which I’d essentially started while plowing through the H400/HII. (Or perhaps once I get my old 13.1″ Coulter better tuned-up, I could use it on the open clusters.)

For the 20″ Obsession, I also had a seasonal agenda—flat galaxies in spring and autumn, the AL’s Planetary Nebula program for summer and winter. I had intended to use the 12.5″ scope to wrangle the planetaries, but with so many “obscure” (i.e. non-NGC) targets on the list—Abells, Minkowskis, Wrays, etc.—the extra aperture of the Obsession would be a great advantage. I’d also be able to use the Obsession to pick up the remaining globular clusters I needed from the Northern Hemisphere: Palomars 1-5 and 13-15, plus all of the Terzans aside from Terzan 7, and whatever remaining non-NGC globulars there were after the Palomars and Terzans I still needed.

I. April brought with it several good observing nights, the first of which was the night of the 13th. Still fresh off of conquering the two AL Herschel programs, and hoping to use one of my less-used scopes, I hauled my 8″ SCT out to Eureka Ridge to work through some of the early spring Herschel 400 objects and start testing my scope and the claims that all of the H400 could be seen in an 8″ scope. (I had no doubt that they could—Jay Reynolds Freeman had seen them all in a 55mm refractor—but I wanted good notes on them, and wanted to observe them in the 8″ with my own eyes for proof.)

April also brought with it the COVID-19 lockdown, and though three of us came out to observe, we more than kept our distance. It was just as well; I started feeling a bit rocky as the evening went on, and packed it in two whole hours before Moonrise. I did manage a productive night, though, taking notes on M48 and NGCs 2811, 2652, 3115, 2775, 3166, 3169, 4027, 4038/39, and 3962, despite having to completely re-learn how to use an equatorial mount (after years of non-stop alt-az mounts).  It was something of a joy to use my first scope on objects in constellations like Crater; my memories of using that telescope are so intertwined with my observing life in Cincinnati that the idea of using it at a dark site (even though we only hit 21.37 on the SQM) had been somewhat unthinkable. I came away from the evening with a new appreciation for the old scope, and for what an 8″ aperture could do when the sky was good enough.

II. I skipped the next couple of nights to watch my health, and to make sure I didn’t have anything that could be passed on to anyone else. But I felt fine the next day and the several after that, so—having monitored temperature and cough and other symptoms—I was ready to go three nights later, still keeping well away from the others on the observing field.

My agenda for the night was nothing less than the Herschel Sprint, which I’d already attempted on a March night in 2016 (see here). It was almost 235 years to the day since William Herschel had had his epic night of discovery, sweeping up 74 previously-undiscovered galaxies in Ursa Major, Leo, Leo Minor, Coma Berenices, Canes Venatici, and Corona Borealis (the latter most appropriate for the current times). Rather than working on his remaining objects—and having several nights of good forecast upcoming—I decided to try the Sprint again, having been foiled by Moonrise back in 2016.

I was about thirty objects in before my feet began to give up the ghost. I was halfway into two months of physical therapy—along with getting a set of custom orthotics (which I didn’t actually get until May) and a high-strength prescription anti-inflammatory—to bring the pain in my feet under control, but that wasn’t enough to alleviate the effects of standing for five straight hours on uneven rocky ground. And standing was necessary; the declination band in which the Sprint targets resided was just high enough that I couldn’t use my observing chair at all. Even with several breaks to sit, I couldn’t plow through it. I ended up with brief notes on about fifty of the 74 objects before dejectedly calling it a night.

III. My feet recovered enough for me to venture out the next night. I was smarter this time; my agenda consisted of working through “The Remaining 1600+” with the 12.5″ scope, and I deliberately chose targets that would allow me to sit down to observe. The majority (if not all ) of these were from T.C. Hoffelder’s informal selection of the Herschel III objects. With only three of us in the small Eureka clearing, there was plenty of room for social distancing, and the weather held until it didn’t.

We were also treated to an impressive display of Elon’s Folly going overhead, starting nearly at the zenith and gradually working west as they arced above us.

04/17/20 
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 8:00 PM
MOON: 24 days (rose at 4:37 AM; 27% illuminated)
SEEING: 7
TRANSPARENCY: 7-5
SQM: 21.4
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to upper 30s; no dew; chilly but tolerable; clouds gradually took over the sky starting 11:00; wind grew increasingly stronger on observing field
OTHERS PRESENT: DB, LR

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted 

9:33
NGC 2507 (Cnc): This is not a bad little galaxy. It’s round, about 1.0’ diameter, with a fairly diffuse outer halo that’s not particularly well defined, a 0.3’ core that’s not much brighter than the halo and is gradually arrived at, and a faint stellar nucleus. SP the galaxy by 1.3’ is a 12th-magnitude star; that star looks like it has something SP it—probably a faint double (or a small galaxy?); the P-most of the double/pair is holdable in direct vision, but the F-most is at threshold level; the two components are 20” apart [there are many of Elon’s Folly going overhead at the moment; I went to confirm M89/M90 for Loren]. F slightly S of the galaxy by 6’ is a 9th-magnitude star that’s the S-most vertex of a right triangle; 4.25’ F very slightly N of that star is the triangle’s right-angle vertex, which is 10th magnitude; 7’ N from the first vertex is the third vertex, which is 11th magnitude.

10:00
NGC 2545 (Cnc): Much more difficult than NGC 2507, this is a faintish N-S streak. It has a very very faint substellar nucleus, but only a slight bit of central concentration along the major axis. The galaxy spans 1.0’ x 0.3’. It looks as if, just outside the N end of the halo, is a threshold (or perhaps 14.5-magnitude) star. The halo is pretty diffuse and not at all well defined. The galaxy is faint enough that it’s hard to get a good reading on its dimensions; in averted, it reaches maybe 1.25’ x 0.5’. Due P the galaxy by 4’ is a 9.5- magnitude star that’s the S-most vertex of a right triangle; the right-angle vertex is NP that star by 3.5’ and is 11.5 magnitude; 3’ due NF the right-angle vertex is another 11.5-magnitude star. 3.75’ N very slightly F the galaxy is a 12.5-magnitude star with a 14th-magnitude star 1’ F very very slightly N. From the galaxy 8’ F slightly N is a 9.5-magnitude star with a 10.5-magnitude star 1.67’ N very very slightly F it. The brightest star in the field is 19’ S somewhat F the galaxy and is 8th magnitude.

The Clear Sky Chart called it right on the money—we’d be getting cirrus crud passing through sporadically, lowering the transparency throughout the evening. The cirrus brought with it increasing winds, making the temperature more uncomfortable than it would’ve been in still ambient air.

10:15
NGC 2608 (Cnc): Not a scintillating galaxy but certainly noticeable at first glance in the field (it doesn’t help that there’s transparency crud coming in from the north). The galaxy is elongated roughly P-F and spans 1.0’ x 0.3’. Its halo is quite diffuse and poorly defined; it also has a very, very slightly brighter core and extremely faint stellar nucleus that pops out only infrequently. The galaxy has a couple of 14.5-magnitude/threshold stars around it that interfere with the observation; a couple lie to the N very slightly P and N very slightly F, with one SP the galaxy by 2’, and these are all very faint in the current conditions. P very very slightly S of the galaxy by 9’ is an 8.5-magnitude star.  S of the galaxy by 5’ is a 13th– magnitude star that has 1.25’ P very very slightly N of it an 11.5-magnitude star; due F the galaxy by 5’ is a 13th-magnitude star. The brightest star in the field is NF the galaxy by 20’ and is 8thmagnitude; it’s the N-most vertex of a flat isosceles triangle that has a 12.5-magnitude star S somewhat P it by 4’ and a 12th-magnitude star 2.5’ P somewhat S of it.

10:27
NGC 2672 (Cnc): This little guy is not far from the Beehive Cluster. It’s not a particularly impressive specimen, but it’s fairly obvious in the field. It forms the F-most vertex of an isosceles triangle, and is itself in the middle of a triangle of very faint stars. The galaxy is elongated slightly P very slightly N-F very slightly S, 0.75’ x 0.5’; it has a small brighter core and a substellar nucleus. The core seems a little offset to the P end? This may be partly because of a threshold star just outside the F very very slightly S end of the halo [this is actually a companion galaxy, NGC 2673]. There are two 14th-magnitude stars to the N; one is N very very slightly F by 1.67’ and the other is P somewhat N by 2.5’. The galaxy is the F-most vertex in the isosceles triangle; P the galaxy by 7’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star 5’ P somewhat S of the galaxy. The brightest star in the field is 9th magnitude and lies NF the galaxy by 17’. The galaxy suddenly looks better; there may be more waves of crud passing through. In the better conditions, the galaxy may be 1.25’ x 0.75’. F somewhat S of the galaxy by 25’ (so outside the field) is a 6.5-magnitude star.

10:38
NGC  2718 (Hya): I just happened to land right on this one while searching. It’s a pretty well-defined little galaxy, elongated NP-SF, 0.75’ x 0.3’; there’s no sense that it’s bigger, even in averted vision. It has only a very slight bit of central brightening; I can’t tell if there’s a nucleus (don’t think so). It also has around it, within a 4’ radius, a bunch of very very faint stars: maybe three to due P, NP, N very slightly F, and two S that are very very slightly brighter, especially the one to the S very very slightly F of the galaxy; I can hold the two to the S in direct vision but not the others; these faint stars form a stretched pentagon around the galaxy, but it’s difficult to hold all of them steady at the same time. F the galaxy by 4.75’ is an 11th-magnitude star that has a 13th-magnitude star due N of it by 1.75’; from the brighter of this pair 7’ F somewhat N is the brightest star in the field, which is 8.5 magnitude.

10:50
NGC 2967 (Sex): This galaxy is a diffuse, round, very weakly concentrated glow, no more than 1.5’ diameter. It has a very slightly brighter largish core, but no trace of a nucleus… a face-on spiral? It’s impressively large for a HIII galaxy. Due N of the galaxy by 3.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star that has F very very slightly N of it by 3.5’ a 13.5-magnitude star [the wind is roaring in the background!]. From the galaxy N slightly F by 10’ is an 11th-magnitude star. The brightest star in the field is P somewhat N of the galaxy by 12’ and is double: 8.5- and 11th-magnitude stars with the brighter S very slightly F the fainter; the pair has 9’ N very very slightly F it a 10th-magnitude star that has NF of it by 2.75’ a 12.5-magnitude star. It’s a pretty barren field star-wise; the two bright ones to the P (the last group) are part of a larger concentration of bright stars, most of which are outside the field.

11:03
NGC 3044 (Hya): This one is not bright but it’s very impressive—a great one! It’s definitely a flat galaxy [wind is a real problem now]. It’s 4.0’ x very very thin, maybe 0.25’? 0.3’? The galaxy is quite ghostly and not particularly well defined, especially on the P end. It’s elongated P very slightly N-F very slightly S. [I’m having to hold on to the scope now because of the wind.] There’s very subtle major axis brightening along the galaxy’s inner 2/3, but nothing definable as a nucleus. I didn’t see it at first in the field because I was looking for something smaller/rounder. N of the P tip of the galaxy, 2.75’ from center, is a 15th-magnitude star. S very very slightly F by 4.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star that has due N of it by 1.75’ another 13.5-magnitude star. NP the galaxy by 6’ is the brighter of a pair: that star is 12thmagnitude and it has a 13.5-magnitude star S very very slightly P it by 0.5’, and also has an 11.5-magnitude star P slightly S of it by 2.5’. The brightest star in the field is N somewhat F the galaxy by 15’ and is a 10th-magnitude star that has a 14th-magnitude star P very slightly N of it by 0.5’. N somewhat F the galaxy by 5.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star. Must return to this one, possibly often!

3044 being an excellent object to end on, and the clouds and wind conspiring to make the conditions useless for observing, I called it a night. 

IV. April’s observing run ended a night later with the 20″ Obsession and a run into the Flat Galaxies Catalogue.

According to Karachentsev et al (1993), flat galaxies “are defined as having a diameter larger than 40 arc-seconds and a major to minor axis ratio of >= 7” and “there is a tight correlation between their linear diameter and the width of the 21cm line that can be detected.” Flat Galaxies are therefore used “to study large‐scale cosmic streamings and other problems of observational cosmology” because “a) the HI 21 cm and Hα line detection rate of these galaxies is nearly 100%; b) the flat galaxies avoid volumes occupied by groups and clusters so that their structure remains undisturbed and they are not affected by large virial motions.” Objects in the Revised Flat Galaxies Catalogue are considered to be typologically homogenous and are therefore suitable as a uniform group for study.

Visually, of course, flat galaxies are far from uniform, despite being of roughly-similar shape. Surface brightness, core/nucleus visibility, and size are only a few of the variable factors in the visual appearance of these slivers of light; even a photograph can’t provide an adequate guesstimate as to how a flat galaxy will appear in an eyepiece. (Of course, this is true to some extent of all galaxies and even nebulae; only open clusters and some globulars may be truly represented by a photograph.) The only way to know is to actually look. And so look I did.

04/19-04/20/20 
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 8:00 PM
MOON: 24 days (rose at 4:37 AM; 27% illuminated)
SEEING: 7-9
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.5
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to 43F; no dew; temps moderate; high winds beyond treeline
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DB, LR

All observations: 20″ f/5 Obsession truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (181x, 0.45˚ TFoV) and 7mm Nagler (363x, 12.6’ TFoV) unless otherwise noted

10:08
IC 2233 (Lyn): A razor-thin galaxy, elongated N very very slightly P-S very very slightly F [PA 170˚]; it’s currently pretty low in the sky, so it’s not at its best; it’s still fairly obvious, but averted vision does wonders for it. It extends 2.5’ x 0.3’, and has a 13th-magnitude star on its N end that’s very very distracting. There’s some evidence of an actual core (in opposition to the standard major-axis brightening you’d get in an edge-on), especially in averted vision there’s a 0.3’ long core. There’s no nucleus to speak of. The core and the star on the N end form an equilateral triangle with a 10th-magnitude star that’s F the galaxy by 1’; that star has a 14th-magnitude star NF it by 0.25’. P the galaxy by 5’ is another 10th-magnitude star. (The scope needs more cooling; seeing has been good so far, but it’s still not where it needs to be.) The two 10th-magnitude stars P and F the galaxy from a large parallelogram with two others well to the S, including a 9.5-magnitude star that’s 11’ S very slightly F the galaxy; this parallelogram runs roughly parallel to the galaxy (N very slightly P-S very slightly F).

10:21
NGC 2537 (Lyn): The Bear Paw Galaxy, as impressive as only a 20” can make it: the galaxy looks almost like a planetary nebula at first glance due to the inner detail/morphology. Much of this detail needs averted vision for a good view, but it’s unmistakable; the arc around the N edge from P-F and the segment from the middle to the S edge are both well evident. It’s a round galaxy, diffuse on the edges, reasonably well defined but with an outer fringe that fades out like a planetary nebula halo. The galaxy is 1.75’ round. On the NsP there’s either a star or a brightish stellaring within the halo along that brighter rim that runs across N half of the galaxy; that part of the internal structure is brighter than the center-S strip (I probably need more magnification for a good view). F slightly S of the galaxy by 2’ is an 11th-magnitude star; F very slightly N of the galaxy by 1.25’ is a 14.5-magnitude star. 7’ P the galaxy is an 8.5-magnitude star. The two stars to the F form an isosceles triangle with the galaxy; the galaxy marks the SP vertex and then 12’ N slightly P the galaxy is a 9.5-magnitude star; 7’ N somewhat P the galaxy is an 11.5-magnitude star, and that star and the 8.5-magnitude star P the galaxy also form an equilateral triangle with the galaxy as the SF vertex.

10:41
IC 2461 (Lyn): This flat galaxy is much smaller than IC 2233: 1.5’ x less than 1/8’, with due NP-SF orientation [PA 135˚]. It’s brighter than IC 2233, but also doesn’t have the bright star on the edge complicating things that 2233 has. It’s pretty well defined, and the whole thing visible in direct vision (unlike many flat galaxies); averted only brightens it, rather than making its fainter edges seem larger. There’s no notable core but it has a semi-substellar nucleus. SP the galaxy by 3’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; S slightly P by 4.5’ is a 9.5-magnitude star, and there’s a 10.5-magnitude star S very very slightly P the galaxy by 4.75’. S very very slightly P the galaxy by 14’ is an 8.5-magnitude star that’s the brightest in the field (it’s actually just outside the field); that star is at the F end of a line of three that get gradually fainter as they run P-ward, and this line is 5’ long. I’m changing eyepieces to the 7mm Nagler (363x, 12.6’ TFoV): the nuclear region actually contains a very small, tentative core (?). There seems to be a flash of nucleus too. A 16th-magnitude star lies SP the galaxy by 1’. The extra magnification of the Nagler helps bring the galaxy out of the background.

One of the difficulties of working through the flat galaxy list is that—after spending some considerable time tracking some of the galaxies down—the target may not be worth the time it took to find it (at least as far as notetaking goes). Being able to sit beside the scope and take notes on a marginally-visible object is a lot more comfortable than taking notes on such a barely-there galaxy while standing on a ladder, and some of the galaxies I observed on this particular night simply didn’t offer enough at the eyepiece to justify taking notes on them (given that the Obsession’s secondary mirror was later found to have dewed over entirely, some of those galaxies I passed on might be worth a revisit). While I might normally be thrilled to take notes on an obscure threshold-level object, I’d also rather pick a better subject when one presented itself. All of this is to say that the long gaps between notes here were the result of looking at some extremely-tenuous sliver of vapor in the eyepiece and saying, “Hmmm… maybe another time. Next.”

11:34
UGC 5495 (Leo): This is a fairly well-defined little streak, but I had to get the bright star out of the field for a good view. The galaxy is elongated P very very very slightly N-F very very very slightly S [PA 95˚] and spans 1.25’ x 0.125’. It does have a somewhat-brighter nuclear region with perhaps a very tricky stellar nucleus visible in averted vision. N of the galaxy by 9’ is a 13th-magnitude star; N very very slightly F the galaxy by 3.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star, and there are a few other faint ones nearby. S somewhat F by 8’ is an 8.5-magnitude star that has a 10.5-magnitude star S of it by 3’ and from the 8.5-magnitude star NP by 1.25’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. With the 7mm Nagler: there may not be a nucleus but a very small core instead; I’m not getting a sense even in averted vision that there’s a nucleus there. The 8.5-magnitude star SF the galaxy is a nearly-equal double in 7mm that wasn’t splittable in the 14mm (except with great concentration, and only having seen it in the 7mm first).

Dan and Loren both left by this point; only Jerry and I remained to observe. But the skies were still fine, and there were dozens of further targets on my list.

12:19
NGC 3279 (Leo): I had a couple of really tough ones after UGC 5495 that I didn’t want to record—marginal sightings at best [due in part to the Obsession’s secondary having completely dewed over by this point, unbeknownst to me). This galaxy is just N of Rho Leonis and is quite excellent. It’s elongated N slightly P-S slightly F [PA 150˚] and not super-bright, certainly not as bright as I expected for an NGC object (even one on the Flat Galaxy list). It subtends 2.25’ x 0.3’, and doesn’t have much central concentration, but it is somewhat mottled or irregularly bright. Every now and then there’s a flash of a nucleus, but it’s impossible to hold steady even in averted vision. Due N of the galaxy by 3.5’ is a 10.5-magnitude star, and there’s a 13.5-magnitude star P very very slightly N of the galaxy by 2.25’; S of that star by 0.3’ is a 15th-magnitude star. F the galaxy by 2.75’ is a 14.5-magnitude star. In the 7mm, the galaxy still appears mottled, but there’s still no sign of a nucleus, or even a core. N of the galaxy by 1.5’ is a 16th-magnitude star.

12:50
NGC 3196 (Leo): The only reason I’ve tracked down this otherwise-nondescript little blur is because it’s the lead-off object for the Herschel Sprint, and was not visible in my 12.5” scope on either of my attempts at the Sprint. It took a long lot of starhopping to get to, and finally required the 7mm Nagler (again, though, I wasn’t aware that the secondary mirror was completely fogged). The galaxy lies due P a 15th-magnitude star and can be seen in direct vision, but there’s not much to see: it’s a tiny spot, no bigger than 0.25’ diameter, with either a very small (5”) core or a substellar nucleus.

As usual, we didn’t just look at the listed objects; we also observed some of the major galaxies of spring (M51, M101, NGC 4565 [which is also a flat galaxy], and NGC 4051, one of the ones in Ursa Major that I was impressed with in my last Herschel run]). It was while observing M101 that I discovered that the Obsession’s secondary mirror had fogged over, contributing to the difficulty of some of my galaxy observations—with as wet as the mirror was, it had been fogged for some time. The scope itself wasn’t too wet, which had perhaps fooled me into thinking it wasn’t so dewy at the site.

Jerry and I spent another half hour looking at the showpiece galaxies and the two great early-summer globulars, M13 and M5, before conceding the night—and the end of the Moon-dark phase—to the dew and the wildlife. It was the last clear Moon-dark night until the end of May, and the last time since that I’ve been able to gather starlight and the glow of distant galaxies.

 

Tell the Moon Dog; Tell the March Hare

I began 2020 with low expectations of getting the Herschel I and II lists completed during the year; there were simply too many low-south winter objects in Monoceros, Canis Major, and Puppis to get to—and the Willamette Valley winters were usually too cloudy—to expect to observe all of the targets I needed within three months’ time (not to mention the forty-plus galaxies I needed to catch in Camelopardalis and Ursa Major). But after the clear, Moonless run we received unexpectedly in February, I was suddenly staring down the homestretch of a six-year project, with only a sizable fraction of the Ursa Major galaxies (and a few scattered galaxies in other constellations) remaining. The nearly-impossible had become very probable, even likely.

I. And so the first clear, dark night of March beckoned, calling the dedicated to the observing field. COVID-19 hadn’t quite yet become a factor; social distancing essentially meant “give me room to swing my telescope 360 degrees.” Although, as it turned out, only three of us made it to Eureka Ridge—which became our default site due to its easy accessibility and larger observing area.

03/12/20 
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 7:16 PM
MOON: 19 days (rose at 11:21 PM; 83% illuminated)
SEEING: 7-9
TRANSPARENCY: 6-5
SQM: 21.37 (looked worse)
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to mid 30s; not much dew; quite chilly; some haze passing through from N; no wind intruding on field; high clouds visible near Moon when it rose
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, FS

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

8:51
NGC 3225 (UMa): I’m starting this last Herschel-oriented run with a fairly mediocre one: a considerably-faint, N slightly P-S slightly F elongated galaxy (in fairness, it’s probably not totally dark yet). It would be easy to pass over the galaxy at first glance; there are a couple of faint but noticeable stars to NF and N that pull the eye away from the galaxy. The galaxy is no more than 0.75’ x 0.3’, with not much central concentration or brightening; it’s not evenly bright, but still tricky to pick out the core from the halo, and there’s a 14.5-magnitude star 1’ NF the galaxy that makes it tough to tell if there’s a nucleus there; the star and the galaxy blur together in averted vision. Even with more searching, I’m not picking up a nucleus at all. The halo is not particularly well defined. The galaxy has a number of faint stars around it: S very slightly F by 5’ is a 14th-magnitude star, and there’s a 13.5-magnitude star 5’ SP; the galaxy forms the N vertex of a roughly equilateral triangle with those two stars. 4.75’ N of the galaxy is a 13.5-magnitude star. Due N of the galaxy by 11’ is the SP vertex of a squashed trapezoid; that vertex is magnitude 12.5 and it has NP it by 2’ an 11.5-magnitude star; there’s a star of 11th magnitude F the first star by 3.5’ and from the 11th-magnitude star 2.25’ NF is one of 12th magnitude. 19’ N somewhat P the galaxy is the brightest star in the field at magnitude 8.5; there’s a star just slightly fainter than that (magnitude 8.75) 22’ P very very slightly S of the galaxy.


9:04
NGC 3310 (UMa): Between the Dipper Bowl and the hind foot of UMa for this round, much-brighter galaxy, which unfortunately shares the field with a considerably- bright star. The galaxy is 1.5’ across, although in averted vision it may have a slight bit of N-S elongation. It almost looks like a planetary nebula, with the bright core and stellar nucleus; I want to reach for the O-III filter to increase the contrast. The galaxy’s outer halo is not particularly well defined, but the core is; the core is pretty suddenly brighter, and a nucleus is obvious. The galaxy is the S-most vertex of an isosceles triangle whose NP and NF vertices are 4.75’ from the galaxy; the NP vertex is 12.5 magnitude; the NF vertex is 13.5 magnitude, and N of the galaxy by 3’ is a 12th-magnitude star; that last star is in the middle of the N edge of the triangle but just S of that line. The problem here is the 6th-magnitude star N slightly F the galaxy by 11’; this disrupts the observing of the galaxy even at that distance. There’s also a 9th-magnitude star S slightly P the galaxy by 19’, and F slightly N of the galaxy by 21’ is a 7.5-magnitude star. P very very slightly N of the galaxy by 12’ is a 10th-magnitude star.

9:17
NGC 3359
(UMa): This is a much larger galaxy than the previous ones, but also more diffuse and ghostly. It’s not as obvious as 3310 but quite a bit bigger; they’re probably equal mag, but 3359 has lower surface brightness. It’s clearly a face-on spiral, but I’m also picking up what looks like a N-S bar, much more definite at some moments than at others. The galaxy is elongated N-S, 3.0’ x 1.3’, and is extremely diffuse; it has either a very small core or a large substellar nucleus (I think it’s a core and not nucleus, a very very small brighter core). The halo is not well defined; I can see that there’s the bar; the halo is definitely irregularly bright, but there’s no real sense of spiral arms. [A bright satellite cuts right through the galaxy, moving N-S.] The galaxy has a number of threshold stars around it: SF the galaxy by 3’ and P slightly N of it by 3.3’ are 14.5-magnitude stars; S very slightly F by 4.25’ is another of 14.5 magnitude. [Another satellite passes by, NF-SP.] 11’ SP is an 11.5-magnitude star that’s the right-angle vertex of a good-sized right triangle; P very slightly S of it by 4.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star; NP the right-angle vertex by 6’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; the right-angle vertex also has 8’ S somewhat P a 10th-magnitude star that’s the brightest in the field. F slightly N of the galaxy by 8’ is a 12th-magnitude star that has one of 11.5 magnitude F by 1.25’. This is a really cool galaxy that deserves higher magnification and bigger aperture to appreciate!

9:34
NGC 3516 (UMa): An underwhelming object, one of only a few so far in Ursa Major. [Its overall appearance may not be impressive, but it’s a galaxy, anyway–all galaxies are impressive, regardless of how they look.] This is a small, probably elliptical, galaxy in a fairly-sparse field. It’s round, with maybe a tiny bit of N-S elongation, and no more than 0.75’ (maybe 0.75’ x 0.67’, if the elongation is not a figment of my imagination or the atmospheric conditions.) It has a notable and well-defined core that’s 0.3’ diameter, and an obvious bright nucleus that’s not quite stellar. The halo isn’t particularly well defined. A few brightish stars bracket the galaxy: NF by 2.25’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star P slightly N of the galaxy by 4.25’; SF by 1’ is a 14.5-magnitude star, and there’s one of 13.5 magnitude 2.25’ NP the galaxy. 11’ S of the galaxy is the N-most of a pair: this could be a legit double, 13th- and 12th-magnitude stars separated N-S by 0.3’, with the fainter to the N; these two form the NP vertex of a nice isosceles triangle; due F the pair by 2.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; there’s a 12.5-magnitude star S slightly P that second star by 3.75’ that’s the “point” star of the triangle, and it has 1.25’ NF it a 14th-magnitude star. The brightest star in the field is the 10.5-magnitude star NF the galaxy; the second-brightest is among a group of stars to the SP, running SP-NF along the SP edge of the field; this comprises a four-star triangle with a broken ellipse SP it; the brightest star in the triangle is a 10.5-magnitude star that’s the F-most and closest to the galaxy, 14’ P somewhat S of the galaxy that has SP it by 6’ another 10.5-magnitude star that’s the brightest in the ellipse and on its N edge (these last two 10.5-magnitude stars are very slightly fainter than the one NF the galaxy).


The Clear Sky Chart had indicated that we’d be losing our transparency about 11 PM; it was actually off by an hour, at least visibly—the northern sky had begun to haze over in and around the Eugene skyglow (which was why the haze was noticeable in the first place).  Because galaxies tend to suffer more than any other type of object in poor transparency, I was probably going to be finishing up even before Moonrise tonight. Within a half-hour, the effects of the haze were well apparent in the eyepiece.

9:50
NGC 3622 (UMa): Even more underwhelming than 3516, this one is also hampered by being 10’ N very very slightly P the brightest star in the field, which is 6.5 magnitude and bluish (it may also be suffering from bad transparency at the moment). This is a small galaxy, only 0.75’ x 0.5’ and elongated N-S. It’s reasonably well defined; there’s no sense that it has more halo than is currently visible in direct vision, nor is there much central concentration. Averted vision may show a flash of a nucleus but it’s impossible to hold. The view of the galaxy is also hampered by it being in the SP end of an almost-equilateral triangle of faintish stars: S very slightly F by 1.5’ is a 14th-magnitude star; NP the galaxy by 4.25’ is another of 14th magnitude, and a 12.5-magnitude star lies NF the galaxy by 5.5’. The star to the NF also has a 14.5-magnitude star 1.5’ P very very slightly N of it. [A bright satellite cuts NF-SP through the field.] The 6.5-magnitude star has a 13.5-magnitude star P very very slightly N of it by 1.67’; S very very slightly P it by 1.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star that has F very very slightly N of it by 0.67’ a 13.5-magnitude star, and from the 6.5-magnitude star P by 5.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star. From the galaxy 12’ due SP is a 12.5-magnitude star that has a 9.5-magnitude star 0.75’ P very very slightly S of it.


10:05
NGC 3668 (UMa): This galaxy is at least a better one than 3622, but it’s certainly not spectacular. It’s smallish and diffuse, with a low surface brightness halo and a small unconcentrated core that’s hard to distinguish from the halo. It nonetheless has some “heft” to it; it’s 1.0’ x 0.67’ and elongated NP-SF. The halo is very diffuse and poorly defined. The galaxy forms a little triangle with a 10th-magnitude star SP it by 2.75’; N very very slightly F that star by 1.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star that’s due P the galaxy by 1.75’; the 10th-magnitude star also forms the SF end of a capital ‘T’ with a 12th-magnitude star that’s P slightly N the 10th-magnitude star by 5’ and an 11.5-magnitude star NP the 12th-magnitude star by 4.5’; these form the top of the ‘T’. From the middle star S by 2.75’ is one of 12.5 magnitude, and from that star S slightly P by 5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; so the vertical bar of the ‘T’ is bent/not perfectly straight. From the galaxy 7’ almost due S is the brighter of a pair, a 13.5-magnitude star with a 14.5-magnitude star S very very slightly F it by 0.5’; from that 13.5-magnitude star S very slightly P by 5.5’ is a 10th-magnitude star, and from that 10th-magnitude star 9’ S is an 8th-magnitude star. From the galaxy 25’ F very slightly N is a 7.5-magnitude star; from the galaxy N slightly F by 9’ is a 12th-magnitude star with an 11.5-magnitude star 7’ NF it.

10:19
NGC 3945 (UMa): Losing the N to transparency issues, so it won’t be too long before I have to shut things down for the night (Moonrise is coming up, too, so that’ll be that). This galaxy is small (1.25’ across) but brightish. It has a bright core that spans 0.5’ and perhaps comes to a fleeting stellar nucleus. The halo isn’t particularly well defined. The field is quite active. SP the galaxy by 1.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s a 14th-magnitude star SF that star by 0.67’, and the 14th-magnitude is also S very very slightly P the galaxy by 1.25’. NP the galaxy by 1.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star. SF the galaxy by 7’ is a 13.5-magnitude star that’s the NF end of a line of three; it has a 13th-magnitude star SP it by 2.5’, and there’s a 13.5-magnitude star SP that star by 2.5’. F the galaxy by 8’ is a 10.5-magnitude star that has an 11.5-magnitude star 1.75’ P slightly S of it. The brightest star in the field is 20’ SF the galaxy and is 10th magnitude; 20’ S slightly P the galaxy is another very slightly fainter (magnitude 10.5) that has a 14th-magnitude star SP it by 0.5’. 19’ N of the galaxy is the brighter of a pair: these are 10.5 and 11.5 magnitude, with the fainter N very very slightly F the brighter by 10”; F very slightly N the brighter of that pair by 12’ is a 9th-magnitude star.


10:40
NGCs 4036, 4041 (UMa): A fine, more-impressive pair here. NGC 4036 is a nice but undetailed (at first glance) edge-on spiral. It’s elongated P-F, 2.5’ x 0.67’. The galaxy has the typical edge-on galaxy central brightening along its major axis but also a distinct nuclear bulge and a bright not-quite-stellar nucleus. The ends of the halo are very very poorly defined but the N and S edges are much better; the N edge appears as if the light is cut off by a dust lane–it seems as if just F the nuclear bulge is a thin perpendicular N-S slight dimming as if there’s something obscuring on the F side of the bulge. S of the galaxy by 9.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star with a 12th-magnitude star 4’ SP it; SP the galaxy by 4.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; there’s another of 13.5 magnitude SF the galaxy by 7’. N very very slightly P the galaxy by 5’ is a 14th-magnitude star; there’s another 14th-magnitude star 3.5’ NP the galaxy. F very slightly N of the galaxy by 10’ is a 10th-magnitude star. 8.5’ P slightly N of the galaxy is an 11th-magnitude star; from that star 2.25’ N very very slightly P is another of 10th magnitude. (The impression of the gap F the nucleus may be because of an embedded star on that side of the nucleus.) N slightly F the galaxy by 11’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. NF that star by 5.5’ is NGC 4041, a smaller, rounder, much more diffuse galaxy, 1.5’ in diameter, with a brighter core that seems offset to the F a little; the core isn’t quite centered, or the halo extends P somewhat. The halo is quite diffuse and poorly defined, so finding the galaxy’s center is not easy; I’m not sure there’s a nucleus either. SF the galaxy (4041) by 4’ is a 13.5-magnitude star with one of 14th magnitude due P it by 1’; N very slightly F the galaxy by 8’ is a 12th-magnitude star with a 13.5-magnitude star 1.25’ SF it.


Apparently the haze wasn’t a problem in other parts of the sky, or with the seeing; Jerry  noted that he had just split an 0.8” double somewhere near the meridian to the south. I had noticed how rock-steady the seeing had become, without actually realizing it; transparency usually mattered more to me as a criteria, simply because of its effects on galaxy observing. But the transparency had also improved somewhat after the first wave of sky-crud had passed through.

10:58
NGCs 3583, 3577 (UMa): The seeing is very good now and the transparency’s better, although part of this is that Ursa Major has risen above the Eugene light dome. I have NGC 3583 labeled with a Post-It arrow on
Sky Atlas 2000.0, but it’s not on my SkySafari list so I don’t don’t know if it’s actually a Herschel 400/II object; for the sake of CMA, I’m going to include it. It’s an interesting galaxy, elongated roughly P-F, but the halo seems “tilted” against the core; maybe it’s a barred spiral and I’m seeing the bar as a core? The halo extends NP-SF but the core runs P-F. The galaxy spans 1.25’ x 0.75’, with a very bright elongated core and a stellar nucleus that requires averted to hold; there’s another galaxy in the field, but it’s much smaller and fainter. The galaxies lie in a very fine field of stars, most of which run in a SP-NF stream and are lumped in pairs. 5.5’ SF NGC 3583 is a 9.5-magnitude star; NF the galaxy by 7’ is a 10th-magnitude star with an 11th-magnitude star NF it by 3’. F very very slightly S of the galaxy by 5.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. N very slightly F the galaxy by 4.75’ is a 12.5-magnitude star with a 13th-magnitude star due P it by 1.5’. SP the galaxy by 5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; just NP that star by 1.25’ is a really tiny fuzzy round spot (NGC 3577) that’s only 0.3’ diameter, with no central concentration; it’s very hard to hold in direct vision but pops out well in averted. NGC 3583 and that semi-triangle around it are set within a larger triangle of stars: S somewhat P the galaxy by 15’ is a 9.5-magnitude star with one of 11th magnitude P it by 3’; NF the galaxy by 19’ is a 9.5-magnitude star that has an 11.5-magnitude star 1.75’ SP it; SF the galaxy by 20’ is a 9th-magnitude star that’s the brightest star in the field, and it has due F it by 2.25’ a 10th-magnitude star. This is an interesting galaxy pair deserving a bigger scope and higher magnification.

11:13
NGCs 3769, 3769A (UMa): This is the last one for the night due to Moonrise. NGC 3769 is another interesting spiral, located S of the Dipper. It appears in averted vision to be part of an interacting pair with a much much smaller galaxy not quite perpendicular to it just off the SF end. 3769 is oriented NP-SF and is a pretty impressive object: it subtends 2.0’ x 0.5’, with a somewhat-brighter core and an embedded just-above-threshold star between the core and the NP end. The galaxy is irregularly bright along its major axis; the halo is quite diffuse and irregular in brightness. Off the galaxy’s SF end and extending mostly P-F is a very very faint, diffuse, featureless, unconcentrated glow (3769A) no more than 0.5’ long x 0.125’ wide; this needs averted vision for a decent view, even though I detected it at first in direct vision. The larger galaxy has a 14th-magnitude star 2.25’ NF it; N very slightly P the galaxy by 10’ is a 10.5-magnitude star with another (very very slightly fainter) N slightly P it by 4’. NF the galaxy by 12’ is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s an 11.5-magnitude star F the galaxy by 10’. S of the galaxy by 7’ is a 12.5-magnitude star that’s the F end of an arc of four; this sweeps SP, then due P, then NP, and ends P from where it started and is 8’ end-to-end. P very slightly S of the galaxy by 15’ is the more-S and F of a pair that are both 12th magnitude, with the F one very very slightly fainter; these are separated by 0.67’, and the fainter has a 12.5-magnitude star NF it by 2.75’.

We took a few looks at the Moon before heading home; with its rise, we could also see the extent of the haze to the east. I was surprised at how much gunk had been in the sky, although how long it had been there was hard to gauge. Our next observing session—much closer to New Moon—would have far superior conditions.

Eleven galaxies noted. Only twenty or so left to go in the Herschel 400 and HII lists.

II. We returned to Eureka almost a week later, with a run of clear skies predicted by the weather forecasts and the Clear Sky Chart granting affirmation (at least for the couple of days the CSC predicts).

We had a larger group this time; with the state of Oregon expected to begin enacting stay-at-home orders soon, there may have been a sense of urgency to getting out under the stars. I didn’t feel any urgency in that regard, even though I was close enough to see the finish line of the Herschel programs; I would go out alone if need be to get the work done.

The clearing was abuzz all night with the sounds of astronomy and the humor of a group well at ease under the stars. My first recording began with a comment about Bob Ross chucking his paints and easel and kicking a staffer: “That’s going to be a really confusing way to start my recordings for the night.” And, given that I don’t recall what prompted the comment (and didn’t recall it when I transcribed the notes more than a month ago), it certainly was.

As had often been the case recently, mine was the only telescope pointed toward the north; everyone else was focused on the rich winter Milky Way, now setting, and the rising galaxy fields of Leo, Virgo, and the rest of the incoming spring skies. Somehow, I forgot to hit ‘record’ on my first object, with the result that I had to redo the observation. (Perhaps this led to the Bob Ross reference.)

03/18/20
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 7:23 PM
MOON: 25 days (rose at 4:44 AM; 24% illuminated)
SEEING: 7-8
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.27
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to 32F; some dew after 10:30, became considerable; chilly but tolerable
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, FS, DB, LR, RA

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

8:49
NGC 3949 (UMa): Have to redo this one, as I forgot to hit “record” the first time through. This is a nicely-bright but small galaxy, oriented NP-SF, 1.5’ x just under 1.0’, with a fairly-well defined but diffuse halo and very, very gradual brightening to a stellar nucleus. 13’ SP the galaxy is a 10.5-magnitude star; the galaxy and that star serve to mark the major axis of a long diamond; 8’ P somewhat S of the galaxy is the star at the N end of the minor axis; that star is 12.5 magnitude [a tumbling satellite passed through the field just S of the galaxy, moving SP]; from that star 5’ S very slightly F is a 10.5-magnitude star, and those two make up the diamond’s minor axis, which is oriented P somewhat N-F somewhat S; the galaxy is the NF vertex of the diamond; the final star in the diamond is 5.75’ S very slightly P the galaxy. The galaxy is also the SF vertex of a dim almost-equilateral triangle, with a 13.5-magnitude star 3.25’ P very slightly S and another of 13.5 magnitude 4’ NP the galaxy. Also NP the galaxy by 21’ is a 9th-magnitude star; N very very slightly F the galaxy by 18’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. 21’ S somewhat P is the brightest star in the field, which is of magnitude 8.5. 20’ F very slightly N of the galaxy is a 10.5-magnitude star.

My SkySafari ‘alarm’ beeped, alerting us to the rise of the International Space Station; a quick glance at the Sputnik app showed ISS passing right by Sirius. We watched as the station rose out of the south, brightening as it passed into the sunlight and cleared the ring of muck that lay around the horizon, its low, brilliant blue-white light gliding silently by the brightest star in Earth’s sky, a glittering interloper among the panoply of the still-winter heavens.

9:09
NGC 3953 (UMa): This is a really fine galaxy. It has a diffuse, tenuous halo, 3.75’ x 1.25’ and elongated N-S, that fades out quickly on the N and S ends; it also has a considerably-brighter core, 0.5’ across, and a stellar nucleus; the core is gradually arrived-at but the nucleus is quite obvious and sudden. P the nucleus, just outside the halo, is a 14.5-magnitude star that can just be held steady in direct vision. 2.75’ F very very slightly N of the galaxy is a 12.5-magnitude star; SF the galaxy by 4.25’ is another of 12.5-magnitude; the galaxy and the 12.5-magnitude stars form a right triangle with the first 12.5-magnitude star as the right-angle vertex. N very very slightly P the galaxy by 6.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s yet another 12.5-magnitude star N of that star by 1’; from the first star by 4.5’ due F is an 11.5-magnitude star. 17’ P very slightly N of the galaxy is the brightest star in the field, which is 10.5 magnitude and forms a triangle with a 12.5-magnitude star 3.25’ S very very slightly P it and a 13th-magnitude star 2.5’ SF it.

Apparently, Corona Borealis had risen through the Eugene/Springfield skyglow; Robert made note of the fact, in a bit of gallows humor: “don’t look at Corona.”

9:22
NGC 4026 (UMa): A very fine edge-on galaxy, this one lies near NGC 3953; it’s an impressive, well-defined N-S streak, subtending 3.25’ x 0.75’. Even the ends of the halo seem pretty “conclusive” and well delineated. The galaxy has a very very small but very bright core or a substantial quasi-stellar nucleus; possibly both. The ends of the halo are not bright, but snap in averted vision. The brightest star in the field is N slightly F the galaxy by 7’ and is magnitude 9.5. 3.25’ N somewhat F is a 14th-magnitude star. Almost due S of the galaxy by 4’ is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s another of 13th magnitude SF that star by 1.5’; between the second star and the galaxy, almost halfway, is a 14.5-magnitude star that’s not directly between but a bit F that line along the midpoint. F slightly S of galaxy by 7.5’ is a 13th-magnitude star with a 14th-magnitude star N very slightly F it by 1’.

The following trio of galaxies reinforced my belief that it’s best not to look at photos of the objects I’m planning to observe (and not to read too much about them either!); the element of surprise makes the observing all the more fun when the objects being observed turn out to be so visually outstanding.

9:34
NGCs 4085, 4088 (UMa): An extremely impressive pair!  NGC 4088 is huge; NGC 4085 is a nice edge-on without much central concentration. NGC 4085 is elongated P-F, 2.0’ x 0.5’, with a better-defined halo than 4088. Its interior may hold a very very faint nucleus or a very, very small, faint core. There are a lot of bright stars in the field: SF and SP 4085 are 8th-magnitude stars; the one to the SF is just a tiny bit brighter, and is 6.5’ from the galaxy; the other lies to the galaxy’s SP by 5.5’, and from that star another 5.5’ P somewhat S is a 9.5-magnitude star. 3.5’ P somewhat N of 4085 is an 11.5-magnitude star that has a 10th-magnitude star 4’ P it; S slightly P that star by 2’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. [A super-bright satellite passes N-S between the two galaxies!] 11’ N slightly F 4085 is NGC 4088: it’s a massive galaxy, no less than 4.5’ long and 1.5’ across the middle; the ends of its halo are very narrow, but it has a 2.5’ x 1.0’ oval central bulge; there isn’t much in the way of central concentration; other than the tips of its arms, it’s pretty evenly illuminated. The halo is elongated P slightly S-F slightly N. An excellent galaxy! 3.75’ NF the F end of the galaxy is a 14.5-magnitude star. P very very slightly S of the galaxy by 9’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; P somewhat N of the galaxy by 18’ is a 9.5-magnitude star that has one of magnitude 12.5 S of it by 3.25’; from that star S very very slightly P by 4.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star.

9:53
NGC 4157 (UMa): The seeing is tremendous right now, just in time for another really, really fine edge-on galaxy–it’s another huge one too, spanning 4.25’ x 0.5’. This one has a fair amount of central brightening along its major axis, including a 0.75’ long, thin core and a difficult but definite stellar nucleus. The N edge of the galaxy is more-abruptly cut off, as if there’s a dark lane on that side. The galaxy is oriented P somewhat S-F somewhat N; along the major axis, about 4’ P somewhat S of center, is a 10th-magnitude star that has an 11.5-magnitude star almost due S of it by 2’; from the first star due SF by 1.67’ is a 13.5-magnitude star, and those three stars form an isosceles triangle SP the galaxy. 20’ S somewhat F the galaxy is a 9th-magnitude star. 8’ P the galaxy is a 13.5-magnitude star. N very slightly P the galaxy by 4.3’ is a very distracting 8th-magnitude star that’s the brightest in the field. Due N of galaxy by 3’ is a 14.5-magnitude star; NF the galaxy by 5.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star. 21’ NF the galaxy is a really fine double/pair: 8th- and 10th-magnitude stars, with the brighter N slightly F the fainter by 12”. 

While I was tracking down the galaxy stream spilling from the back of the Dipper, Loren was trying to track down the Cone Nebula with the club’s 14.7″ scope; he was considerably more ambitious than I was on the evening.

10:06
NGC 4100 (UMa): Another really nice inclined galaxy–this is Excellent Edge-On Galaxy Central. This one is much more featureless than some of the previous, much more even in brightness, though it’s very bright to start–only the ends of the halo are dimmer. There is a stellar nucleus, but it’s hard to hold steadily; otherwise, it’s just very evenly bright. The galaxy subtends 3.75’ x 1.0’, and is oriented N very very slightly P-S very very slightly F. The halo is pretty well defined, partly because only its ends fade away into the background. S of the galaxy by 4.5’ is the brightest star in a little right triangle; that star is 12th magnitude, and there’s a 13.5-magnitude star P that one by 2.5’ which is the right-angle vertex; the third vertex is 2’ due S of the right-angle vertex and is 14.5 magnitude. N slightly P the galaxy by 7.5’ is the brightest star in the field, which is 8.5 magnitude and has 3.75’ P very very slightly S of it a 10.5-magnitude star; there’s a 12th-magnitude star N very slightly P the 8.5-magnitude star by 4.25’; from the 10.5-magnitude star 1.25’ NP is one of magnitude 13.5 and from the 10.5-magnitude star P by 1’ is a 14.5-magnitude star; so these (the 8.5, the 10.5, and the 12th) form a nearly-equilateral triangle that has a smaller isosceles triangle at its SP vertex. From the galaxy P very very slightly S by 11’ is a 10th-magnitude star that has another of 10th magnitude S very very slightly P it by 2.5; the more-S of those two is slightly dimmer. 26’ S of the galaxy and very very slightly P is a 7.5-magnitude star.

10:18
NGC 4047 (UMa): This is probably the least of the galaxies this evening so far; on another night, it would be more impressive, but it’s much less so with all the great ones tonight. This little galaxy spans 0.75’ x 0.67’ and is elongated pretty much P-F. It’s quite well defined, with a large core ⅔ of the diameter that’s somewhat brighter than the halo and a stellar nucleus. The galaxy is fairly bright and lies in a particularly populous field; S of it by 12’ is a very lonely 12th-magnitude star; SF that star is an interesting asterism. From the galaxy 4’ P very very slightly S is another 12th-magnitude star; from that star P very very slightly S by 3.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. NF the galaxy by 7’ is a 12th-magnitude star which has F it by 2’ one of 13th-magnitude with a 13.5-magnitude F very very slightly S of it by 0.67’.  NF the galaxy by 17’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. P the galaxy by 21’ is a 10th-magnitude star with a 14th-magnitude SP it by 0.67’; from the galaxy SP by 18’ is another 10th-magnitude star.

10:32
NGC 4096 (UMa): I’m glad I’m ending my Herschel hunting with this stretch of sky, because these galaxies are almost all great; this is another huge edge-on (or very inclined) galaxy, spanning 4.75’ x 0.75’ and elongated SvsP-NvsF. Interestingly, the N end is much-less defined than the S end, although it’s quite diffuse on both ends; it’s not well defined there, but is quite well defined along the middle section. The galaxy has a tiny faint stellar nucleus, set within a small, gradually-arrived-at core that’s somewhat offset to the N and not well distinguished from the halo. The P and F edges run parallel for most of the galaxy’s length; they don’t narrow until close to their ends, rendering the galaxy pill-shaped. The galaxy lies in a pretty-well populated field containing a number of bright stars. NP by 4’ is the brighter of a double/pair which has the fainter companion due F it; these are 11.5 and 14th magnitudes, separated by 0.3’. N very slightly P the galaxy by 8’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; there’s another of the same magnitude N slightly F the galaxy, also by 8’. S of the galaxy by 13’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; there’s an 8.5-magnitude star SP the galaxy by 10’ and another of magnitude 8.5 SF by 16’. SF by 4.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star.

The next galaxy demands a better look with larger aperture and more magnification; it’s certainly one of the galaxy highlights of the Herschel lists, highly reminiscent of NGC 157 in Cetus, and probably visible in binoculars.

11:00
NGC 4051 (UMa): We’re well removed from the bowl of the Dipper now with this large, bright, and impressive galaxy! This one has a lot of interesting detail visible; it’s elongated NP-SF mostly, but I’m not sure I’m not seeing some sort of central bar.  The galaxy is pretty large, 3.5’ x 2.0’, and extended NP-SF. There’s very much a suggestion of a central bar in averted vision. The galaxy is irregularly bright across the halo, especially on the F side; the halo is considerably diffuse but pretty well defined. The galaxy has a distinct stellar nucleus. Due P the galaxy by 2.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star; P that star by 2.5’ is the right-angle vertex of an isosceles right triangle which includes the previous star; the right-angle vertex is 14th magnitude and there’s another of 14th magnitude S of it by 2.5’. The star to the P is interesting because even when the eyepiece is clear [it’s fogged several times] the star looks nebulous, almost like the halo extends out to it; in fact, the nucleus looks a little shifted to the SP; like it’s not centered. F somewhat N of the galaxy, 2.75’ from the nucleus, is a 14th-magnitude star; F somewhat S of that star by 3’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. SF the galaxy by 12’ is the brightest star in the field, which is 8.5 magnitude; there’s another very slightly fainter P somewhat N of the galaxy by 18’, and this second star has 12’ P it a 7.5-magnitude star. In averted vision, from the SF corner of the galaxy and extending toward the 14th-magnitude star F somewhat N of the galaxy, is almost a part of a spiral arm; there’s an impression that the galaxy has a Z-shape, but only a hint of this is visible at this aperture and magnification. In the section of halo stretching toward the 11th-magnitude star P the galaxy, every so often in averted vision there’s an irregularity in the brightness of the halo, like an outline of an arm there. Along the SP quadrant there’s definitely space between the body of the galaxy and the section stretching toward the 11th-magnitude star–WOW!

11:24
NGC 4102 (UMa): A nice, bright, considerably-smaller galaxy than most tonight, this one still covers 1.5’ x 0.67’. It’s elongated SP-NF, with a diffuse, poorly-defined halo but a small bright core that’s 0.25’ and pretty suddenly arrived-at. I’m not sure I’m getting a nucleus. S of the galaxy by 6’ is an 11th-magnitude star, and there’s another of 11th magnitude SP that star by 5.5’; those two are on the N edge of a kind of random agglomeration of 13th/14th-magnitude stars; the 11th-magnitude stars are the NP and NF vertices of that. The galaxy has a 13th-magnitude star P by 0.75’ from center; due F the galaxy by 2’ is a 13.5-magnitude star with one of 14th magnitude 2.25’ F very very slightly N of it; S very slightly F the 14th-magnitude star by 4’ is another of 13.5 magnitude. N somewhat P the galaxy by 12’ is an 8th-magnitude star, and NP the galaxy by 12’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. 15’ due F the galaxy is a 10th-magnitude star.

11:37
NGC 4271 (UMa): This little galaxy is the first really unimpressive one tonight (it’s still a galaxy, though!). It’s located just FsS of Merkab in the Big Dipper–a very small roundish galaxy, no more than 0.75’ across, with a small somewhat-brighter core that’s the first thing visible about it and a distinct stellar nucleus. 0.5’ NF and 1’ P just outside the galaxy’s halo are 14th-magnitude stars. 4.75’ S of the galaxy is a 13th-magnitude star; 3.5’ P very slightly S of the galaxy is a just-above threshold star. N very slightly P the galaxy by 12’ is the brightest star in the field, which is magnitude 9.5; there’s another very slightly fainter F somewhat N of the galaxy by 7.5’, and S of that star by 6’ is a 12th-magnitude star. S very very slightly P by 23’ (so outside the field)  is an 8.5-magnitude star. To the F and NF of the galaxy are a bunch of bright (9th/10th/11th) mag stars in a jumble; the two to F somewhat N and the one S of that are the P edge of that agglomeration, which spans 18’ P-F by 16’ and has fourteen stars in it.

Frank had already left, being perpetually on-call for airplane repairs; Dan was following, with work in the morning.

The last galaxy for the evening was one that had somehow gotten passed over on my first run through the spring Herschels, and had escaped my notice each time I’d gone through my lists for verification. Under lesser conditions, I’d probably pass over it in the eyepiece, as well.

12:01
NGC 3693 (Crt): This one’s a bit out of the way for tonight: I missed it on my first run-through of Crater. It’s a rather difficult, not really Herschel-list-quality object: a very, very thin streak running P-F and spanning 1.25’ x less than 0.25’ (0.125’?). Much of its length is not visible in direct vision; it’s mostly an averted-vision object. The core is very, very slightly brighter; most of what’s actually visible is the core, as there’s no nucleus visible. The galaxy lies in a moderately-crowded field, especially for this part of the spring sky (one would tend to think of Crater as being somewhat thin on background stars). The most noteworthy object / brightest star in the field is 8th magnitude and is NP the galaxy by 10’. Due P the galaxy by 3.5’ is the middle star, brightest, and F-most in an arc of three; this star is 11.5 magnitude; there’s a 13.5-magnitude star due N of that star by 4’ and a 12th-magnitude star 4’ S slightly P. NF the galaxy by 17’ is the brightest and NF-most in another short line of three; that star is 10th magnitude and has 1.75’ P slightly S of it an 11.5-magnitude star; there’s a 13th-magnitude star P very slightly S that star by 2’. From the brightest in that line due N by 3.5’ is a tiny grouping 0.25’ across, containing perhaps three 14.5-magnitude stars. F slightly S of the galaxy by 6’ is an 11.5-magnitude star with an 11th-magnitude star F very slightly S of it by 2.25’.

Another thirteen galaxies recorded and struck from the list. With the next night predicted to be equally clear, I could be finished with six years’ worth of Herschel hunting in twenty-four hours.

III. Having gotten home from Eureka at a reasonable hour, I managed a fair amount of sleep and still had time to double- (if not triple-) check my notes and checklists of the Herschel 400 and Herschel II programs… all of the different versions that I had, simply for the sake of CMA. The forecast for the night was excellent, and Bob the Dob was all ready to go.

Tonight was to be the end of my “Herschel 800” observing.

As with the previous night, the little observing field was bustling with EAS regulars (all of whom would probably agree that the term “EAS Irregulars” would probably be more appropriate): Jerry and Kathy, Frank, Dan B, and Loren all pulled up within minutes of my arrival.

03/19-3/20/20 
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 7:24 PM
MOON: 27 days (rose at 6:01 AM; 10% illuminated)
SEEING: 8
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.32
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to 32F; some dew after 10:30, became considerable; chilly but tolerable; occasional clouds low on west, south, and east horizons
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, KO, FS, DB, LR

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

9:39
NGC 4605 (UMa): This will probably be my last night on the Herschel 400 and HII lists, and this galaxy is a really good one to start with! It’s a very impressive inclined spiral with an odd shape; it’s not a perfect streak or oval, but is bulging toward the S; the N edge is kinda flat, or it’s wider/blunter on the P end than F; like the central bulge is offset to the S. The galaxy is elongated P slightly N-F slightly S, and is 3.25’ x 0.75’ across the middle. There’s no nucleus visible. The very ends of the halo are poorly defined and vanish into the background sky, although there is a lot of interior brightening along the major axis. The halo itself is irregularly bright, and the F end is much better defined; to the S and P the galaxy fades out. The galaxy is situated in a field that’s not particularly busy. There’s a 14.5-magnitude star due S of the galaxy by 1.25’. S very very slightly P the galaxy by 5.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s a 13th-magnitude star P that star by 2.25’, and that second star is SP the galaxy by 6’. NP the galaxy by 8’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. F very slightly N of the galaxy by 13’ is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s a 10th-magnitude star NF that star by 2.5’, and then P that star by 1’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; the 12.5-magnitude star serves as the right-angle vertex of a triangle comprising those three stars, and the 10th-magnitude star is the brightest in the field. N slightly F the galaxy by 12’ is a 10.5-magnitude star with a 12.5-magnitude star P very very slightly N of it by 1.75’. Due P the galaxy by 3.75’ is a 15th-magnitude star that has a 14.5-magnitude star SP it by 2’.

For some reason unremembered at this remove, my next set of notes began with a dramatic, multi-person reenactment of the Young Frankenstein “yummy noises” scene. I’m still trying to figure that one out.

9:53
NGC 5204 (UMa): An exceedingly diffuse galaxy N of Mizar. The halo is elongated N-S, 2.5’ x 1.67’, with very, very gradual central brightening; there’s no real halo/core distinction. The halo is also very poorly defined and fades right into the background. No nucleus is apparent. A stream of stars runs SP-NF through the field: due SP the galaxy by 9’ is a 12.5-magnitude star that has SP it by 1.75’ a 10th-magnitude star; that star has 0.67’ due S of it an 11.5-magnitude star that has P it by 0.3’ a 14th-magnitude star; those last three form a small right triangle with the 11.5-magnitude star as the right-angle vertex. From the 12.5-magnitude star F very slightly S by 4’ is another 12.5-magnitude star; the third star in the line (not counting the triangle) is 3.25’ F very slightly S of the second and is 13th magnitude, and that star (the last in the line) is S of the galaxy by 7.5’. SF the galaxy by 5.5’ is another 12.5-magnitude star; there’s a 14.5-magnitude star between that star and the galaxy and very slightly P that line; it’s 2.75’ SsF the galaxy. F very very slightly N of the galaxy by 3.75’ is a 14.5-magnitude star; 8’ that same direction from the galaxy is a 13th-magnitude star that has NF it by 4’ a 10.5-magnitude star. From the galaxy NP by 15’ is an 11th-magnitude star. The brightest star in the field is SP the galaxy by 18’ and is 8th magnitude.

(If you’re wondering: yes, I’m using a lot more bold/underline for emphasis these days. Like the Young Frankenstein bit, though, I’m not quite sure why; my note-taking evolves in odd directions, I suppose.)

10:07
NGC 5308 (UMa): Along the back of Ursa Major, a third of the way from Thuban to Mizar. This is a really nice edge-on, one of many here in eastern Ursa Major. It’s  1.67’ x 0.3’, elongated PvsS-FvsN , with a very conspicuous tiny core and very bright quasi-stellar nucleus. S of the galaxy by 4.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star; P slightly S of that star by 1.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star; P slightly S of that star by 0.75’ is a 10th-magnitude star, and that line runs almost parallel to the galaxy. SF the galaxy by 1.5’ is a 14th-magnitude star; N very very slightly F the galaxy by 2.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star. Along the galaxy’s major axis, F very very slightly N by 4.5’, is a 14th-magnitude star. NP the galaxy by 5’ is a 13.5-magnitude; a further 3’ NP the galaxy is a 10.5-magnitude star with a 12th-magnitude star N slightly P it by 1.67’. S of the galaxy by 17’ is an 8.5-magnitude star; F somewhat S of the galaxy by 15’ is a 10th-magnitude star that’s the NF end of a fishhook-like asterism that spans 6.5’ SP-NF and has at the end of its stem a 10.5-mag star.

10:18
NGC 5322 (UMa): This guy (why is it always “guys”?) is a bright P-F galaxy of 1.3’ x 0.75’, with a bright round core that’s kind of gradually brightened to but has a well-defined edge. The core contains a bright substellar nucleus. The area immediately around the galaxy is barren of stars; the galaxy sits in the middle of an equilateral triangle of dim stars and also serves as the middle point of a capital ‘Y’ pattern; the sides of the triangle are each 11’ long; the brightest of the triangle stars is N slightly F the galaxy by 6.5’ and is 12.5 magnitude, and it has a 14.5-magnitude star 1.25’ NF it; along that same direction, between the galaxy and the 12.5-magnitude star, 2.75’ from the galaxy and very slightly P that line, is one of 14th magnitude; due P the galaxy by 7’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; there’s another of the same magnitude S somewhat F the galaxy by 6.5’, and those stars (the two 13.5s and the 12.5) form an equilateral triangle around the galaxy. The brightest star in the field is N slightly F the galaxy by 21’ and is 8th magnitude. P very very slightly S of the galaxy by 17’ is an 8.5-magnitude star that has a 9.5-magnitude star N very very slightly P it by 5’; due S of the galaxy by 8’ is a 14.5-magnitude star.


10:34
NGC 5430; PGC 49818 (UMa): A switch from the edge-on or face-on spirals so prevalent throughout Ursa Major; this is an irregular-looking galaxy without looking like an irregular galaxy. The galaxy spans 1.67’ x 0.67’.  It’s elongated roughly N-S, but has a lot more halo fuzz on the N end. Its core is quite a bit brighter than the halo. Is this a barred spiral, with the “core” actually a bar? [If so, it would require greater aperture to determine this.] NP the galaxy by 3.75’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that’s the SF vertex of a tiny isosceles triangle whose sides are no more than 0.67’ long; due N of that star by 0.67’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; there’s one of 14th magnitude almost due P it by 0.67. P somewhat S of the galaxy by 6’ is a 12.5-magnitude star that has a 14th-magnitude star N very very slightly F it by 2’. Every so often, 1’ S from the 12.5-magnitude star, is a hint of a very, very small non-stellar spot (PGC 49818); the best I can describe it as is “small and faint.” NP the galaxy by 14’ is a 10th-magnitude star; there’s an 8th-magnitude star N very slightly F the galaxy by 14’, and that has a 12.5-magnitude star N very very slightly F it by 1.25’, and almost halfway between the 8th-magnitude star and the galaxy is a 10th-magnitude star. F the N end of the galaxy (F very very slightly N of center) by 1.75’ is a very faint close double that has NF it by 2’ a 13.5-magnitude star; the double has 14.5- or 15th-magnitude components separated P-F by 10”. S very very slightly P galaxy by 16’ is a 10th-magnitude star that has an 8.5-magnitude star due P by 9’.


10:57
NGC 5443 (UMa): another nice edge-on galaxy–one of rso many here in Ursa Major. This one is elongated S slightly P-N slightly F, 1.5’ x 0.5’. It’s pretty irregularly-bright, although it’s hard to tell how much of that is a core/nucleus kind of distinction; it does seem to have a somewhat-brighter core, although nothing here is absolutely sure to be a nucleus. The ends of the halo, along the major axis, are not regularly illuminated. S of the P end of the galaxy is a 14.5-magnitude star; just off the NF end, maybe slightly F that end of the galaxy, is another of 14.5 magnitude that can only be held with difficulty. Due N of the galaxy by 4’ is the brightest star (at magnitude 9.5) and the SF vertex in a not-quite-parallelogram; it’s also the right-angle vertex in a triangle that includes the galaxy and an 11th-magnitude star P it by 2’; due N of the 9.5-magnitude star (in a line with the galaxy) by 5’ is a 10th-magnitude star; there’s another 11th-magnitude star F very slightly N that star by 1.75’.  F the galaxy by 3.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star. SP galaxy by 6’ is another 9.5-magnitude star; S very slightly P by 5.5’ is a pair: 14th and 14.5 magnitude stars, with the brighter F the fainter by 0.25’. The two 9.5-magnitude stars and the 12th-magnitude star F the galaxy also form a right triangle framing the galaxy, with the 9.5-magnitude star N of the galaxy as the right-angle vertex.


11:16
NGC 5585 (UMa): This is clearly a face-on spiral. It’s extremely diffuse, although it does have some weak central concentration. It’s hard to determine its elongation; roughly N-S? It spans 2.3’ x 1.5’, although it’s so poorly-defined and diffuse that it could be much bigger and I wouldn’t be able to tell. It’s another irregularly-bright galaxy, even just across the halo; the central 50% is very very slightly brighter, although I don’t see a nucleus. It’s quite a tough object to draw detail from. The P side of the halo is better defined than the F side; the cutoff is sharper on the P. 5’ SF is a 9th-magnitude star; NF the galaxy by 3.3’ is an 11.5-magnitude star, and the galaxy marks the right-angle vertex of a triangle with those two. S very very slightly P the galaxy by 2.25’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. N very slightly F the galaxy by 13’ is a 9th-magnitude star; that star has P it by 1.25’ a 13th-magnitude star. NF the galaxy by 23’ is an 8.5-magnitude star.


I went through my SkySafari list, my recorded notes, and my laminated copy of SkyAtlas 2000.0 (which had Post-It flags on it indicating the various Herschel objects; these were removed one-by-one each time I observed an object). I had three—and technically, only two—objects remaining, one a Herschel II and the others Herschel 400s. And as it turned out, I had already taken notes on the Herschel II object that remained, and hadn’t checked it off yet. But any excuse to re-observe that object and its nearby companions was a good excuse.

11:28
NGCs 5371, 5350, 5354, 5353, 5355 (CVn): This is the last Herschel II object remaining on my list! I missed this one (NGC 5371) as it wasn’t on one of my lists, and I didn’t notice until late in the process; I’d seen it several times, as it’s right nearby my favorite Hickson Compact Group (HCG 68), which is just on the SP edge of field. The galaxy is a large N-S glow, 2.75’ x 1.5’, with a very diffuse halo and very small core containing a notable stellar nucleus. It’s quite obviously a face-on galaxy, just based on its appearance. The edges of the halo are not well defined; the halo looks ragged, vanishing into the background sky. NF the galaxy by 2.67’ is a 9th-magnitude star that’s the brightest in the field; 5.25’ due N of the galaxy is a 9.5-magnitude star. P slightly N by 5’ is a 14th-magnitude star; there’s another of 14th magnitude P the galaxy by 1.5’; 1’ S slightly P that star is one of 14.5 magnitude. Due S of the galaxy by 6’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that’s the S-most vertex of a right triangle; N somewhat F that star by 2.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star; NP that star by 1.25’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; the second star (the 13th magnitude) is the right-angle vertex. S slightly P the galaxy by 12’ is an interesting double of equal (12th) magnitudes separated SP-NF by 0.25’. P slightly S of the galaxy by 30’ is a 6.5-magnitude star with a 10.5-magnitude star 1’ S of it; SP the 6.5-magnitude by 4’ is a 9th-magnitude star, and the 6.5-magnitude star also has Hickson 68 “around” it, F and NF the star: the largest and most diffuse of the galaxies (NGC 5350) is 3’ NF that star and is 1.25’ diameter; its halo is very, very diffuse with only slight central concentration; it has a vague core, and maybe a very very faint stellar nucleus; 4’ F somewhat S of the star is a P-F galaxy (NGC 5354) that spans 0.75’ x 0.67’; it’s pretty well defined, with a small brighter core and a stellar nucleus; due S of that galaxy is one (NGC 5353) of 1.0’ x 0.3’, oriented NP-SF, with a brighter core and an obvious stellar nucleus; from the first galaxy F by 4.75’ is the fourth galaxy (NGC 5355), which forms a nearly-equilateral triangle with the first and third ones; it’s 1.0’ x 0.75’, oriented N-S, with a faint halo but noticeable core and stellar nucleus. (I somehow missed the fifth member of HCG 68 completely.)


And just like that, the Herschel II list was done!

I had planned my lists to finish the Herschel II before the Herschel 400, i.e. to complete the more-difficult list before the easier… and to finish both of the Herschel programs before the even-easier Messier program. I’m not sure why this appealed to me, but the idea of working the lists in reverse seemed like a very Australopithicene thing to do. So the end of the Herschel 400 beckoned….

11:47
NGC 5631 (UMa): This is, technically, the last object I need to close out the Herschel 400, but it’s not one of the better of the H400 to end on. It’s a very small but bright round spot, 0.75’ across, with a bright, smaller core that’s gradually arrived to and not much brighter than the halo, which is well defined; there’s a definite substellar nucleus that’s considerably bright for a galaxy nucleus. The field has lots of faint stars but none in the single-digit mag range. The galaxy itself is the right-angle vertex of an almost-perfect isosceles right triangle: due N of the galaxy by 3.25’ is a 13th-magnitude star, and there’s a 13.5-magnitude star P very very slightly N by 3’; the star to the N is also the S-most vertex in a triangle with a 12th-magnitude star NF by 2.3’ that has a 13.5-magnitude star P it by 1’. S very very slightly F the galaxy by 2.25’ is a 14.5-magnitude star. NP the galaxy by 7’ is a 12th-magnitude star; also NP the galaxy by 21’ is the brightest star in the field, which is 8.5 magnitude and has one of 11.5 magnitude F very very slightly N by 3.25’; that second star is the right-angle vertex of a triangle that includes the 8.5-magnitude star and a 13th-magnitude star 2’ S of the right-angle vertex.

I had technically finished the Herschel 400, but to put an exclamation point on the whole process, I made a reobservation of another object I had seen many times, but one whose previous set of notes—taken during my 2016 attempt at the Herschel Sprint—were unsatisfyingly brief for such a glorious galaxy. This also ensured that I ended the whole Herschel project on a showpiece, as was fitting for six years’ worth of study.

12:10
NGC 4559 (Com): I wasn’t happy with the sparse notes I took on this one during the Herschel Sprint back in 2016, so I’m rerecording them. This is a huge galaxy, no less than 6.5’ x 2.25’! It’s elongated NP-SF, with a very irregularly-bright halo and a central region that‘s less of a core than a broad central concentration spanning  1.5’ x 0.5’. The halo, especially on the N end, extends diffusely (?) beyond the immediately-visible part of the galaxy toward the N end; it gets ghostly toward that end. There are a few stellarings toward the galaxy’s N end, and three stars in a triangle on the F end, but no nucleus to speak of. The halo is not really very well defined, especially on the N end; the S end is helped by being bounded by the three stars there: the brightest of those three is F very very slightly S of the center of the galaxy by 1.5’ and is just inside the F edge of the halo; the halo extends a tiny bit beyond the star, which is 12th magnitude; S of the star and at the very S tip of the halo is a 13th-magnitude star that’s 1.3’ from the first star; 1.0’ P very slightly S of the second star is a 12.5-magnitude star; from the first star N slightly P along the edge of the galaxy is a darker lane or bay, as if the light cuts off along there; from the S-most star (second of the three) S slightly P by 2.25’ is a 14.5-magnitude star. F slightly S of the galaxy by 10’ (from the star on the F edge) is an 11.5-magnitude star; from the same star on the F edge of the galaxy 15’ S very very slightly P is a 12th-magnitude star; from the same star on the F edge 12’ N slightly F is a pair or double of 13th-magnitude stars, separated P slightly N-F slightly S by 0.5’. This is a phenomenal galaxy! 4.5’ P the galaxy from the star on the F edge is a 14th-magnitude star that has another of 14th magnitude SP it by 1.67’. The galaxy is wider on the S end than on the N; on the S end it’s as wide as the distance between the first and third stars; on the N end, it’s just over 2’ wide.

I stepped back from the telescope, looking upward in the direction of NGC 4559.

The Herschel 400 and Herschel II program lists were officially done.

Beyond, around, and among those that I had observed wheeled countless other galaxies, 1700 more of which were discoveries of William Herschel (and/or his sister Caroline). I had observed eight hundred of his/their best and brightest and had still only scratched the surface. Four hundred of these remaining galaxies were listed in the unofficial Herschel III program, which I’d already started working on (along with the Flat Galaxy, Arp, Galaxy Groups/Clusters, Messier, Double Star, Planetary Nebula, and Open Cluster programs).  And beyond Herschel’s own discoveries were still tens of thousands more within the range of the various telescopes in my possession or care.

Two doors had just been closed. A dozen or more had been opened.

My atlas was empty, but the sky was overflowing.

 

 

February Stars, February Miracles

Dispensing with the pithy quotes from famous authors as post titles, simply because this was too apt.

The winter of 2019/2020 was a harsh one. Our last observation occurred at the end of November; had everything stayed on track, I’d anticipated being able to finish the Herschel 400 and the Herschel II lists by May. The weather—as it so often did in Willamette winters—failed to cooperate, wiping out all of December and January and the first half of February (which has historically been our worst month anyway, cloud-wise). With my remaining targets in Canis Major, Monoceros, Puppies, and Pyxis, in addition to several galaxies in Camelopardalis, my prospects for finishing this year seemed poor—I had until the end of the dark phase in March to pick up forty-plus objects, most of them low in the south already as twilight ended.

Sometimes things fall together, though, and usually through no machinations of one’s own. The mid-February weather forecasts looked promising, and as those nights approached, the Clear Sky Chart began to agree. Clear nights were possibly at hand, and it only required readiness to take advantage of them. The stargazers of western Oregon were beginning to rise from their involuntary hibernation.

I. At our annual open house in early February, Loren and Dan B had suggested the possibility of heading out to the Eagle’s Rest amphitheater spot for our soonest observing session, the better to beat the inevitable crowd at Linslaw and the even-more inevitable dew at Eureka Ridge. I said that I’d be willing to give it a go, if only for the sake of having room to spread out my gear without fear of encroaching on someone else’s space. So when the various forecasts finally aligned on the 17th, we headed southeast for a long-awaited gathering of the photons.

When I arrived at the amphitheater, though, I wasn’t even sure I was in the right spot; only the fact that Loren was already parked there made me stop. The clear-cutters—who had been trashing areas all along Eagle’s Rest Road, including the area around our trusty gravel-pit site—had worked their Satanic magic on the amphitheater in our absence. What had been a somewhat sheltered (and very sky-limited, admittedly) alcove along the road had become a 270-degree view with no wind or light protection.

AmphiPano

Still, the southern horizon was flat, there was enough space for us (Dan B hadn’t been able to escape his work responsibilities, but there was room for him had he been able to make a break for it), and—rarest of all—the February sky was clear.

As we were waiting for twilight to fall and mirrors to cool, a pickup truck drove past. (This was the primary hard at the amphitheater; you were at the mercy of the drivers… more for their stopping than for them swerving off the road to hit you.)

What was unusual about this one is that—after he had sped past us—he then drove a quarter-mile back to see what we were doing… and he drove it backward, reversing up the dangerous, winding road.

The driver was either slightly inebriated or just deliberate in his speech, but he had the usual question: what are those things? As I was still in the process of aligning both optics and Telrad, Loren took the job of explaining what we were doing there, giving the fellow a look at Venus for his trouble.

“I thought those were telescopes,” the local flavor said. “That or you guys were gonna blow up half the countryside with cannons.”

So he drove off, apparently satisfied with what he’d seen and heard. If only all of our run-ins with locals were as friendly!

And then, it was time to start “working.”

02/17/20
EAGLE’S REST (amphitheatre) (43° 52′ 12.1476” N, 122° 47′ 19.0392” W)
SUNSET: 5:44 PM
MOON: 24 days (rose at 2:58 AM; 27%  illuminated)
SEEING: 5,7-8
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.37
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps low 20s, cold; humid (lots of frost); air relatively still, no wind
OTHERS PRESENT: LR

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

7:01
NGC 2259 (Mon): It’s not yet entirely dark, but it seems like a good time to start, as I’ve got a huge amount of space to cover. This cluster presents as a very dim, misty,  vaguely-rectangular patch filled with stars, many of them just outside the edge of resolution, plus a number slightly brighter. The cluster spans 3.5’ x 3’, and is elongated P slightly N-F slightly S. It’s moderately well detached and obviously a cluster but considerably faint, so not as easy to pick out of the rich starfield as it would be if it was a bit brighter; an observer could easily pass over it. There’s a moderate spread of magnitudes among the cluster members. It’s very very rich, even though most of its stars are just below the level of resolution; this contributes to the cluster’s slightly nebulous appearance; there are about seventeen stars visible and many more suspected. The brightest are poised on the N end, and then down along the P edge is a smaller patch of 14th-magnitude stars. There’s one star on the N very slightly P corner that’s a little brighter than the rest, at 12th magnitude, and it has N very slightly P it by 0.3’ a 13th-magnitude star; F very very slightly S of the lucida by 1’ is another 13th-magnitude star, and these mark the N extremity of the cluster. The patch to the P side has a number of 14th-magnitude and fainter stars in it; the patch is 1’ diameter and also contains a majority of the cluster’s brighter stars. From the lucida P very slightly S (so due P the cluster) by 5.75’ is an 8.5-magnitude star that’s surrounded by a group of brighter/brightish stars; from the 8.5-magnitude star P slightly S by 9’ is the brightest in field, at 6.5 magnitude, which has a bit of a yellowish tint.

7:20
NGC 2254 (Mon): This is another little blast of stars, much tighter and somewhat smaller than NGC 2259, but considerably brighter. The cluster is 4.5’ across (including the background glow from unresolved stars). There’s a knot of brighter stars central-P and because of this knot, 2254 is a more-obvious cluster than 2259 despite being less detached from the background. The cluster is very rich and has a number of stars in the 13th-14th range sprinkled over some unresolved background glow. The stars in the knot are in the 12th/13th-magnitude range; there are twelve in the knot, with the 12.5-magnitude cluster lucida on the P edge. Overall, there are maybe thirty total resolved stars, mostly in 13.5/14.5-magnitude range, with some 12th-magnitude stars scattered throughout and in the knot. Due SP the cluster is the NF vertex of an isosceles right triangle that has a fourth star toward the middle; the NF star in the triangle is 9th magnitude; SP it by 2.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star; from the first vertex (the 9th-magnitude star) due P by 2’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that’s the triangle’s right-angle vertex, and that star has 0.5’ SF it a 12th-magnitude star. From the lucida 16’ SP is the brightest star in the field, a double; the bluish-white primary is 6.5 magnitude and has due S of it by 0.25’ an 11th-magnitude star. NF the cluster by 12’ is the primary of another double: a 9.5-magnitude star with an 11.5-magnitude star 12” NF it.

7:39
NGC 2269 (Mon): This one is considerably different than the other two I’ve done so far tonight–it’s a little like Trumpler 1, in that it consists mainly of a long, thin line of stars that comprises the central axis and has the majority of cluster stars along it. The line extends N slightly P-S slightly F and is 3’ long and 0.5’ wide; there’s a star in the direct middle of it that’s brighter and two brighter ones on the ends; the star in the middle is barely the lucida at 11.5 magnitude, and it has SvsF it by 0.3’ an 11.7-magnitude star; at the S very slightly F end of the line is a 12th-magnitude star, and at the N very slightly P end is one of 12.5 magnitude. The cluster is pretty well detached and fairly obvious because it’s compact, dense, and quite rich, with about 25 stars ranging from the lucida down to 15th magnitude (so having a moderate range of magnitudes). There’s another close grouping of stars P that group that may still be part of the cluster; from the lucida to the brightest (at 11.7 magnitude, just slightly fainter than the lucida) in that grouping is 3.5’; that star is at the S end of that second group, which extends 2.75’ N very slightly F from there to a 13th-magnitude star at the N very slightly F end of that group. Also in the second group is a pair of 13.5-magnitude stars S and S very slightly P the star at the N end, each by 0.5’. The brightest star in the field is SF the lucida by 18.5’ and is 8.5 magnitude.

7:57
NGC 2302 (NGC 2299; Mon): This is an interesting two-part cluster, and the brightest so far tonight. The cluster sits in a pretty crowded field with a lot of bright stars in it; it’s about 4.5’ round total and obvious but not particularly well detached. It’s moderately rich, with 20 stars ranging from 10th-14th magnitude. The P subgroup consists of an arc of three on P side and a couple of stragglers F and SF; the arc, which contains the three brightest stars in the cluster, starts at its N end with an 11th-magnitude star; S very slightly P that star by 0.3’ is one of 11.5 magnitude; from that star 0.3’ SP is a 10th-magnitude star that’s the cluster lucida. From the star at the N of the arc SF by 0.75’ is another 11th-magnitude star; SF that star by 1.0’ is another 12th-magnitude star; from that star SP by 1’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; from this star due P by 1’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; these make up the P half of the cluster. From the star at the N end of the arc due F by 2.5’ is the N-most star in the second part, a 12th-magnitude star, which marks the NP vertex of a roughly-equilateral triangle comprising six stars; that star has SF it by 10” another of 12th magnitude; a 12.5-magnitude star lies 1’ F somewhat S from the first in this group, and from the same first star S by 1’ is a 12th-magnitude star. From the first in the triangle N by 1.25’ is a 10th-magnitude star that (if a member of the cluster) is the actual lucida, but I don’t think it’s a true member. 8’ NP the star at the N end of the arc in the first group is the brightest star in the field (at magnitude 6.5) and then 13’ due S from the star at the N end of the arc is the P very slightly N component of an almost-equal (9th-magnitude) pair separated by 0.5’; the component F very slightly S is just a bit fainter.

8:16
NGC 2309 (Mon): Impressive!  Lots of stardust in this cluster, lots of tiny faint stars over the indistinct background glow of many that are unresolved. The cluster is elongated kinda N-S, with a secondary axis kind of NP-SF; the majority of the faint glow runs N-S but a lot of the brighter stars are in a NP-SF stream. The cluster spans 6’ overall, with the denser portion to the S end, where the majority of the brighter (12th/13th-magnitude) stars are along the NP-SF stream; the cluster is 5.5’ wide NP-SF, with the majority of stars in a 3’ circle at the S end of the N-S axis. There’s an arc of stars slightly detached from the circle that arcs from the P up to the NF, where it seems to reach toward a 9th-magnitude star which is very very slightly reddish [keeping in mind, of course, that I’m partially colorblind toward the red]. There are about 20 visible stars here in the 12th-13.5 magnitude range and a similar number fainter, with the majority of background glow in the S circle and reaching from the P to the 9th-magnitude star at the N very slightly F. The SF edge of that concentration/secondary axis is marked by a quartet of evenly-spaced 14th-magnitude stars. The brightest star in the field is of magnitude 8.5 and lies P very very slightly N of the 9th-magnitude star by 14’. 

8:50
NGC 2311 (Mon): A broader, brighter cluster than any other tonight so far. This irregularly-shaped cluster is not well detached, largely because there are a lot of similarly-bright stars in the field. It spans 7’ NP-SF x 5’ N very very slightly F-S very very slightly P. It’s moderately rich without having a great mag range; the majority of stars are in the 11.5/12.5-magnitude range, so somewhat brighter than the other clusters tonight; the lucida is 10.5 magnitude and is on the NF corner. There are 35 stars here, plus a moderate amount of background density that could be unresolved stars. From the 10.5-magnitude star F very slightly S by 0.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star, and from the 10.5-magnitude N very very slightly F by 3.75’ is another of 10.5 magnitude that’s probably outside the cluster boundary. The majority of stars are on the S end and trail away to the SF; these form a kind of trailing wing to the cluster, and it streams due F from there–perhaps these are not all part of the cluster. (I did not count them as part of the cluster in either size or star-count.) From the lucida S slightly P by 10’ is a single isolated 10th-magnitude star, and from the lucida 9’ F is the P-most of an arc of three 7.5/8th-magnitude stars that are equally spaced; the star on the P end of the arc is brightest and has F very very slightly N of it by 3’ one of 8th magnitude, which has F very slightly S of it by 3.25’ an 8.5-magnitude star; these are the three brightest stars in the field. NP the lucida by 13’ is a 9th-magnitude star that’s the N end of a NP-SF squiggle that looks somewhat nebulous at this magnification and has seven individual stars; this might be a small cluster on its own; that 9th-magnitude star, the 7.5-magnitude NF the cluster, and the brighter SP of the cluster form a large triangle; the cluster is in the SF edge of this triangle.

I regretted having taken notes on NGC 2362, the Tau Canis Majoris Cluster, back the previous March; the conditions were better now, and the cluster was a glorious sight in the eyepiece. I didn’t really have time to take notes on it again—I had too many objects I needed to get to—but it was as always a grand sight, the lower power the better.

9:05
NGC 2354 (CMa): Something of a change of pace from the smaller, fainter clusters, this one lies down between Wezen and Tau in the Big Dog; appropriately, it’s a big sprawling cluster, about 10’ N very very slightly P-S very very slightly F, 15’ P slightly N-F slightly S, and triangular. (Seeing is pretty poor down here at the moment.) The cluster’s interesting because its center is basically empty of stars, almost as if there’s a dark nebula there, although there’s  no sign that there is, no dark edges. The SF vertex of the cluster’s triangular outline is 10th magnitude and is the SF vertex of a Hercules-keystone which is wider on the S than on the N; N very slightly P that vertex by 3’ is a 9.5-magnitude star that’s the other star on the F side of the keystone; the NP vertex is a double with 11.5- and 12th-magnitude components separated by 15” with the brighter P very very slightly N of the fainter; the primary of that pair is 1.75’ P very very slightly S of the 9.5-magnitude star (the NF vertex); the fourth vertex of the keystone is due S of the primary of the pair by 2.67’ and is 11th magnitude. The N vertex of the cluster proper is 11.5 magnitude and is 11’ N very slightly P the SF vertex [the transparency has also gone to crap now]. There are about sixty stars in the cluster, so it’s fairly rich, and it’s moderately-well detached, just barely identifiable as a cluster because the field is also pretty rich. The stars range from 9.5 magnitude down to 14th, so it has a pretty decent range. The member stars are concentrated in clumps here and there throughout. There’s a string of stars on the P edge that leads up to the star to the N, a 9’ long group of about seven/eight stars mostly of similar magnitudes to that vertex; the SP vertex of the cluster is a 12.5-magnitude star that has just F it and vsN by 0.67’ a very close pair of equally dim stars, about 13th-magnitude, separated P-F by 5”, and then from that vertex S very slightly F by 1.25’ is another faint close pair, with the brighter NF the fainter by 12”; those are 13th and 13.5 magnitude. It’s worth noting that each of the S vertices has a brighter star S of it; the one to SP has a 10th-magnitude star SP it by 3.5’ and the one to the SF has 2.75’ SF it a star of equal (10th) magnitude; that star is a very slight bit brighter than the SF vertex.

9:33
NGC 2367 (CMa): A hop, skip, and jump N of Tau, this is a really sharp little cluster (almost literally); it’s very much an arrowhead-type cluster, in the vein of NGC 6664 in Scutum. The cluster is exceedingly-well detached and obvious; I dropped right on it before needing to starhop to it. It’s elongated N-S, 4.75’ long on the P side and 3.25’ on the F side; across the N end, it’s 3’ wide. The cluster comes to a very sharp point; its second-brightest star (at magnitude 9.5) is the star on the S tip. The majority of the cluster’s bright stars is in the S half; those in the N half are fainter, and the N outline is less-well defined. N very very slightly P the 9.5-magnitude star to S by 1’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; N very very slightly P that star by 0.75’ is the primary of an excellent double: the primary is 9.5-magnitude and has a 10th-magnitude star due P it by 5”; from the star on the cluster’s S tip N very very slightly F by 1.25’ is another 10.5-magnitude star; those make up the brighter S portion of cluster; there’s also some unresolved glow and a few stars visible mainly with averted vision, and also a couple stars to the S and S slightly F of the S-most vertex that are much fainter, in the 13th/14th-magnitude range; a star 0.75’ to the S of the S vertex may be a close double but it’s too faint/close to tell. There’s almost a dark lane/void of stars that runs P-F between the N and S halves. The N end is wider but considerably fainter and sparser than the S end. The brightest star in this half is on the F end, with a faint (13th-magnitude) one 0.3’ F; the brightest on the F end is 3.25’ N very very slightly F of the star at the S tip and is 11th magnitude. There are seven visible resolved stars in the N half that stream P slightly N from that one; the most prominent of these is an 11.5-magnitude star SP the P-most vertex of the N section, and is P slightly N of the star on the F end by 2’; the P-most vertex is 0.67’ NP that star and is magnitude 13.5. The area around the cluster is also interesting; N of the cluster, 10’ N very very slightly F of the S-most vertex, is a tiny diamond whose two S-most stars are its brighter, 10.5- and 11th-magnitude (the one to F slightly N is the fainter), separated by 0.3’ P slightly S-F slightly N; the other two in the little diamond are much fainter: the more P of the two is 13th magnitude and the more F is 12.5 magnitude; the diamond spans 0.75’ x 0.3’, with major axis SP-NF. From the S-most in cluster S very slightly F by 11’ is a 7th-magnitude star; from the S-most vertex SP by 14’ is an excellent double: 7th- and 7.5-magnitude stars separated NP-SF by 4”; there’s another double a quarter of the way between that double and the S-most vertex of cluster: this one is very unequal, 9th and 11th magnitude stars, with its primary P slightly N of the fainter by 0.25’; the primary is 10’ SP the S-most vertex.

9:54
NGC 2489; Haffner 20 (Pup): We’re way way way down in Puppis now, where the transparency still isn’t great, and I’m dropping all my stuff (glasses, gloves) into the mud for some reason. This is pretty obviously a cluster: it’s pretty well detached, although many of the stars are of similar brightness to field stars, but they’re more concentrated here. The cluster is roughly round, 6’ across, with a frame of similar-mag stars; esp. to the S, SP, and SF to due F by a broken rectangular ring elongated NP-SF encircling the cluster; this ring is broken to the P and N with the cluster in middle. The cluster has a fairly narrow range of mags and is moderately rich, considering its size. There are about 25 stars in the 6’ circle, mostly of 11th/12th magnitude or so, with an additional smattering down to 13.5-magnitude star (I’m not accounting for extinction this low in the sky). On the N edge there’s a close double of dim components, 12.5 magnitude both, N slightly P-S slightly F each other by 9”; P very very slightly S of the double by 0.75’ is the brightest star in the cluster at 11.5 magnitude. N very very slightly P this lucida by 9’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; due S of the lucida by 14’ is a 6.5-magnitude star that has something unresolved S very slightly P it by 5.5’; not sure what it is: galaxy, nebula, or a very very distant unresolved cluster (turns out to be Haffner 20). There’s a 5th-magnitude star F very slightly S of the 6.5-magnitude star by 17’, and from the 6.5-magnitude star P very slightly S by 13’ is a 7th-magnitude star. 

10:18
NGC 2482 (Pup): A nice cluster down here in northern Puppis, this one seems to be completely average based on the Trumpler categories–it has moderate detachment, is moderately rich, and has a moderate range of magnitudes, but it’s considerably better than that indicates: bright and obviously a cluster. The cluster is about 12’ diameter and elongated NP-SF and recalls a cartoon archery bow, with an arrow nocked and pointing to the SP and the bowstring on the F side, with the bow to the P side. The bow has more to it on the SF end; the NP end is separated as if by a dark lane running through; there’s another due S in the S-central part of the cluster. The NP end is made up of an isosceles triangle whose brightest star is the SP vertex and the triangle extends N and NF from there; its long end is the NF end; there are nine stars in the triangle; its SP-most vertex is the second-brightest star in the cluster at 10.5 magnitude; there’s a 10.5-magnitude star S very slightly F that star by 2.67’ which is very slightly brighter (10.3?) and that’s the lucida, almost dead center in the middle of the bow. The bow stretches 10’ long and from the lucida F very slightly N (at its widest) it’s 2.5’ wide. The arrow is 5’ long and its tip is a double of 10.5 and 12th magnitudes, with the brighter P slightly S of the fainter by 0.25’; the arrow is pointed at a solitary bright (8th-magnitude) star 6.5’ P somewhat S of the lucida. From the lucida N slightly F by 13’ is the brightest star in the field, which is 7.5 magnitude. There are two 8th-magnitude stars that form the F edge of a triangle that’s NF the cluster; the dimmer of these (10th magnitude) is the P vertex and is 11’ NF the cluster lucida; from that star F slightly S by 2’ is one 8th magnitude, and the other 8th magnitude (which is very slightly dimmer) is N very slightly F the first by 2’. There are about forty-five stars in the cluster, within a fairly narrow magnitude range, from the lucida down to 13.5/14th magnitude; the majority are within the 10-13th magnitude range.

One of the first areas of the sky to capture my attention on the Sky Atlas 2000.0 charts when I first purchased them (1988!) was the region around the Seagull Nebula, an extensive complex of clusters and reflection and emission nebulae that crosses the borders of Monoceros and Canis Major. As I learned more about the practical aspects of astronomy, I learned that I’d need a significant aperture boost over my old 8″ SCT and much darker skies than I had in Cincinnati in order to see the clouds of gas and dust and young stars that inhabited this region of local space—now, with a first great opportunity to peruse the area carefully, I didn’t really have the time. I’d have to stick with the clusters, saving the Seagull Nebula proper for another night.

10:43
NGC 2335 (Mon):–This cluster lies at the N end of the Seagull Nebula complex but that will have to wait for another time. The cluster is pretty shapeless and inhabits a bright field with a number of single-digit-magnitude stars in it. NGC 2335 is 10’ in diameter and vaguely roundish, moderately rich, and with a pretty wide range of magnitudes, from magnitude 9.5 down to 14th magnitude. The cluster doesn’t have much in the way of immediately-distinguishing features; the two most prominent are a double on the N central edge consisting of roughly equal (11.5) magnitude stars, separated P-F by 0.3’; S slightly F that double, on the SF edge of the cluster, is a regular diamond of stars whose SP vertex is its brightest at magnitude 9.5 and lies 4.5’ SF the F-most of the pair; N very very slightly F the 9.5-magnitude star by 1.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star, and those two form the diamond’s minor axis; from the 9.5-magnitude star NP by 1.3’ is the P-most vertex of the diamond, which is 10.5 magnitude, and the same distance F somewhat N of the 9.5-magnitude star is the F-most vertex, which is 11th magnitude; the diamond’s major axis is 2.25’ long. Overall the cluster has about thirty-five member stars; around the diamond there’s some ambient glow, perhaps from the Seagull complex or from unresolved starglow within the cluster. Between the diamond and the double to the N and running P and F, there seem to be some splotches of dark nebulosity in the cluster, especially to the P side. F the double to the N by 8’ is a 7th-magnitude star that’s the brightest in the field; from that star S very very slightly P by 5.5’ is a small detached patch that looks like a possible chunk of nebula or a detached bit of cluster (or a separate faint cluster), 1’ across. NP the double on the N by 5.5’ is the brighter and more F of another pair; that star is 10th magnitude and has P it by 0.3’ a 12.5-magnitude star. S slightly P by 15’ from the double on the N is an 8th-magnitude star; there’s another 8th-magnitude star SF that one by 5’. 

10:58
NGC 2343 (Mon): Lying very nearby 2335, this is a fine, bright, fairly-well detached, moderately rich diamond-shaped cluster, almost a regular diamond, elongated [seeing is really good now!] 7’ NP-SF x 4.25’ SP-NF. The SF vertex, at the end of the major axis, is a bright double [a slow bright satellite is moving P-F through the field] whose primary is the cluster lucida at 8.5 magnitude; it has P slightly N of it by 12” an 11th-magnitude star [another, smaller and slower satellite is wandering through]. N very very slightly P the primary by 3.25’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; P that star by 4’ is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s a 10th-magnitude star SF the first by 4’, and that star is almost due P the primary of the double by 4’; these mark the diamond’s outline. In the middle of the diamond and stretching to the P and S are the bulk of the cluster members, and the diamond’s SP vertex is also surrounded tightly within 0.5’ by a number of fainter stars. From the primary of the double P slightly N by 1.67’ is another double that’s very tight and very dim; it consists of an 11.5-magnitude primary and a 14th-magnitude secondary P by 4”. From the primary of the bright double (the SF vertex) NP by 2.5’ is a pair of 11th-magnitude stars separated P-F by 6”; also from the primary of the SF vertex NF by 23’ is the brightest star in the field (which is actually a bit outside the field), which is 6.5 magnitude. There are about twenty-five stars here overall, of a moderate range of magnitudes.

11:10
NGC 2353 (Mon): This cluster is also in the Seagull region; it’s a very impressive cluster with a huge magnitude range. It has a number of interesting features, not least of which is an extremely bright star on the due S that’s 6th magnitude, maybe 6.5, and also has a number of very bright pairs. The major axis is 11.5’ long, running due NP-SF; at its NP end is a 10th-magnitude star, with one of 11.5 magnitude N very very slightly F by 0.5’ and a 12th-magnitude star F slightly N by 0.67; at the F end of the major axis is an 11.5-magnitude star. The minor axis is S very very slightly P-N very very slightly F and is 7’ long, with the 6th-magnitude star on the S end; at the N end is a 9th-magnitude star. From the 6th-magnitude lucida N very very slightly F by 2’ is the brighter and more S of a pair that are 9th and 9.5 magnitudes separated by 0.3’. There’s about 30 stars here, the largest concentration lying just N of where the axes meet; at that juncture, there’s another pair, of which the primary is just N of the intersection of the axes: a 10.5-magnitude star with one of magnitude 12 NP by 5”; around that star is the greatest concentration of faint (threshold) stars. From the 6th-magnitude star 11’ SP is an 8th-magnitude star; from the lucida N very very slightly P by 23’ is the brightest in the vicinity, which is also 6th magnitude; there’s another 6th-magnitude star F slightly S of the lucida by 25’. There may be some dark nebulosity along the SP edge of the diamond and running a good chunk of the field, plus some on the SF, framing those two sides of the cluster.

It had been ten weeks since we had last observed; tonight felt like the breaking of a fast. There was still much more to see, but it would have to wait; the next several nights seemed equally promising, and would be equally busy. I had hoped to make it to at least midnight tonight, but the cold on this particular night eventually cut me a bit short. I’d try to do an all-nighter the next time out.

II. The next time out turned out to be the very next night.

This night, Linslaw Point was the site of the best local stargazing forecast per the CSC. Those who had used the site the night before, however, were squeamish—the wind had driven them off the bluff much earlier in the evening than the cold had chased me home from the Eagle’s Rest amphitheater. As a result, even a few of the stalwarts were reluctant to return to Linslaw with similar conditions forecast.

How bad could it have been?

It took little time to find out. Nathan and Mark had returned to the site from the previous night, but both agreed that the second night (this one) was worse. The skies were fine; my SQM readings were all in the 21.5 range once darkness was complete. But the wind and the cold… especially the wind…. There were times on my audio recordings that its howl was louder than my voice. It combined with the already-cold ambient air to become an oppressive force. Nathan and Mark had parked so as to shield their imaging rigs from as much of the onslaught as they could, but it would take a while for me to abandon my dark-adaptation in favor of pulling the Caveman-Mobile into windbreak position. Dan B and Loren were smarter, taking Mark and Nathan’s advice from the get-go.

 

02/18-02/19/20
LINSLAW POINT (43 58’ 48” N. 123 42’ 4” W)
SUNSET: 5:46 PM
MOON: 25 days (rose at 4:01 AM; 18% illuminated)
SEEING: 6-7-5
TRANSPARENCY: 7-8
SQM: 21.55
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: brutally cold (due mainly to wind); temps to low 20s; no humidity but wind chill barely-tolerable; wind loud on audio
OTHERS PRESENT: LR, DB, NC, MW

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

7:19
NGC 2316 (Mon): I’m getting an early jump on things here with this very small, probable reflection nebula (SkySafari has it listed as NGC 2317). It’s obvious in the eyepiece with no filter. The nebula is very very small, no more than 0.75’ across, with a central region that’s a fair amount brighter than the periphery. At second glance, it’s 0.75’ x 0.67’,  elongated P-F. The central region, where the illuminating star must be, is just about 0.3’ diameter, and the brightest section of the nebula (as usually is the case with reflection nebulae). The illuminating star itself is not quite visible beyond maybe a fleeting glimpse in averted vision only; every now and then in averted there’s a sense that there are two imbedded stars, just barely. It’s hard to describe the nebula’s texture at this magnification, as it’s a bit too small for much detail to be seen. The nebula is bounded on the S by a small, flat, almost-isosceles triangle of which the brightest star lies 1’ S of the nebula; it’s the closest to the nebula and is magnitude 12.5; 1.0’ F very very slightly S of that star is a 13th-magnitude star, and there’s another 13th-magnitude star 0.75’ P very very slightly S of the first star–a not-quite-isosceles triangle, but almost. F very very slightly S of the nebula by 6.5’ is a 9.5-magnitude star. P very very slightly S of the nebula by 5’ is a 10th-magnitude star. N very very slightly P the nebula by 10’ is a 9th-magnitude star; N very very slightly P of that star by 10’ is the brightest in the field (20’ N of the nebula), at 8th magnitude. S very slightly P the nebula by 9.5’ is another 9.5-magnitude star. With the UHC filter there are no real changes to the nebula’s appearance; I don’t expect much from either filter, but the UHC does almost nothing; it smooths out the brightness of the nebula and may be killing the central brightness around the imbedded stars and making the brightness of the nebulosity more uniform. With the O-III, the nebula is barely even visible; there’s certainly no improvement in the view.

The Bowl of the Big Dipper was by now just above the sandstone bluff—a subtle reminder that after I was done with the remaining winter clusters and nebulae, I still had forty-plus galaxies remaining in Ursa Major and Camelopardalis before I could finish my work on the two Herschel lists… and then had the unofficial third list to do before even getting halfway through William Herschel’s life list. So much to do, so few clear skies….

7:35
NGC 2346 (Mon): First of several planetary nebulae in Monoceros and Puppis I have on my list. With no filter, the central star is very obvious; it’s brightish at 11th (?) magnitude. The nebula lies in a very busy Milky Way field and is only visible as a very slightly elongated halo around the central star; there’s no annulus or anything but a P-F elongated glow. It appears to be about the same size as NGC 2316, 0.75’ x 0.67’. The nebula forms the S vertex of a roughly-isosceles triangle with two 12th-magnitude stars, one NF by 2.67’ and one NP by 2’. NP the nebula by 5.5’ is the F-most star in a lowercase ‘y’ pattern with five stars in it; this star is the end of the stem and is 11th magnitude; the N tine of the ‘y’ is the brightest star in it and is 10.5 magnitude and it lies 2.5’ from the previous star; the S tine lies 1.25’ due S of the N tine; the star in the middle of the ‘y’ is halfway between the end of the stem and the N tine and is 11.5 magnitude; there’s a 12th-magnitude star due P the star in middle by 0.75’. P very very slightly S of the nebula by 4.75’ is a 10th-magnitude star. The brightest star in the field lies 15’ F somewhat N of the nebula and is 8th magnitude; there’s a 9.5-magnitude star S somewhat P that star by 4.5′, and this star is the N-most vertex of a tiny scalene triangle whose other stars (moving S-ward) are 11.5- and 12th-magnitude; the long (P) side of the triangle is no more than 0.75’. The 8th-magnitude star has S very very slightly F by 10’ a 9.5-magnitude star that has a 10.5-magnitude star SP it by 1’ and a 12th-magnitude star due F it by 10”. With the O-III filter, there’s a lot of change from the unfiltered view; the nebula is much brighter, really popping into view; there’s no trace of the tendrils that show in photos but central star is still visible. The brighter part of the nebula is elongated P-F and the glow around it, the outer edge, is much more visible N and S; it almost resembles a barred spiral with the bar cutting across the entire width. Without the  filter I could have swept over it at first glance if I wasn’t specifically looking for it, but with the filter there’s no question that it’s a tangible object. This is an impressively-bright nebula, although not quite on the same tier as the Eskimo, NGC 3242, or even NGC 2438 in M46.

The next object on my agenda was NGC 2539, Thor’s Helmet; I had decided to use the higher SQM readings available at Linslaw to concentrate as much as possible on the remaining emission, reflection, and planetary nebulae on my agenda, as those objects would benefit the most from the darker skies. But even as I hunted down NGC 2539, I noticed a weird shadow effect in my eyepiece, with one side of the field being dark and the other having an unaccountable glare through it. It wasn’t extra light from Sirius, which was nearby but nowhere near close enough to cause such a glare. I fought with the glare  until it disappeared on its own, but still don’t know what caused it. In retrospect, it was probably the telescope’s shroud being pushed into the light path by the wind, as the shroud is non-elastic and has stretched out of shape over the years I’ve owned the scope.

8:05
NGC 2359 (CMa): Thor’s Helmet! The nebula is quite obvious but surprisingly tough to find (at least tonight), in the wilds following Canis Major’s head. With no filter, it’s still pretty apparent; as it’s a Wolf-Rayet shell, it should be pretty good in O-III. With no filter, the nebula is visible in two sections: the central bubble and a section that extends S and then SP, giving the whole a comma shape. The central bubble encompasses an isosceles triangle of faint stars whose short side is to the P and long side to the NF; the short side is 1.75’ long and consists of an 11.5-magnitude star at the S end and a 12th-magnitude star at the N end; the 12th-mag has just F it by 0.3’ a 12.5-magnitude star; the third star is NF the S-most vertex by 2.5’ and is also 12th magnitude; that central bubble of the nebula encompasses the triangle, and is about 4’ around and extends S from the N edge of the triangle to an 11th-magnitude star, then extends 4.5’ SP from that star; if the nebula was a sock-shape, that 11th-magnitude star would be situated at the heel. That part of the nebula, the SP-NF angled part from heel to toe, is about 6.5’ long and ends near a small, faint triangle of stars; there’s a line of three very close-together 11.5-magnitude stars due S of the star at the “heel” by 6’. The nebula has a cloudy texture as opposed to a wispy one, more like a typical emission nebula than a reflection nebula. With the O-III: WOW!  The contrast boost is immense! (The filter may have eliminated the weird reflections I was getting in the eyepiece.) The sock bend/heel, the S edge from heel to toe, is much more obvious and the second brightest part of the nebula; the brightest is along the N edge of the triangle, especially the P part of it along the NP vertex, where the nebula is very bright; the whole nebula extends a long way from that–in averted vision, it runs 10’ from the F-most vertex of triangle and is much more gossamer along that long stretch. It also extends backward F that F-most vertex of the triangle; there’s a faint tendril that reaches over to a line of four stars F and SF the nebula that contains two of the brightest in the field; the second from the S is the brightest in the field at 8.5 magnitude, and the other streak of nebulosity extends to just N of those stars (the two in the middle of the line) by 4’, and that tendril is much fainter from the edge of the main nebula out until it reaches just N of those stars and then brightens into a “detached” part N of that line of stars on the F; that brighter piece is 3’ long. The O-III just rocks this nebula! The P edge of the bubble is considerably brighter and better defined than the F edge, and the round part of the nebula is 5’ across;  from the knot on the NP where the NP vertex of the triangle is, the nebulosity sweeps SP along the outer edge of the bubble, this is a much brighter rim, and the F side of the bubble is much more diffuse and dissolves into the background; the area where the bubble meets the toe part of the foot is also brighter where it intersects the bubble. Wow again! There are vague hints of darker patches among the bubble itself; its brightness is considerably irregular throughout, although the gradations in brightness aren’t huge–I wouldn’t necessarily call it Thor’s Helmet from a visual standpoint, but it’s certainly not a Duck either; both nicknames are inapt visually. The F-most extension toward the line of stars on the F is 0.67’ thick at its brightest portion; the brighter portion of the front (P-ward) extension varies but it’s generally about 0.75-0.67’ thick; the heel-toe extension is 1.75’ thick and also irregularly bright. With the UHC: not bad at all! [The wind is so bad at this point I have to hold onto the scope to keep it on target.] The UHC has better aesthetics than the O-III. In it, the nebula is still quite a bit better than the unfiltered view–the N extension toward the P is still quite visible; the F-ward extension is also visible, but not as clear as with the O-III. The brighter areas of the nebula are still considerably higher in contrast than in the unfiltered view, especially along the NF vertex of triangle on N edge of bubble and the area where the bubble meets the heel-toe region. In some ways the P extension is even more obvious than with the O-III; it extends quite a ways from the main body of the nebula. On the inside of the bubble on the P edge, inside that rim, there appears to be a darker strip that runs along the edge inside the brighter rim. This is a very very impressive object!–certainly among the ten best emission-type nebulae visible from the Northern Hemisphere.

Few of the remaining objects on my list could compare with Thor’s Helmet, although several were excellent in their own right. But aside from the mighty M42, the only object I would see this entire dark run that surpassed Thor’s Helmet was a view of the same object I would get on the last night of February’s observing run with much heavier artillery….

8:46
NGC 2374 (CMa): This cluster could be much larger than I’m listing because there’s a large scattering of much brighter stars F and NF it that could be part of it; I’m not including them. The central mass of the cluster is 4.5’ diameter, with its brightest star on the N very slightly P corner. The cluster is pretty well detached; it’s in a rich starfield but the cluster is still obvious as a cluster (although it’s still somewhat hard to tell where the cluster ends and the starfield begins). From the P down to the S, on the edge of the cluster, is a string of six stars; there are about eighteen resolved in the whole cluster. Just SP the S end of the string is a faint double; both components are 13.5 magnitude and they’re separated by 0.25’. There’s not a great range of magnitudes in this cluster; the average magnitude is about 11.5; there may be much fainter or threshold-level stars, but most are on the brighter end. From the bright star on the N very slightly P (the cluster lucida at magnitude 10.5) SP by 10’ is an 8th-magnitude star with a 9th-magnitude star 3.3’ N very very slightly F it; there’s an 8.5-magnitude star N of the lucida by 15’ and one of 10th magnitude N of the lucida by 5.75’. F the cluster is a grouping of fifteen stars that are brighter than the cluster members; these are in the 10th/11th-magnitude range and don’t seem to be part of cluster, but might be. From the lucida almost due F by 6.5’ is the P-most vertex of a narrow pentagon of stars that extends 1.75’ x 4’; from the lucida NF by 6’ is the S end and stem of a large bright ‘Y’ of stars; there are five main stars in the ‘Y’ and one off end of each tine; the star at the end of the stem is 10th magnitude; N very very slightly F of that star by 2.75’ is the center star of the ‘Y’, which is 10.5 magnitude; 2.25’ N very very slightly P the center star is the N tine, which is marked by a 10th-magnitude star and has 0.75’ N very very very slightly F of it an 11.5-magnitude star; the F tine is 1.75’ due F the center star and is 10th magnitude; F that tine star is a 12.5-magnitude star in a perfect line with that tine and the center star, and that star has P very very slightly S by 12″ a 14th-magnitude star. If these are all part of the cluster, it extends S very slightly P-N very slightly F 12’ and 8’ P slightly N-F slightly S.

9:26
NGC 2360 (CMa): A fine cluster! This one is 9’ around and roughly pentagonal; the pentagon has at its P-most vertex a trio of stars in a P-F then  very very slightly S arc that’s 1.25’ long; the F-most vertex is the cluster lucida at 9th magnitude and is slightly reddish. The cluster is quite rich (with about sixty stars) and pretty well detached, but the field is rich and has a lot of similar-magnitude stars; the majority of cluster stars are in the 10.5-11.5 magnitude range, with a few fainter, particularly along the P side and especially on the SP edge. The major axis of the pentagon runs P-F; the N-most vertex is yet another 11.5-magnitude star and is 5.25’ P somewhat N of the lucida; the SF vertex is 11th magnitude and is 4.5’ S very very slightly P the lucida; from that vertex P very very slightly S by 7’ is a 12th-magnitude star marking the SP vertex of the pentagon. The P half of the pentagon is much richer than the F; there are two or three dark voids or zones in the F half that may be dark nebulosity; just outside the SP edge and running along that edge is another, longer dark zone 1’-1.25’ thick. There may also be some dark nebulosity just N of the cluster, but this is less distinct. From the lucida NF by 13’ is a 9th-magnitude star that’s the S end of a 5’ long chain of eight; that star is by far brightest in the chain. N of the lucida by 13’ is another 9th-magnitude star; from the lucida P by 28’ is a 5.5-magnitude star.

9:38
NGC 2422 (M47); NGC 2425 (Pup):  A huge cluster that’s very bright and impressive, and a naked-eye target even on sub-par nights, M47 has a wide range of mags in its 33’ P-F x 23’ N-S borders. The cluster is considerably rich and moderately-well detached, like an overdensity of bright stars in the area. Its lucida lies on the P edge and is 5.5 magnitude; it has N very slightly F it by 0.3’ an 11th-magnitude star. Due F the lucida by 7.5’ is an impressive bright double that lies near the middle of the cluster’s brightest section and central region and forms the end of the stem of a lowercase ‘y’; the double consists of a 7th-magnitude star with an 8th-magnitude star P slightly N by 9”; 1.3’ due N of the 8th-magnitude star is another of 8th magnitude that’s the middle of the ‘y’; NF that star by 1.67’ is the F-most tine, which is 7th magnitude; from the middle star 1.75’ N is a 9th-magnitude star that’s the P tine [a slow satellite makes its way through the  field]. From the lucida SF by 9’ is a 7th-magnitude star that’s the F end of a line/arc of four; 1’ P is a 9th-magnitude star; there’s another of 9th magnitude 1’ P very slightly N of that star; 1’ P very very slightly S of that star is an 11.5-magnitude star that’s the P end of that line. From the lucida almost due F by 23’ is the cluster’s second-brightest star at magnitude 6.5; this star is third from N in an arc of four, with an 11th-magnitude star due S of it by 1.5’ and a 9th-magnitude star 1’ N very very slightly P; 1’ N very very slightly P that star is a 12th-magnitude star. These are the cluster’s brightest stars. 2.5’ N very slightly F the F end of the line of four SF the lucida is a small clump of five stars in a tight knot, 0.5’ long, with its brightest (magnitude 12.5) on the N end; all five of these are 12.5-14th magnitude. There are about 80 members in the cluster; these form lots of small lines and chains, especially chains of three or four stars. The cluster is boxy, but there are also outliers S of the lucida that are probably members but distort the boxy shape. From the lucida 40’ SF is another cluster (NGC 2425): this one is a 3.5’ x 1’ smear and is wider at the F end (it’s elongated P-F) with an overlay of ten 12th-magnitude and fainter stars upon a long unresolved glow; it’s uncanny how much the overlaid stars conform to the shape of the background glow. This smaller cluster is very well detached and very rich for its size, with lots of unresolved stars; it’s roughly T-shaped, with the horizontal bar of the T on the F end running S very very slightly P-N very very slightly F.

9:53
NGC 2423 (Pup): just N very very slightly F M47; it’s closer to head there than M46 after M47. This is a pretty nice, reasonably-obvious cluster, fairly-well detached from the background, with lots of small groups of three or four stars; it’s a “lumpy” cluster that’s pretty rich, with sixty-five stars in an 18’ diameter. The member stars here have a pretty limited range of mags; there are many 10.5-11.5-magnitude stars and not many fainter ones; there are also lots of clumps about 1’ diameter or so with space between them. Near the center is a bright double, the primary of which is the cluster lucida at 9th magnitude; it has NP it by 7” a 9.5-magnitude star, and this double or pair is the N end of a line of four primary stars that extends S slightly P from the center of the cluster; this line runs 14’ and terminates with a pair of 8.5-magnitude stars with the second one “in” a very slight bit fainter; the star in that line closest to the lucida (which lies 3.5’ SP) is 10th magnitude. N of the lucida by 7’ is a pair that marks the N edge of the cluster. There’s an arc of five stars P and P very very slightly N of the cluster; this arc is 2.67’ end-to-end and has its brightest star at the N end, marking the cluster’s boundary. S very very slightly F the lucida by 3.5’ is the brighter of a pair separated by 0.3’, with the fainter P slightly S of the brighter; these are 10.5 and 11th magnitudes. SF the lucida by 9’ is another faint group of three oriented SP-NF, with its brightest star at the NF end. From the lucida 17’ due F is the brightest star in the field, which is magnitude 8.5 and is at the P end of another line of three; F it and very very slightly S by 1.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s a 12th-magnitude star due F that star by 1.25’ and then due N of that star by 1’ is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s also a couple along that edge that arc F, then N, and that little bit N has a couple of extra stars in it. 

I gave up fighting the wind at this point. Giving up my dark adaptation was less an issue than freezing to death on the bluff (overdramatic? Only maybe….), so I got in the van and pulled it around for shelter. It did less to mitigate the steely breeze than I’d hoped, but if it did anything at all, it was worth it. I didn’t even wait to re-adapt before jumping in on the next object, which was bright enough that the lack of dark adaptation made less difference.

10:03
NGC 2438, M46 (Pup): One of the best pairs of deep-sky objects in the whole sky! M46, the cluster, is 20’ diameter, maybe extended P-F a bit; NGC 2438, the planetary nebula, is the most obvious “feature” of the cluster despite being a foreground object, and it’s situated pretty close to the N edge of the cluster. The cluster’s 9th-magnitude lucida lies very near its due P edge; the nebula is centered 8’ F very slightly N of the lucida. The F-most vertex of the cluster is in a right triangle; the right-angle vertex is 4.25’ P very very slightly S of the lucida and is magnitude 9.5; the third vertex lies 4’ N very slightly P the right-angle vertex and is 10.5 magnitude. (11th magnitude seems about the median magnitude here.) The cluster’s very rich, well detached, and unmistakable as a cluster; it’s well detached partly because it’s surrounded by dark lanes, especially on the P and NP edges; something there is obviously blocking the background light. There are 100 stars here, with many in the 11.5-magnitude range, lots in the 12th-magnitude range, and some of 13th magnitude. On the S edge, 10’ S of the nebula and stretching 8’ P-F, is another dark lane 1.5-2.0’ thick and may actually be + or x shaped; this stretches N-S also, with the S end of that dark nebula marked by the S-most star in the cluster, which is 16’ S of the planetary and is 9.5 magnitude. SF the planetary by 5.75’ is a little knot of stars, with another due S; the one SF the nebula is a little more obvious; it forms a ‘V’ or “duck flight” with the point star its N-most and brightest and is 1’ long per side. The densest part of the cluster lies more on the N half of the N-S axis; the N half of the cluster is much richer in part because of the dark nebula in the S half. Just F the planetary and running SF is another dark lane that runs 15’ and is 1.25’ wide and variably opaque; stars are much fewer along there; the duck flight/V pattern is on the F side of that dark lane from the planetary. The planetary is 1’ diameter and has a very very faint central star; its annularity is apparent even without a filter, and it has an extension to the N of the halo; there’s a brighter ring over a whole disk that’s gossamer, with a tiny shred N from the edge of the rim. Just outside the SF edge of the planetary is an 11.5-magnitude star. The central star flashes intermittently; there’s definitely an impression of darkness in the nebula’s center. With the O-III: the annularity is much stronger, the brighter annulus more profound. The gap between the edge of the halo and the star on the SP of the nebula is much thinner and the nebula’s center is much darker. The P edge of the nebula has a little more fuzz than the F side, which is better defined, and there’s a  very very slight bit of NP-SF elongation. The F slightly N edge of the annulus may be brighter than the rest. (?) There’s still an impression of a hook/spur off the N edge, although the central star disappears with the filter in. This is one of the better planetaries of winter, set in an equally-excellent cluster! 

10:29
NGC 2396 (Pup): A pretty bright, not particularly rich, not overly well detached cluster that’s just S of a very bright double star. The cluster is isosceles-triangular with its lucida on the P end of the triangle and the point of the triangle to the N. The S edge is poorly defined; the P and F edges have more bright stars; the P edge has the 8th-magnitude lucida and a star 1’ S of lucida; that star is the brighter of a double which is 11th magnitude and has a 13.5-magnitude star S very very slightly F it by 10”. P very very slightly N of the lucida by 1’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. F very slightly N of the lucida by 1.3’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; N very very slightly F that star by 1’ is an 11th-magnitude star; N slightly F that star by 1.25’ is one of magnitude 12.5; SF that star by 1’ is another 11th-magnitude star; due S of that star by 1.25’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; S very very slightly F that star by 0.75’ is a 12th-magnitude star (whew!)–this is the P half of cluster, plus the star to the N, which is NF the lucida by 5.5’, and then F the lucida by 6.5’ is the F-most vertex of the cluster; this has NP it by 1.75’ a 10.5-magnitude star; the F vertex is 11th magnitude, and the N-most is 13th magnitude. Due N of the lucida by 10’ is the brightest star in the field, which is 6th magnitude and has NP it by 0.3’ a 9th-magnitude star. S very very slightly F that 6th-magnitude star by 0.5’ is one of 12th magnitude. There are 25 stars in all in the cluster, which measures 8’ along the S edge and 5’ N-S, with a wide range of stars down to magnitude 13.5.

10:52
NGC 2414 (Pup): This cluster is a small elongated spray of stars that’s 5’ long P-F, or slightly P very very slightly N-F very very slightly S. The lucida (magnitude 8.5) lies in the middle of that axis; from the lucida the cluster runs 1’ S and from P the lucida it also hooks N for another 3.5’, so 5’ x 4.5’ total. The P half of the cluster is much the richer, especially the part along the major axis between the lucida and the P end; the F half is more devoid of stars. P slightly N of the lucida by 2.25’ is the P end of the cluster, marked by a 13th-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star 0.75’ P very very slightly N of the lucida; S of the lucida by 0.67’ is a pair of 12th-magnitude stars separated by 10”; along that arc to the P and S that are the majority of the cluster members. From the closer of the two stars P the lucida (the 11th-magnitude star) due N by 1’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; from that star 1.75’ NF is a 13th-magnitude star; the area between and along that arc is the second-richest part of the cluster. F the lucida by 1.75’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that forms the F end of the cluster. The cluster is kind of anchor-shaped, even down to the spike on the bottom. N of the lucida by 4.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star; N slightly P the lucida by 3.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star. P very very slightly S of the lucida by 3.5’ is another 10.5-magnitude star that has yet another 10.5-magnitude SF it by 1.75’ and from that star SF by 3’ is a 10th-magnitude star which is 3.67’ due S of the lucida. The lucida appears to be the brightest in the field; N somewhat F the lucida by 13’ is a 9th-magnitude star.

11:15
NGC 2440 (Pup): Telescope is bouncing like crazy because of the wind, but we press onward. This is a bright elongated planetary with a brighter roundish core and a halo that’s elongated P very slightly S-F very slightly N. No central star is visible, but it might be lost in the  center of the bright nebulosity. The nebula is about 0.75’ x 0.67’, with a 0.5’ central brighter region or core. There might be a few tendrils off the F side toward the S, and a few P, also extending S. 3’ F the nebula is an 8.5-magnitude star. 12’ due S of the nebula is a 9th-magnitude star. There’s a tiny knot of four 13th/14th-magnitude stars SF the nebula by 3’ and another knot (of much brighter stars; magnitudes 10-14) 4’ F somewhat S of the first, with a four-star triangle; the triangle consists of a 10.5-magnitude star with an 10th- and 11th-magnitude double (separated by 2”, with the fainter P very very slightly S) 0.5’ N of it and a star of 12.5 magnitude due P the primary by 0.67’. [I have to hold onto the scope while getting out the filter due to the wind.] With the O-III: the nebula is quite clearly elongated. There’s more distinction between the core and the halo, which expands to 1.0’ x 0.75’. The tendrils are still apparent, and the middle of the nebula is very bright with the filter in. The core region still doesn’t have a real sharply defined edge; it’s rather fringy in and of itself, and very slightly larger than in the unfiltered view.

11:32
NGC 2432 (Pup): Just S of NGC 2440 is this rich little compact obvious cluster, a pretty-well detached streak, running 4’ N-S and 2’ across the middle, where it’s widest. [There’s a very very slow satellite in the field, moving P-F just S of the cluster.] The cluster comprises two small chunks of stars: the S chunk is 0.75’ x 0.5’ and contains five stars of magnitudes 12-12.5 and a couple of magnitude 14.5; the N chunk is roughly diamond-shaped, 1.25’ x 1’, with nine stars in the magnitude 11.5-13 range and some unresolved (more unresolved than in the S chunk); perhaps fewer than 50% of the stars–fifteen total–are resolved. NF the cluster by 7’ from the N end is an 8th-magnitude star that is the NF vertex of a perfect isosceles triangle; the other two stars are roughly SP: one P slightly S, the other S very slightly P, each by 1.25’, and separated from each other by 1’; both are 11th magnitude. From the N end of the cluster N somewhat P by 16’ is an 8th-magnitude star. From the S tip of the cluster P very very slightly S by 3.5’ is a 10th-magnitude star; there’s a 9th-magnitude star F slightly S of the S tip of the cluster by 8’, and 7’ SF the S end of the cluster is a star of 8.5 magnitude. 12’ S of the S end of the cluster is the N end of an elliptical, almost football-shaped, ring of stars that’s 4.25’ S very slightly P-N very slightly F and 2’ wide and contains fourteen stars; the F side is more-sparsely outlined but the P side has a big gap in the middle; this may be a separate cluster or just a striking asterism.

11:46
NGC 2421 (Pup): A pretty little cluster, kind of a frosty little thing with a wide range of mags. This one is roughly triangular, although the vertices are each marked by a geometric pattern than by a single star: N is marked by a mid-sized diamond, the SF vertex by a little equilateral triangle, and the SP vertex by a pair. This is pretty-well detached and obviously a cluster; it’s also pretty rich, with sixty stars. The cluster spans 9’ N-S and 6’ P-F (along the S edge). The SP vertex is a 10.5-magnitude star with one of 11th magnitude F somewhat N of it by 1.25’; the F vertex is an equilateral triangle, with a 10.5-magnitude star the N-most vertex and sides of 1’ each; the SF vertex of this triangle is magnitude 11.5 and the SP vertex of it a double of magnitudes 12 and 12.5  with the brighter SP the fainter by 9”. The N vertex of the diamond (which is itself the N-most vertex of the equilateral triangle that makes up the cluster proper) is actually a tiny triangle of 12th/13th/14th-magnitude stars no bigger than 0.25’ on its longest side; the diamond’s major axis runs N very slightly P-S very slightly F and is 3.25’ x 2’; the star at the S end of the major axis is a double with a 12th-magnitude star 10” S of a 13.5-magnitude star; two 10.5-magnitude stars mark the minor axis; the first is due S of the triangle at the N end of the diamond by 1.75’ and the second lies SF the triangle at the N end of the diamond by 2’. The N ⅔ of the cluster is more populous, with some unresolved there, and they go down to 15th magnitude (although atmospheric extinction may play a part here). Four or five stars of magnitude 12-14 spill out of the F side of the diamond, outside the outline of the cluster. The brightest star in the field is NP the cluster, 11’ P slightly N the N vertex of the cluster, and is 8.5 magnitude; there’s a 9th-magnitude star (very slightly fainter) 2.75’ S slightly F the previous star.

Loren had already left, and now Dan was heading out as well; without imaging data to gather, there was no necessary duty in staying behind. I was torn—I was horrendously cold, but I had so many more targets to get to. I’d expected to be out much longer, but my cold-weather preparations had become mostly undone by the surging wind and the ambient cold. I decided to finish out the last nebulous target on my agenda and then leave, rather than risk getting sick and missing the entire rest of the dark-sky run. The remaining object turned out to be one of the more-pleasant surprises in the entire Herschel catalogue so far.

12:09
NGC 2467; Haffner 19, Haffner 18 (Pup): This will be the last for the night due to the wind, which is making things really uncomfortable. NGC 2467 is an impressive nebula/cluster combo down low in Puppis; I’m actually sitting on the ground to observe it! It’s a really surprising object, with very obvious dark and bright nebulosity; the nebulosity jumps out much more than the cluster does. What exists of the cluster is mostly contained within a rough equilateral triangle that consists of an 8th-magnitude star (the lucida) on the SF and a 9th-magnitude star on the SP that’s in the N-central edge of the largest, brightest chunk of nebulosity, which is a 4’ circle with a lane of dark nebulosity running across its N edge and across the cluster P-F; the two stars (the 8th- and 9th-magnitudes) are separated by 10’. From the lucida N slightly P by 9’ is what looks like a nebulous star/star embedded in a tiny circular patch of nebulosity that’s 0.3’ across but probably has a greater extent than that; the star in the center of that may be 11th magnitude [this is the N vertex of the large equilateral triangle] and it has an 11th-magnitude star 1.3’ F very very slightly N [this is a cluster/nebula combo, Haffner 19]. Most of the stars lie within the triangle, although there’s a small trapezoid of 13th-magnitude stars S and SF the lucida. There are about twenty-five stars here, but the cluster is not well detached (from this latitude anyway); it could be a slight overdensity in the Milky Way, although the nebulosity is quite notable. In the middle of the triangle is a smaller triangle [this area is Haffner 18, within 2467] that’s 3.75’ across the N edge and 3.25’ on the P and F edges; the P-most vertex of this smaller one is its brightest at magnitude 10.5 and there are twelve stars within; this smaller triangle is filled with either unresolved stars or nebulosity or both; the brightest in the smaller triangle is P slightly N of the cluster lucida by 7.5’. The nebulosity is brightest around the SP vertex and the smaller knot to the N. With the UHC filter, that circular knot of nebulosity at the SP vertex has more detail; it’s fuzzier to the SP side, extends a bit to its SP-to-N, and is no longer just round; it looks vaporous there, more gossamer, and the dark nebula is less defined due to the loss of contrast with the bright nebulosity. There’s definitely nebulosity around the smaller, central triangle [Haffner 18] as well. The N vertex of 2467 has a bright knot but is also surrounded more by a very faint cloud about 1.25’ around the central 0.3’ that was noted before. [The seeing just got terrible.] An interesting difference is noted with the O-III filter: just S of the star (the SP vertex) embedded in the brightest patch of nebulosity is a darker patch, like a hollow; the extension that went from the SP is not visible as much now; neither is the nebulosity around the N vertex. The O-III did less to improve the nebula than did the UHC; the unfiltered view in many ways was the best because of better contrast between the bright nebula and the dark lane. In both filters, the S edge of the larger patch is better defined and cuts off more sharply, and the nebula is cloudier in the N end.

By the time I got my gear packed up, I couldn’t wait to get into the van and thaw out. But it wasn’t until the next afternoon that I felt fully re-unfrozen again.

III.  And, of course, it only lasted long enough for me to get to the next night’s observing spot—Eureka Ridge—which we chose in part based on the wind forecast. The “joke,” of course, was that it was always windy at Eureka, but the treelike there prevented the wind from being a major issue for those of us observing in the small roadside clearing that we used as an observing site.

What we made up for in calm air we lost in sky clarity, though; we were inundated with clouds much earlier than we’d hoped, and it cut our observation short. At least we didn’t have to worry about turning into popsicles, though.

I’d discovered a new “thing” for the twilight hour, thanks to Dan and Jerry: looking for the E and F stars in the Trapezium, the mini-cluster of stars at the heart of the Great Orion Nebula. The four brightest—A thru D—were easy in even my Pronto; E and F were more challenging, and a good test of the seeing and/or mirror cooling. Plus, it was an excuse (as if any was needed) to observe M42 some more. On this night, I caught the E star at 112x, but not F. (I didn’t return to it later; I rarely did after I got started on the Herschels.)

02/19/20
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 5:47 PM
MOON: 26 days (rose at 4:56 AM; 11% illuminated)
SEEING: 6-4
TRANSPARENCY: 6-3
SQM: 21.2
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: cloud bands after 8:30 (ended observation early), unexpectedly-light dew (none); temps to mid-30s F; no wind on observing field but howling beyond treeline; quite pleasant for February
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, LR, RA (later)

7:23
NGC 2506 (Mon): This is definitely one of the better clusters in the region; it’s exceedingly rich and needs a re-look when it’s darker. There are well over a hundred member stars here, many/most just on the edge of resolution and this gives the cluster a granular appearance. The brighter stars form an ‘X’ over the top of the granularity, with the (relatively) really bright stars in the 10.5-magnitude range; there are eight of those on the cluster’s periphery forming the ends of the X, and there are a number of magnitude 11.5/12 stars as well, especially over the center of the granular background. The cluster is not quite round; it’s elongated a bit P-F, spanning  9’ x 7’. There’s a stripe or band of brighter stars through the middle where the bars of the X cross; that band runs roughly N-S. Eight stars run along the band, which actually forms a fairly pointed 1.75’ x 1’ ellipse across the middle of the cluster. The arms of the X are marked on the P slightly N by a pair of 11th-magnitude stars separated by 0.67’; from the NF of the pair S by 3.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star; from that star F by 5.25’ is another  of 11th magnitude that has a 12.5-magnitude star SF it by 0.75’ and from the 11th in that pair N by 5’ is another 11th-magnitude star with one of 12th magnitude SP it by 0.67’; these are the four ends of the bars of the X. This is unmistakably a cluster and moderately-well detached (“moderately” because the field is fairly rich). The brightest/richest portion of the cluster lies N of the crossing of the X’s axes, F the ellipse at the center, especially in the NP part of the ellipse; most of the unresolved stars/granularity is there. The brightest star in the field is SvsF the cluster, 15’ from the SP vertex, and is 9th magnitude. From the SF vertex (the brighter of the pair) by 4’ F somewhat N is a 10.5-magnitude star. This cluster needs more a southern viewing site and darker sky to really appreciate it!

7:46
NGC 2539 (Pup): A large, striking, boxy cluster with 5th-magnitude 19 Pup visible on the cluster’s F slightly S edge. It’s elongated 21’ x 13’ P-F. To the SP (just off the SP corner) it seems that there’s another cluster in the field [no–just a chance alignment/asterism]. The cluster is well detached, with lots of dark open space around it on all sides; a few brighter stars lie to the S, but it’s otherwise barren around the periphery; a prominent triangle of stars lies NF the cluster slightly. The cluster is also very rich, without a great magnitude range (aside from 19 Pup, which isn’t part of it); there are seventy-five or eighty stars, most of them in the 10.5-11.5-magnitude range, a small number are fainter but none really brighter than that. The cluster stars are looped in lots of chains. The lucida is situated in the middle of the N edge and is 10th magnitude; S very very slightly P it by 0.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star. [The seeing is boiling down there; some crud may be moving through.] S very slightly P the pair is a 2.5’ x 1.67’  ellipse that is NP-SF oriented and has its brighter stars on the P edge; it’s open toward the F, but then there’s a chain that loops F and then S from just beyond (1.5’ beyond) the F-most star in the ellipse; this chain runs roughly N-S and has seven stars; the one closest to the ellipse is a double consisting of two 11.5-magnitude stars, and that chain loops F and then S from there; that whole group reminds of a balloon with a string (which is the chain). At the NF end of the cluster, N of 19 Pup by 8’, is an ellipse that marks the NF corner of the cluster and is football shaped, with its major axis P very slightly S-F very slightly N, and is 5’ x 3’. On the P edge of the cluster, just slightly N of due P, is a solitary 9.5-magnitude star that probably isn’t a member; it’s flanked to the SP and SF, each by 3.5’, by two knots of stars, each 1’ across; the knot to the SP has the brighter stars and some unresolved; the knot to the SF has fainter visible stars and more unresolved glow than the first. The cluster is rectangular if considering 19 Pup part of it; otherwise it’s Capricornus-shaped, with the ellipse on the NF corner and the lucida at the point where the N edge bends S-ward. A number of patches around the cluster look nebulous or unresolved, especially to the S; 42’ SF 19 Pup there’s a pair of 8th-magnitude stars; the P star is slightly brighter and the F is 4.25’ F, and is the N end of a teardrop shaped cluster [??] extending to the S; this has a dozen resolved stars in the magnitude 11.5-13 range. 6.5’ S of the F of the pair is a 10.5-magnitude star.

8:11
NGC 2479 (Pup): This 9’ diameter cluster is a little lesser than the others tonight, but still quite fine. There are some forty stars in the cluster, which is pretty well detached and identifiable as a cluster; there’s not really much sense of background glow or unresolved stars. The cluster’s most distinguishing feature is an almost capital Omega-shape that’s a bit flattened, with the top of the loop to the NP and the two feet running SP-NF; this omega has about eighteen stars in it, the majority in the 11th/12th-magnitude range. On the N, S and F sides in particular there’s a lack of field stars near the cluster (but some to the SF) and the prominent stars in the field are all to the P. It’s hard to pick out an individual star as the lucida; there are many of very similar magnitudes here. F the more S of the omega’s feet by 1.25’ is a smallish clump or knot of five stars; there’s also a 10’ line of nine stars on the P edge running N-S, maybe N slightly P-S slightly F. 11’ P slightly S of the star on the bottom of the S foot is a double or pair that are SP-NF to each other, with the brighter to the NF by 0.3’, and these are 9th and 9.5 magnitudes; the primary is the brightest in the field. From the same star (at the S end of the S foot) NP by 11’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; from the same star on the S foot N slightly P by 9’ is a 10.5-magnitude star that has S slightly P it by 0.67’ a double of 11.5-magnitude components separated N-S by 10”.  ⅔ of the way from the middle of the cluster to the N edge of the field is a long arc of brighter stars that’s 30’ long and borders the N and F edges of the field; these stars are roughly 10th magnitude or so on average.

As I was working through these, I noticed that Loren was covering many of the same objects I had been in recent nights; he’s working through the Herschel 400 himself, less than two years after getting involved in the hobby. At that stage, I was still trying to track down the last few of the Messiers I needed to scratch out from Cincinnati’s perpetually-grey skies, never mind the tougher Herschel stuff.

The clouds had started rolling in, too—right on schedule. They were thin and irritating at first, but were gradually becoming a menace to observe through.

8:36
NGC 2509 (Pup): Another fine Puppis object–a dense, fairly-well detached, very obvious cluster in an area of sky where the seeing is really poor, down low in the southern muck where seeing is no better than a 4. [We take what we have.] The cluster is very clumpy, very rich (with fifty stars), and 7’ round; there’s a pretty extensive range of mags, but it’s more difficult than usual to know entirely which stars are members and which aren’t. There are a number of 11th/12th-magnitude stars around especially the S half of the cluster (assuming the small obvious knot of stars is not the majority of its extent). The N end of the cluster is more populous; the most striking feature in the cluster is a duck-flight or flattened ‘V’ that starts at the N-central edge of the cluster, extends SP for 3.5’, and then bends back due S with its brightest star (and maybe the cluster lucida) at the joint where the bars of the V meet and the star at the S end/S-most star in the V is due S of the knot at the N end; that knot is just F the N end of the V; the knot is 1.75’ diameter and has a great many unresolved stars in it (although the seeing isn’t helping resolution). There are four stars counting the joint-star on the S bar of the ‘V’ and these are among the cluster’s brightest; the star at the S end of the ‘V’ also forms the S end of a line of three that runs NF for 5’; that star at the S end has NF it by 1.5’ another small clump of faint stars; that clump is 1’ diameter with six visible 13th or 14th-magnitude stars. 7’ S from the star NP of the star at the S end of the ‘V’ S is an arc that (including that star) has five primary stars in it, and so in a way gives the cluster a kite/stingray appearance like NGC 1664 in Auriga. The brightest star in the field is due SF the joint star by 7.5’ and is 9th magnitude; it’s also the N end of an arc of four and has S of it by 1.3’ a 12th-magnitude star that itself has an 11th-magnitude star S of it by 1.25’; there’s a 10th-magnitude star SF that star by 2.25’.

I took advantage of a sucker hole (a cloudless patch that usually draws astronomers in, only to slam it shut as they’re trying to figure out what’s “in” it to observe) to the north to catch M 81 and M82, two stunning galaxies in Ursa Major (and the latter one of the Herschel objects I still needed); I also took a look through Jerry’s trackball at NGC 188 in Cepheus, near Polaris; it’s possibly the oldest open cluster in the entire sky.

9:09
NGC 2548 (M48, Hya): With most of Puppis too into the muck, I’m moving to some more obvious stuff higher up; seeing is about a 5 here. M48 is a huge, sprawling mess of a cluster just over half a degree diameter, with outliers (especially to the N) out to about 45’. It’s pretty well detached and obviously a cluster; there’s nothing comparable nearby, and the starfield doesn’t offer much competition for the cluster members–they’re very much brighter stars than anything in the field. The cluster is pretty rich (80 stars minimum?); the majority are in the magnitude 8-10 range, down to magnitude 11.5 at the faintest. The most obvious part of the cluster is the central region, which is a N very slightly F-S very slightly P wedge with its point to the N and the wider end to the S very slightly P; the wedge is the richest part of the cluster, with twenty-four stars spanning 12’ long x 6’ at the S end. The P edge of the wedge is a bit shorter than the F edge. Just off the wedge’s SF end is a tiny (0.75’ x 1’) diamond of three 11th- and 12th-magnitude stars and a fourth that’s 14th magnitude but difficult to hold steady in the poor seeing. Off the SP end of the wedge is a faint trio, no more than 0.67’ long, with three stars in the 13th-magnitude range. The cluster has no distinct shape to it; it contains lots of chains and zigzags, but no real discernable eye-catching outline. The side of the cluster F the wedge is richer and more compact; the P side may have more of the brighter stars but they’re more spread out and the cluster is narrower on that end, maybe vaguely triangular, with the F side the widest and P end coming to a point. Clusters like this are hard to describe; every star is bright enough to give attention to, and when they have no real “pattern” to them, it’s kind of overwhelming to find a specific aspect to describe in detail.

Robert had arrived later, having had a full day’s work, and was now leaving; between work the next morning and the thick layer of clouds covering much of the sky, he’d seen the writing on the wall. The rest of us weren’t going to be far behind.

10:15
NGC 2520 (NGC 2527, Pup): A much more decent view of this one than before, when I couldn’t see it at all. This cluster is Auriga-shaped, broadly hexagonal, 8’ N-S and 5.5’ across the middle; it’s 4.5’ across the N edge and 3’ on the S edge. The cluster’s not overly-well detached; a casual observer might not recognize it as a cluster right away; nor is it very rich, with twenty member stars, most of the fainter ones on the SF edge. There’s not really a lucida; the seven brighter stars forming the hexagon are in the 9-10th magnitude range; there’s also a rough knot of faint stars around the star at the P end of the minor axis. The brightest star in the field lies F very slightly N of the NF-most vertex and is 8.5 magnitude [the seeing’s fading again]. Starting with the NP vertex, which is magnitude 9.5: 4.5’ due F is another of 9.5 magnitude; from the NF vertex S very slightly F by 3.25’ is another 9.5-magnitude star; S slightly P that star by 4’ is yet another 9.5-magnitude star; between the last two stars is a long chain of seven 11th-magnitude stars. 3’ due P the SF-most vertex is a 10th-magnitude star; there’s another of 10th magnitude 0.75’ N very very slightly F that one; from that star 1.5’ due N is a 10.5-magnitude star; from that star 2’ N slightly P is a 10th-magnitude star; and from that star 3’ due N is the NP vertex of cluster. From the SF vertex SF, then F, then NF is a faint chain of unresolved stars 4’ long.

The clouds quickly choked out the remaining clear starry areas. (To hell with the Pathetic Fallacy; I like the phrasing, and it’s my blog.) Sometimes it was nice not to have to make a decision about when to leave; tonight, the sky did it for us.

The drive home from Eureka was always mercifully short. I would be making that same drive several more times in the coming nights.

IV. I went out again the very next night–after the EAS meeting, which was unusual enough. Even more unusual, I went out to Eureka alone. After the incident a few Octobers ago in which I was nearly run off the road by a white pickup truck that had been stalking me as I was setting up, I’d said I would never go there alone again. Linslaw or the spur road at Eagle’s Ridge, yes. But not Eureka. And yet, there I was, preparing to snag the three remaining Puppis/Pyxis clusters I needed before they were too low in the sky from 44˚ N.

I set up quickly; I had no particular desire to stay any longer than necessary. The sky was already totally dark, which was also a blessing. I gave the mirror twenty minutes to cool as I was getting the rest of my gear set up, and then leapt into the sky’s southern wilds.

02/20/20 
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 5:48 PM
MOON: 27 days (set at 2:57 AM; 6% illuminated)
SEEING: 6-5
TRANSPARENCY: 6-5
SQM: 21.3
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to low 30s; dewier than previous night; chilly
OTHERS PRESENT: none

10:42
NGC 2571 (Pup): This cluster is very small, extended 4.75’ x 2.75’ P-F; it consists primarily of a small right triangle and an ellipse (the ellipse is the P half, the triangle F). The triangle stars are much the brighter. The whole is pretty cluster-like, not super-rich (i.e. fairly star-poor, with twenty stars), and has some unresolved stars in it; it’s moderately well detached and less rich than NGC 2567 but with much a greater magnitude range. The triangle area, especially the P-most vertex, has the majority of the fainter stars around it (a mix of brighter and fainter stars). The P-most star of the triangle is the one closest to the cluster’s center and is also the lucida at 9th magnitude; the right-angle vertex is 1’ SF, and the third vertex is 1.75’ NF the right-angle vertex; the right-angle vertex is just a shade dimmer than the lucida, maybe 9.2 magnitude; the third vertex is 10.5 magnitude and 1.67’ NF the right-angle vertex. From the 10.5-magnitude star S very very slightly P by 0.75’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. N and F the lucida is a 0.67’ knot of unresolved stars, which is not surprisingly unresolved given its altitude. 0.67’ due N of the lucida is a 12th-magnitude star. P the lucida by 2’ is the brightest star in the ellipse; the ellipse is oriented P slightly N-F slightly S and is 1.75’ x 1.25’. The ellipse is better defined on the N edge, by an arc of three; starting with the brightest one which is 11th magnitude and is the P-most on that edge; F very very slightly S by 0.67’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; there’s another 11.5-magnitude star SF that star by 0.5’. The S half of the ellipse is formed by two pairs or doubles: the first pair lies SP the ellipse lucida by 0.75’, has components of 12.5 and 14th magnitude, and is separated P slightly N-F slightly S by 0.25’, with the brighter to the F. The more P of the other pair is S very very slightly F the ellipse lucida by 1.25’ with the brighter component to the F by 0.3’; those are 12th and 12.5 magnitude. N of the cluster lucida by 15’ is an 8th-magnitude star. The brightest star in the field is SP the lucida by 21’ and is magnitude 6.5. The second-brightest in the field is 22’ NF the lucida and is 7th magnitude and has SP it by 1’ an 11.5-magnitude star. NP the lucida by 14’ is a 9th-magnitude star. P very slightly N of the lucida by 17’ is a 7th-magnitude star that has N of it by 1’ a 10th-magnitude star; from the 7th-magnitude star N slightly F by 5.5’ is a 9th-magnitude star that has a 10th-magnitude star S very slightly P it by 0.67’; those two plus the ones to the NP and N of the cluster from a 20’ long chain. NP the 7th-magnitude star at the P end of that chain are a couple of very very faint knots of stars; one is 6’ NP and the other 9’ NP. 

10:57
NGC 2567 (Pup): A “better,” even more interesting cluster just a couple of degrees S of NGC 2571, although the seeing has now gone moldy down there. This one is moderately rich, moderately well detached, and in a very busy field; it has a moderate range of magnitudes among its forty stars. The cluster is bigger than 2571 at 8’ diameter and elongated SP-NF; it has as its most distinguishing feature a 3.75’ line of nine ≈11th-magnitude stars running N very very slightly P-S very very slightly F through the middle and making up the center of the cluster; the line has a gap toward its middle. SP the line is a diamond of somewhat brighter stars and NF is also a diamond of three equal-magnitude stars and one brighter. The majority of fainter stars are along the line or slightly P its N end for 1.75’. From the N end of the line 4’ SP is the brightest and NP-most star in the first diamond, which is 10th magnitude; S of it by 1’ is an 11th-magnitude star;  F that star by 1.5’ is a pair: the P-most is very slightly brighter, separated by 10” and both are roughly magnitude 11.5; NsF the fainter of the pair by 0.3’ is a 12th-magnitude star; NsF that star by 0.75’ is one of  11th magnitude; those make up the diamond, which is 2.5’ x 1.5’; at the crossing of its axes is an 11.5-magnitude star. 2.25’ due F from the N end of the central line in the cluster is the P-most vertex of the second diamond, which is 12th magnitude and has NF it by 0.75’ another of 12th magnitude; that star has 1’ SF it an 11th-magnitude star which has S very very slightly P it by 1’ another of 11th magnitude; these make up the majority of cluster. The brightest star in the field lies 18’ P very slightly S of the star at the N end of the line; that star is magnitude 8.5 and it has another of magnitude 8.5 4.5’ S very slightly P it; that second star has an 11th-magnitude star SF it by 0.25’; there’s another 8.5-magnitude star (very slightly fainter than the first one) NsP the star at N end of line by 12’.

Looking back at these notes, they’re lacking any information about the F side of the cluster. Perhaps I was too hasty in my note taking, but they seem incomplete.

I had three Puppis clusters still on my agenda, but as I centered up NGC 2482 in the eyepiece, I realized—from the cartoon bow-and-arrow shape—that I’d taken notes on it already. I was done with Puppis! I wasn’t sure why it had stayed on both my Sky Atlas 2000.0 chart and my Sky Safari list, but it was something of a relief to be ahead of the curve for once.

One other thing was for certain: the seeing was getting particularly poor down that low in the sky.

(A third thing is also now certain: spellcheckers love trying to change “Puppis” to “Puppies.”)

11:16
NGC 2627 (Pyx): This is the last of these low-south clusters, and the finest of the trilogy so far tonight. It’s obviously a cluster at first sight, and pretty well detached (despite there being a lot of stars of similar magnitudes in the field, some in fairly-dense patches, especially to the S and SP). It’s quite rich, with lots of faint stars; there are perhaps fifty overall, covering a pretty broad range of magnitudes, and a fair amount of granular, unresolved near-haze. The cluster is elongated roughly P-F; it spans 8’ x 3.5’, and has across the middle an arc of six stars sweeping from the F P-ward across center and then NP; the star at the F end of that arc is the brightest and is the cluster lucida at 10th magnitude; P very very slightly S the lucida by 1.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star; P that star by 0.75’ is an 11th-magnitude star that’s near the exact center of the cluster; P very slightly N of that star by 1’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; P very slightly N of that star by 1.3’ is a double: 11.5 and 13th magnitudes separated P-F by 10”, with F-more the brighter; N of the brighter of the pair by 0.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star; these make up the arc running across the middle of the main body of the cluster; outliers run to the P slightly N and F slightly N and another tendril stretches away from the star at the center for 3’ SF. From the lucida S slightly P by 6’ is the N end of another knot of stars 1.5’ across; those stars are quite faint, with one on the N end and one on the N slightly P the only ones resolved there; a couple of brighter stars lie S of the knot; is this knot not part of the cluster proper? From the lucida F slightly N by 5’ is an 8.5-magnitude star; from that star 6’ N somewhat F is a 10th-magnitude. NP the lucida by 8’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; from the lucida P very very slightly N by 7’ is a pair: the brighter is S very slightly P the fainter by 0.5’; those are 10.5 and 12th magnitudes. From the lucida P slightly S by 15’ is another 8th-magnitude star; there’s another of 8th-magnitude F slightly S of the lucida by 12’; this latter forms a right triangle with the 8.5-magnitude star F slightly N of the lucida (which is the right-angle vertex) and the 10th-magnitude star NF the right-angle vertex by 6’.

With the clusters done, I could have left. But I was still comfortable with the situation, and the weather conditions were still pretty good. I plowed on, with two more objects that I needed but still had some time to get had I not picked them up on this night. (I considered NGC 2610 a “must-get” at the time, but it wasn’t urgent like the others.) Even the arrival of clouds across the southwest wasn’t much of an immediate deterrent.

11:39
NGC 2610 (Hya): This is the last one that’s absolutely necessary tonight; I have more time on the few other ones remaining. The “second” planetary in Hydra (after the Ghost of Jupiter), this nebula is roundish, 0.67’ in diameter, with its 12th-magnitude central star (is it the central star?) off-center to the N. The nebula seems a bit brighter and better defined on the N as well; the S half, especially the SP, is vaguer and less-well defined. It’s a fairly ghostly, diffuse planetary overall. It’s situated in a field of bright stars; there’s a 6th-magnitude star due NF by 3.5’ and a 12th-magnitude star N slightly F the nebula by 1.25’; SF that star by 0.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star; 0.67’ SF that star is an 11.5-magnitude star. From the nebula SP by 4’ is an 11th-magnitude star that has S somewhat P it by 1.75’ an 8.5-magnitude star; P slightly N of the 11th-mag star by 2’ is a 12th-magnitude star that has a 13.5-magnitude star N of it by 0.25’. From the central star NP by 8’ is an 8th-magnitude star with one of 10.5 magnitude SF by 2’. The O-III filter helps quite a bit: the nebula isn’t as diffuse, has more presence; it seems to be a more complete disc than without the filter. The filter kills the central star, of course. [Clouds are massing through the S sky.] The filtered view shows the nebula larger; it might be 0.75’ diameter now, and considerably better defined. It’s pretty smooth across the face; no annulus can be detected. The 6th-magnitude star threw out a lot of distracting glare that’s quelled by the filter. The SF edge of the nebula is a little bit brighter than the rest of the rim; that quadrant is slightly bit brighter than before.

12:11
NGC 3524 (Leo): The last one for tonight; one I previously had missed on my list when I was working through Leo before. It’s easy to see why I could miss it in the eyepiece; this is not the most immediately-noticeable galaxy and it’s not well defined, but it’s reasonably obvious when you know exactly where to look in the field. The galaxy is an edge-on spiral, elongated S very very slightly P-N very very slightly F, 1.0’ x less than 0.25’. The ends are not well defined but it has a small brighter lane running ⅔ of its length and the faintest sporadic flash of a nucleus visible that’s 25% of the time. The galaxy is difficult in part because it has an 11.5-magnitude star 0.75’ N slightly P from the nucleus; there’s a 13th-magnitude star N very very slightly P that star by 1.25’, and due N of the galaxy by 8’ is a very distracting 10.5-magnitude star. From the nucleus S very very slightly P by 16’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; there’s another 10.5-magnitude star S slightly F the galaxy by 19’; that star has almost due S of it by 12’ a really striking double: 9th and 9.5-magnitude stars with the fainter P the brighter by 9”. [A bright meteor zips through the field!!] SP the galaxy by 10’ is a fourth 10.5-magnitude star that is the S-most vertex of an isosceles triangle; it has 4.5’ P somewhat N of it a star of 12th magnitude and F somewhat N of it by 5.25’ a 12th-magnitude star which has a 12.5-magnitude star P very very slightly N of it by 1.67’; there’s a star of 13th magnitude N slightly P the first vertex of the triangle by 2.67’.

My mood was a bit triumphant as I drove home from Eureka—even if we were clouded out for the rest of the month, I’d gotten through all the Herschel objects that I was in danger of losing to the advance of the seasons. I could theoretically miss all of March and still be able to get the two Herschel lists done, given that the only objects I needed were in circumpolar constellations (with one exception: NGC 3693 in Crater, which was another that I’d overlooked, like NGC 3524). And there were still clear nights on the week’s forecast, so even  those circumpolar objects would get whittled down further.

I’d started the month wondering if I’d have to wait another whole year to finish a project that had already taken nearly six years, and was now staring at the possibility of being done with it by the end of the next month.

V. I didn’t make it five nights in a row, but that was in part due to the weather. The next clear night happened on the other side of New Moon, long enough after the previous session that I’d become a little paranoid in the interim: what if I misjudged the position of Camelopardalis in the sky from Eureka, and it was lower than I’d thought? I’d already had a surprisingly-difficult time trying to pin down the galaxies’ locations while I was out at site; how much leeway could I have without losing those galaxies in the evening sky? Eureka wasn’t as dark as our other sites, and didn’t have as plentiful a set of guide stars; I set up my agenda with the intention of using NGC 2403 (the easiest and brightest of the Cam galaxies) as my starhopping point for the others, but I had to find it first. I’d seen it before at the Eagle’s Rest gravel pit and elsewhere, but at Eureka, they were still near the brightest part of the sky.

I wasn’t alone on the night; new-guy Nathan was there, imaging the Rosette Nebula.

02/24/20 
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 5:54 PM
MOON: 1 day (set at 7:04 PM; 2.2% illuminated)
SEEING: 7-8
TRANSPARENCY: 7-0
SQM: 21.43
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to mid 20s; slight dew; chilly; clouds rolling through between 8-10 PM; some haze at sunset
OTHERS PRESENT: NC

8:05
NGCs 2403, 2404 (Cam): This is the big one tonight, and all others will be starhopped to from here. I could probably wait a bit for more darkness, but I need to make sure I get all of these tonight. I’ve seen NGC 2403 before, of course, but have never taken notes on it. The galaxy’s very large, no less than 8’ x 4.5’, and elongated P somewhat N-F somewhat S. It has a large core that’s not particularly well defined (although the halo isn’t very well defined, either); the core is 1.25’ around and gradual and not well distinct from the halo, which is very diffuse on the circumference. Along the S edge are two brightish stars (cf.). It seems as though the  light cutoff is greater on the N and F edges of the halo, especially just N of the star off the F end. There’s a suspected star just S of the core which is magnitude 12.5; 0.75’ S of that is a threshold star, maybe magnitude 14.5. From the star on the S edge of the core SP by 1.3’ is a 10.5-magnitude star that has a 13.5-magnitude star P very slightly S of it by 1’; from the 10.5-magnitude star N very slightly P by 3.25’ is a 14.5-magnitude star that’s in the middle of a patchy extension that may be part of the P arm of the galaxy; that star has N slightly F by 0.5’ and S slightly P it by 0.75’ two others of almost the same magnitude (although the one to the N doesn’t look quite pinpoint; it may be nebulous); the one to the S is almost threshold level. 7’ due P from the 10.5-magnitude star on the SP edge of the galaxy is a 9th-magnitude star, and from that star 4.5’ N slightly P is an 8.5-magnitude star; there’s a 9.5-magnitude star on the SF edge of galaxy, 3.5’ due F the 10.5-magnitude star on the SP; from that 9.5-magnitude star NP by 1.5’ is another small non-stellar spot (NGC 2404); I can’t tell if it’s in a spiral arm or not, but every so often a dark bay is visible S of the nebulous spot and running P-F. A 14th-magnitude star lies 0.67’ SP from the 9.5-magnitude star on the SF of the galaxy. 16’ due S of the 9.5-magnitude star is another 8.5-magnitude star, and it has a 9th-magnitude star S slightly P it by 5.75’. The two stars P the galaxy and the two S comprise all of the field’s brighter stars. Back to the group on the extreme P edge of galaxy (the two stars and the nebulous spot): these look like they help define the P-most end of the galaxy, although there does appear to be between that and the 8th-magnitude star that’s P somewhat N of the galaxy another small fuzzy detached area that might have a couple of threshold stars or something non-stellar involved in it; that detached spot lies 5.5’ due NP the 10.5-magnitude star on the SF edge of the galaxy. Every now and then is an obvious glimmer of that nebulous patch N slightly P the star on the SF edge of the galaxy (NGC 2404); that star has a bit of halo beyond it on the F, so it’s not the exact edge, and the same is true with the one on the SP (the 10.5-magnitude star). 

Having gotten NGC 2403 picked up early, I felt a lot better about the course the evening would take.

8:26
NGCs 2366, 2363 (Cam): I expected this one to be kind of a bugger, based on what I’d read about it, and it is; it’s much like the big one in Draco, NGC 4236, only much  smaller. The galaxy is very long and very very diffuse; it spans 3.0’ x 0.5’ and is elongated SP-NF, with no central concentration at all; just a faint smear. It’s much better in averted vision, where its full dimensions are more easily realized I would have noticed it scanning through the field, but not checked for its full extent [a bright NP-SF satellite traverses the field]. On the SP end of the halo is an almost stellar spot, like a dim 12th-magnitude star in nebulosity; from that object 3.75’ N is a 12.5-magnitude star; P that star by 1.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star that has 0.75’ due N of it a 13th-magnitude star; from that star N very very slightly F by 3’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; these form the N half of a diamond whose S end is the quasi-stellar spot (NGC 2363
) on the SP end of the galaxy [a bright satellite crosses N-S just toward the P end of the field]. The brightest star in the field is SF the quasi-stellar spot by 17’ and is 9th magnitude; due P that spot by 8’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; due F the galaxy by 7’ is a pair separated N-S by 0.75’, with the brighter to the N, and those are 12th- and 13th-magnitude; from the 12th-magnitude star N very slightly P by 2.25’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that’s the SP of another pair, with a 13th-magnitude star N very slightly F it by 0.67’. 

8:43
NGC 2347; IC 2179 (Cam): The smallest of the three galaxies so far, but certainly brighter than NGC 2366 (how couldn’t it be?). It’s vaguely elliptical-looking, and lies in the SF edge (the hypotenuse) of a small isosceles right triangle. The galaxy is not particularly diffuse and is pretty well defined. The inner ⅔ of the diameter is the core, which is also pretty well defined and pretty fairly brighter than the outer halo; there’s no sign of a nucleus, though (maybe, very infrequently?). The galaxy is elongated N-S and subtends 0.75’ x 0.3’. It’s pretty obvious in the field, even with a very bright star to the N. The triangle consists of the following stars: P very slightly S of the galaxy by 1.75’ is a 12th-magnitude star; 4.25’ due N of the galaxy is the right-angle vertex, which is magnitude 7.5 (and very distracting from the galaxy itself); F very slightly S of that star by 1.67’ is a 14th-magnitude star; there’s another of 14th magnitude F slightly S of that star by 1’; from the 7.5-mag F very slightly S by 5’ is a 10.5-magnitude star that has SP it by 0.5’ a 13th-magnitude star. The galaxy is within the triangle’s 6.5’ hypotenuse, while the other sides are 5’ long.  The 7.5-magnitude star is the brightest in the field; from that star NP by 10’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; there’s also a 10.5-magnitude N slightly F the 7.5-magnitude star by 12’. Due NF the 7.5-magnitude star by 10’ is a 10th-magnitude star with an 11.5-magnitude star 1.3’ P very slightly S of it and one of 14th magnitude 10” N of it. There’s a smaller galaxy (IC 2179) visible in the field, 1.5’ due F the 9.5-magnitude star that’s 10’ NP the 7.5-magnitude star: this smaller galaxy is roundish, 0.3’ in diameter, not particularly well defined but not diffuse, with a small brighter core and a substellar nucleus; I don’t know how I missed it at first glance, as it’s not that difficult. 0.75’ S very very slightly F the 9.5-magnitude star that’s due P the little galaxy is a 14th-magnitude star.

The next target requires some explanation.

There are numerous versions of the Herschel lists on the internet. I had started with one version, which informed my master database of objects, but this one had a number of errors in it: objects were included that weren’t actual (or current) Herschel 400/HII objects, and others weren’t included that actually were on the correct lists. By the time I’d figured this out, I’d already lost some objects that I’d had to sweep up later. I also had a spreadsheet downloaded from the Astronomical League, which ostensibly had all of the required objects for all of the AL programs that existed at the time (a number were added later and not included in the spreadsheet). But this too had several errors in it. So I had downloaded Alvin Huey’s guides to the Herschel 400 and Herschel II (in addition to all of his others; they’re excellent), only to find disagreements between Huey’s lists and the AL spreadsheet where there shouldn’t have been any. So I essentially made sure to capture notes on all of the Herschel objects from both the AL spreadsheet and Huey’s guides, for the sake of covering my own ass.

One object on the AL sheet but not included in Huey’s guide is NGC 2253, an open cluster in Camelopardalis which apparently has been dropped from the AL list for a simple reason: it doesn’t really exist. That is, there’s no object matching Herschel’s description (“A vF patch of eS stars”) at the coordinates he recorded, and nothing in the general vicinity that could fit the description either, even accounting for a transcription error in his coordinates. Numerous proposals have been offered for an object to fit Herschel’s description, even the faint galaxy UGC 3511, but none has satisfied the researchers who’ve dug into the question of the cluster’s identity.

Nonetheless, NGC 2253 remains on the AL spreadsheet, and I was therefore going to take notes on the whole area around Herschel’s set of coordinates, using information offered on the websites of Steve Gottlieb and Courtney Seligman, and the coordinates provided by Sky Safari, to identify the field and any possible identities for the object Herschel lost.

9:02
NGC 2253 (Cam): One of the most difficult observations in the entirety of the H400 and HII, simply because the object doesn’t exist. I’m here examining the two primary areas that those in the know have selected as being possible sites for this missing cluster, starting with the region around SAO 13933 (the site chosen by C. Seligman and S. Gottlieb based on W.H.’s notes). SAO 13933 is a 9.5-magnitude star that marks the N-most vertex of another right triangle, with a 7.5-magnitude star SF it by 12’ and a star of 7th magnitude [HD 47215] S of SAO 13933 by 15’.  SAO 13933 is flanked to the SP and F/NF by two groups of very faint stars; the star at the F-most end of the P group is P very slightly S of SAO 13933 by 2.25’ [there’s a substantial wave of crud going through the sky at the moment, although I’m temporarily in the clear]; that group has five or six stars in it that stretch from that star SP for 2.75’, and those stars are in the 13.5-15th magnitude range. From SAO 13933 F very very slightly N by 5.5’ is the F group, which has nine or ten stars and stretches NF at P end of that group for 4’; these stars are in roughly the same magnitude range as the previous group, although one 2.25’ F slightly S of SAO 13933 is of 12th magnitude. Due N of 13933 by 12’ is a pair that are P very very slightly S-F very very slightly N to each other; both are 11th magnitude, and they’re separated by 0.67’. 

The second suggested site for NGC 2253 is the actual spot of a multiple star some have claimed to be NGC 2253. [We’re getting lost in the oncoming clouds a bit]. This consists of two multiple stars aligned roughly P-F to each other, with the brighter 1.67’ P very very slightly S of the fainter; these are 9th and 11th magnitude, and each has a faint companion: the brighter of these has a 14.5-magnitude star 12” SP it, while the 11th-magnitude star has a 13.5-magnitude star 12” NF it. SF the brighter of these pairs–and due S of the fainter by 3.25’–is a very small, slightly-nebulous spot that’s possibly the UGC galaxy some have suggested as NGC 2253, or more likely is just a very faint, tight double of 14th/15th magnitude stars [it’s the latter]; this is the actual spot Sky Safari gives for NGC 2253. The brighter of the first pair of stars is S of the 7th-magnitude star that’s S of SAO 13933, so this area has been covered; the two faint groups of stars around 13933 are visible at the N end of the field with the multiple stars centered in it.

And then it was back to galaxies for the final Camelopardalis Herschel 400 target.

9:45
NGCs 2655, 2715
(Cam): Big and bright!  I starhopped from NGC 2715 to find 2655 because I was having no luck otherwise. NGC 2655 is an elliptical-looking galaxy with a well-defined halo and a small bright core that has a substellar nucleus inside–a very impressive galaxy. It’s elongated slightly P-F and extends 2.0’ x 1.5’. The galaxy forms the middle of a ‘Y’ of bright stars, the two brightest of which are P and SF the galaxy; the star to the P marks the end of the ‘Y’ stem and is 16’ from the galaxy and is of 7th magnitude; due F that star is a trio of 12th/13th-magnitude stars in a 2’ NP-SF line: 2.5’ due F the 7th-magnitude star is the S-most of a pair: the N-most is also very slightly P; these are separated by 0.5’; 1.5’ SF the first star (the more S of the pair) is the third and brightest 12th-magnitude star. 9’ F somewhat N of the galaxy is a 10th-magnitude star marking the northern tine of the Y; a 7.5-magnitude star 10’ SF the galaxy denotes the southern tine. With the sky clearing, the galaxy is somewhat more substantial, 2.5’ x 1.67’ or 1.75’. S of the galaxy (and very slightly F) by 14’ is a 10th-magnitude star; F slightly S of the galaxy by 40’ is NGC 2715: this galaxy is a really elongated diffuse glow with not much central concentration; the central region or core is just very slightly brighter than the halo, which is much more diffuse on the N end than the S. The galaxy is elongated S very slightly P-N very slightly F, spanning 3.5’ x 1.0’. No nucleus is visible. From the center of the galaxy 4’ due S is an 11.5-magnitude star. N slightly F the galaxy by 9’ is a 10.5-magnitude star that’s the N-most star in a nice isosceles triangle, almost equilateral, whose S edge runs due P-F; from that star S somewhat P and S somewhat F, each by 2’, is a 12th-magnitude star and those two are 2.25’ apart. 1.67’ NP the 10.5-magnitude star is a 12.5-magnitude star. NGC 2715 as impressive as NGC 2655, a highly-inclined spiral just under a full field away from 2655, and worthy of its own attention. 

I backtracked to the next target not because it was a Herschel object (it isn’t), but because it was cool and I stumbled over it while searching for NGC 2655.

9:58
NGC 2591 (Cam): Although not a member of the H400 or HII lists, this is a really cool galaxy I found while searching for NGC 2655 is worth taking notes on. It’s very thin, probably a flat galaxy, 1.67’ x 0.25’ and elongated perfectly SP-NF. The galaxy has no central concentration or nucleus, just a very even surface brightness. The galaxy is distracted from by a pair of brighter stars to the N somewhat F. Just P the S tip of the galaxy is a 14th-magnitude star; a couple of other 14.5-magnitude stars lie P the galaxy, forming an arc of three; this leads from the star off the galaxy’s S tip P slightly N for 1.75’; the star due P the galaxy has the third in that group NP it by 1’. From the galaxy due SP (so along the galaxy’s major axis) by 9’ is the more N of a pair that are N-S each other; these are both magnitude 11.5 and separated by 1’; from the S-most in the pair 1.67’ SF is a 12.5-magnitude star. From the galaxy roughly P by 7’ is an 11th-magnitude star; from the middle of the galaxy N somewhat F by 8’ is a 10.5-magnitude star that has 1.75’ F it a 10th-magnitude star; from that 10.5-magnitude star N very very slightly P by 3’ is a 13th-magnitude star, and from the galaxy SF by 4’ is a 12th-magnitude star.

Although some clouds had rolled in from the west, I was still in the clear up in the circumpolar reaches. So I pressed on into Ursa Major, where 95% of my remaining targets resided—the better to maximize what clear skies I had access to.

10:08
NGC 2742 (UMa): The sky is still holding up, so I’m going to press on into Ursa Major. This is a big, bright, P-F elongated galaxy inside the nose of the Bear. It spans 2.67’ x 1.3’. It’s very diffuse, with no real distinction between halo and core, but it’s also very lumpy or “non-smooth” in brightness; if I was a bettor, I’d say some spiral structure could be seen in a 14”, and it seems as if the galaxy’s really trying to be vaguely ‘S’-shaped just out of the grasp of my 12.5” scope. The halo is pretty well defined, with just a bit of irregularity hinting at spiral structure. Due NP the galaxy by 4.75’ is a brilliant 7.5-magnitude star that seems yellowish; SP the galaxy by 3.25’ is a 10th-magnitude star that’s the S-most vertex of a tiny isosceles triangle (reminiscent of the one that “feeds up” to Pal 12); from that star N very very slightly F and N very very slightly P each by 0.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star, and those are separated from each other by 0.3’. F very slightly N of the galaxy by 13’ is a 9th-magnitude star that has 0.5’ SP it a 14th-magnitude and a 13.5-magnitude P it by 0.75’; along that same line P slightly N of the 7.5-magnitude star by 2.25’ is a 13th-magnitude star.

10:18
NGC 2768 (UMa): This galaxy lies just outside the field of 2742/just on the edge of the field but I didn’t see it earlier. In some ways, it’s like a brighter version of NGC 2742. This galaxy is 2.5’ x 1.25’, elongated P-F, and has a smallish, pretty suddenly-arrived-at core that has a substellar nucleus and what looks like (just P the nucleus) an embedded threshold star. The galaxy’s halo is well defined; the outer ends of the halo are considerably tougher, but that may be due to current conditions. The galaxy is situated in a fairly distinct but not busy field; there are a lot of bright stars present. N of the galaxy by 4.75’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; there’s another of magnitude 10.5 P slightly N by 3.75’; F somewhat N by 2.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. S of the galaxy by 2.67’ is a 14th-magnitude star; there’s another 14th-magnitude star 1’ N very very slightly F; that last star is also 1.5’ S very very slightly F the galaxy’s nucleus. SP the galaxy by 3.5’ is the N-most of a SP-NF pair of 13th-magnitude stars separated by 1.5’. The brightest star in the field is 8.5 magnitude and lies P somewhat N of the galaxy by 15’; this star has due N of it by 1’ a 10th-magnitude star; there’s a 9.5-magnitude star 16’ P somewhat S of the galaxy; those (the 9.5- and 10th-magnitude stars and the galaxy) form an equilateral triangle. F somewhat N of the galaxy by 21’ is a 9th-magnitude star.

10:30
NGC 2756 (UMa): A bright but not particularly distinguished galaxy with high surface brightness. It’s elongated N-S and is quite small, 0.75’ x 0.3’, with a well-defined not very diffuse halo and a very small 0.25’ core; it almost seems like a nucleus is visible in averted vision, but I can’t get a fix on it. The galaxy has S slightly P it by 7’ a 9.5-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star F very slightly N the galaxy by 9’. There’s also an isosceles triangle SF the galaxy; the closest vertex is 2.75’ F very very slightly S of the galaxy and is magnitude 12.5; there’s another of magnitude 12.5 due F the first by 2’, and from the 2nd star S very very slightly P by 2.5’ is a 14.5-magnitude star; these make up the triangle, which points due S. S somewhat F the galaxy by 10’ is the N-most of a chain of three, of which the N-most two are 12.5 magnitude and the third 13.5; the two N are separated N slightly F-S slightly P by 0.67’ and two S are separated N very very slightly P-S very very slightly F by 0.25’; from the N-most of the three due S very very slightly F by 3.25’ is a double (probably an actual physical double) whose 10th- and 12th-magnitude components are oriented NF-SP to each other and separated by 10” (with the brighter to the NF).

The clouds had reached a point where I was fenced in; only a section of sky around Ursa Major remained clear. But that was no doubt illusory—whatever visible clouds there were were only the surface part of the iceberg; the transparency was no doubt seriously compromised beyond the threshold of vision. Best, then, to wrap things up.

10:43
NGC 2950 (UMa): The entire sky is clouded over at this point, except here in UMa; this will likely be the last object for tonight. This is a small but obvious galaxy with a very bright core and a bright substellar nucleus. It extends 1.0’ x 0.67’ NP-SF. The halo is pretty well defined, although on the P side it looks somewhat jagged–indicative of spiral structure? More magnification would help, but it would also violate the rules I set for doing the Herschel lists; I’ll have to come back to this one with greater aperture and/or magnification. [There’s a line of sub-threshold stars on P side causing this impression, but it’s more visible on photographs than in a 12.5” scope.] The halo seems extended along P edge. P the galaxy by 2.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; there’s another of 12.5 magnitude N very slightly F the galaxy by 4.25’ and from that star F very slightly N by 3.25’ is a 10th-magnitude star; F that star by 9’ is another of 10th magnitude. S of the galaxy and somewhat P by 20’ is a 7.5-magnitude star that’s the brightest in the field. N very slightly F the galaxy by 19’ is the more N of a pair of 11.5-magnitude stars separated S very slightly P-N very slightly F by 0.67’; 2.5’ NF from the N of the two is a 9th-magnitude star.

The Clear Sky Chart had predicted the clouds rolling in, but was a little off time-wise. Nathan’s favorite app, Clear Outside, indicated that the crud would clear off within the next couple of hours. Having completed the night’s agenda and taken notes on all the Camelopardalis objects (even the non-existent one!) I needed, I decided against waiting around for the clouds to clear. Nathan, still buried in his imaging data, was willing to wait it out, and was comfortable waiting alone to do so.

So I tore down my gear and headed home, not particularly comfortable leaving someone alone at an observing site, but grateful that I’d had the few hours it took to finally clear out the “winter” Herschels for good.

VI. Two nights later, we reconvened at Eureka for what became an epic observing session with some of the best seeing I’ve ever experienced. Four of us made it out: me, Dan B (with his 16″ Dob and his double-barreled 6″ SCTs), Frank (with his binoscope) and Jeff L (with a TeleVue refractor and [I think] his 11″ SCT). Having cleared out Camelopardalis, I was much more at ease with my standing Herschel-wise; I had only about forty to go, almost all of them in Ursa Major, where they would be in decent observing position for most of the night.

The three-day-old Moon was still up in the west, not to set for a couple more hours. But there was no reason to waste that time: I set about working through some of the winter showpieces, even settling on a favorite Messier I’d never taken notes on.

02/26-27/20
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 5:56 PM
MOON: 3 days (set at 9:04 PM; 9% illuminated)
SEEING: 6-9
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.42
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to mid 20s; heavy dew; chill/clammy; some haze at sunset; seeing became the best I’ve ever seen it
OTHERS PRESENT: DB, FS, JL

7:48
M67 (Cnc): Going to take notes on this one while waiting for the Moon to go away, as I still don’t have notes on all the Messiers. This is one of the most underrated Messiers, a really fine splashy open cluster in an overlooked part of the sky. The cluster is elongated P-F; the brightest star within it is on the NF; it’s probably not a member but is the brightest star in the cluster body at 7.5 magnitude. The cluster is very well detached and very very rich; it’s a very obvious cluster (all the more so for the lack of background stars here). If the 7.5-magnitude star is an actual cluster member, it would be the lucida, and the cluster would have a considerable magnitude range; there are twenty-five stars in the 10th-11th magnitude range and many fainter, down to 14th magnitude; there are ninety or more stars here. There’s a N-S stripe of stars that sweeps across the center of the cluster; this is where the richest concentration of the cluster’s faint stars lies, and is also where an arc of brighter member-stars runs SP-NF and then N. From the  “lucida” along the N edge to the NP vertex–which is P very very slightly S of the lucida by 13’–the cluster is 13’ x 10’ (along the F-most side). At the S end of the arc across the middle is a smaller arc of three stars that’s 1.3’ end to end; the P-most star in this is one of the two brightest in the main body of the cluster and is 10th magnitude [a satellite goes spinning through the F edge of field]; the star at the F end of that arc is also 10th magnitude (but very very slightly fainter than the first) and the third star, which is 0.75’ S very very slightly F the first, is 10.5 magnitude. 1’ NF from the F-most vertex is a clump of six very tight-knotted stars that has a train of faint stars running to the NP of it by 1.5’; the knot is 0.5’ across and has some unresolved stars in it; the train to the NP has four or five stars in it. From the lucida P somewhat S by 9’ is another clump of stars that runs 1.75’ x 0.67’ P-F and contains nine stars, the brightest of which is on N corner with its second-brightest on the P corner; the star on the N corner is 11.5 magnitude, and that star is 5.5’ N very slightly P the star on the F end of the arc of three at the S end of the cluster. There’s also an interesting area NF the first clump: from that clump 2.3’ NF is a 9.5-magnitude star that’s tied for the second-brightest star here, and it’s on the SF vertex of a quincunx pattern that has as its NF vertex a faint double of 11.5- and 13.5-magnitude stars, with the brighter P the fainter by 10”; the SP vertex of the quincunx is 2’ P very very slightly N of the SF vertex; from that star N by 1.75’ is a 12th-magnitude star, the NP vertex of the quincunx; from the SP vertex NF by 1.25’ is the center star of the quincunx, which is magnitude 10.5. It’s in the P edge of the quincunx that lies the largest concentration of faint stars in the cluster. From the lucida S very very slightly P by 4.5’ is the brightest star in a tiny triangle; that star is 10.5 magnitude and it has a 13th-magnitude star due N of it by 0.5’; that star has 0.3’ due SF it a 12.5-magnitude star. The brightest star in the field is N slightly P the lucida by 15’ and is 8th magnitude (very slightly fainter than the lucida, so actually the second-brightest in the field).

By the time I was done with M67 and a couple of other bright targets—and with the light haze of the evening dispersed—the Moon had finally sunk out of sight. So it was back on to Ursa Major, with the only telescope on the field that was facing north, rather than south.

9:02
NGC 2880; PGC 26940 (UMa): Now that the Moon is down, it’s Herschel time.  This is a moderately-bright, fairly-small galaxy just P slightly N of h UMa. It’s elongated NP-SF, 1.0’ x 0.5’, and has a small (maybe 12”) bright core and a substellar nucleus; maybe the core is larger and the nucleus is the 12” object? (I think the former.) The ends of the galaxy’s halo are very tenuous and require averted vision to pull out from the background. There’s a backward checkmark of four 13.5/14th-magnitude stars N and P the galaxy and an arc of five stars F it whose two brightest stars are on the ends, especially the N end. The checkmark’s heel is due P the galaxy by 1.75’ and is 14.5 magnitude, and it has a 14th-magnitude star NP it by 0.75’; from the heel 1’ NF is a 14.5-magnitude star barely above the magnitude threshold tonight; from that star 1.5’ NF (so due N of the galaxy) is a 13.5-magnitude star which is 2’ N of the galaxy. Every so often, 1.25’ NF that last star, is a tiny fuzzy glow (PGC 26940); it’s very very difficult and no more than 0.3’ round, with a very little central concentration that helps find and hold it in averted vision 50% of the time. F very very slightly N of 2880 by 1.3’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; NF 2880 by 9’ is a 10th-magnitude star that has F very very slightly N by 7’ another star of 10th magnitude; and from 2880 P very slightly S by 10’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; that star is barely the brightest in the field; it has 2.75’ N very very slightly F it a 12.5-magnitude star.

9:26
NGCs 2805, 2814, 2820 (UMa): This is a really fascinating field, even if the H object is a dud; there are at least three galaxies here, with 2805 (the Herschel) the dimmest of the three. NGC 2805 is positioned roughly between two brightish stars: one to S somewhat F and one N very very slightly P. The galaxy has no visible central concentration at all; it’s just a phantasm of 1.3’ diameter. It’s incredibly diffuse, almost to the point of nonexistence, and very poorly defined. It may have a threshold star just outside the halo on the NF [yes]. There’s a 10.5-magnitude star 4.5’ SF the galaxy, and a 9.5-magnitude star to the N very slightly P by 6.5’. NP the galaxy by 2.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. There’s a chain of five stars beginning (it’s hard to judge distances because the galaxy is so faint) 2.5’ due F the galaxy; this chain is 5.5’ long, and the star closest to the galaxy (the one I measured the distance to) is its faintest at 14th magnitude; the chain begins at that star, proceeds F, then arcs F slightly S and then NF at the very end; the second star F the galaxy is the brightest in the chain. In addition to NGC 2805, two edge-on galaxies occupy the field, NF-ish 2805–there’s an 11.5-magnitude star NF 2805 by 10’, and that star has 1.25’ N very slightly F it one of the edge-ons (NGC 2814), which spans 1.0’ x 0.25’, is oriented N-S, and is quite faint, although the view of it is partially wrecked by the close star. This galaxy has some moderate brightening along its length; averted vision really helps, even though it’s brighter than NGC 2805. From the 11.5-magnitude star off the S end of this second galaxy, almost due F by 4.5’, is brightest and largest of the galaxies in the field (NGC 2820); this one is 2.3’ long x 0.25’’ and elongated P slightly S-F slightly N, with irregularly-bright concentration along the major axis but no real core or nucleus; that galaxy is roughly 13’ F somewhat N of 2805. The second galaxy (2814) really comes to life with averted vision; the third (2820) is by far the brightest and the first one you notice due to the star closeby the second. [The sky just got a tiny bit better.] From 2805 F somewhat S by 15’ is a pair/double separated N-S-ish by 0.5’, both stars are of 12th magnitude. 2805 appears a bit better now, with a very faint amount of central conc visible, but very vaguely; it still has no discernable core or nucleus, just a better view in averted vision.

9:45
NGC 2787 (UMa): This is an impressive, brightish, moderately-large galaxy spanning 1.5’ x 1.0’, elongated P slightly N-F slightly S. It has a well-concentrated core that’s fairly suddenly arrived at and also elongated; every now and then there’s a flash of a stellar nucleus. The halo is quite well defined. To the S very very slightly F, just outside edge of halo and 0.75’ from the center of the galaxy, is a 14th-magnitude star; there another of 14th magnitude N of the galaxy by 2’. P very very slightly N of the galaxy by 5’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s an 11.5-magnitude star due F that star by 5.5’; S very very slightly P that star by 6’ is one of 8.5 magnitude; there’s another of 8.5 magnitude F that star by 7’; those four stars make up an almost-perfect trapezoid SP the galaxy; the last star (the second 8.5 magnitude) is S somewhat P the galaxy by 8’.  S of the galaxy by 12’ is a pair: 12th and 12.5 magnitude stars P very very slightly N-F very very slightly S to each other (distance to the more F, which is the brighter) and separated by 0.5’. There’s a bright pair SF the galaxy from P-most of the previous pair by 14’; those are separated by 0.67’ and are both 10th magnitude; these (especially the more P of the pair) make up the P-most “vertex” of a small scalene triangle; from the more P of the pair NF by 2.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s another of 11th magnitude from the P-most of the pair SF by 3’. 23’ F very very slightly N of the galaxy is a 7.5-magnitude star that has a 9th-magnitude star N very very slightly P it by 7’.

10:02
NGC 2976 (UMa): A big fella—very impressive! This is one of UMa’s best galaxies. It’s mottled, not regularly illuminated, and huge at 3.5’ x 1.75’, elongated NP-SF. The halo is very very non-concentrated, not much (if any) core or nucleus is visible. The galaxy is pretty well defined all the way around; there’s a little a lack of definition along the more N edge, especially on the NF. Just outside the halo on the SP is a 13th-magnitude star; also just outside or on the NP edge is a 14.5-magnitude star; this may actually be a threshold star just inside the NP edge of the halo. There’s a kind of a dark intrusion into the N edge, about halfway along the length of the galaxy, a dark spur into the halo as if defining a spiral arm just beyond the threshold and grasp of the 12.5” scope. NF the galaxy by 4.5’ is a 14.5-magnitude star. To the F of the galaxy is almost a V-shape or duck-flight of brighter stars; starting almost due S of galaxy: 11’ due S of the galaxy is an 11.5-magnitude star; there’s a star of magnitude 10.5 NF that star by 7’; N very slightly F that star by 4.75’ is the brighter and more F of a pair, which is 11.5 magnitude and has a 12.5-magnitude star P very very slightly S by 0.5’; from the primary of that pair F somewhat N by 4.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star which serves as the point of the V/duck flight and has 2.25’ NP it an 11th-magnitude star that has N very slightly F it by 1’ a 14th-magnitude star and F very slightly N by 0.67’ one of 14.5 magnitude; from the 11th-magnitude star N slightly P by 5.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s an 11.5-magnitude star NP that star by 2.75’. NP the galaxy by 11’ is an 11th-magnitude star.

As I was finishing up with 2976, Jeff called me over.

“Did you drop something that glows in the dark?”

I hadn’t, nor did I have anything with me that would.

“There’s something over by your van that’s glowing.”

We went over to check it out. In the grass by the van’s back end was indeed a small glowing object. But I hadn’t dropped it—it had crawled there.

Dan picked it up. It looked to me like a glowworm of some kind, but none of us could recall seeing fireflies in Oregon. After a few moments, Dan put the creature in a container to take home for further investigation. Excitement over, I went back to task.

10:34
NGC 2985 (UMa): A little beauty; nice but not quite as impressive as 2976. This galaxy is largish and round, 1.75’ x 1.25’, elongated N-S.  The halo is not really well defined, kinda gossamer, with a gradual core that’s 0.5’ across and is quite bright; there’s an occasional glimpse of a substellar nucleus. Due F the galaxy by 1’ is a 12.5-magnitude star that’s the NP end of a chain of three; SF by 1.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star; 1.3’ S very very slightly F that star is a 13.5-magnitude star. N very very slightly P of the galaxy by 2.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. The galaxy lies at the middle of a roughly N-S/P-F ‘T’ pattern of brighter stars, with the brightest, a 10th-magnitude star, due S of the galaxy by 10’; 10’ N of the galaxy, maybe very very slightly F, is another of 10th magnitude, and there’s a 10.5-magnitude star P very very slightly S the galaxy by 12’.

10:47
NGCs 3065, 3066, 3027 (UMa): A striking pair of galaxies that are also within 40’ or so of a very very long skinny galaxy that I’ll get to afterward. NGC 3065 is a small, roundish galaxy no more than 0.67’ across, with a brighter but very very small sudden core and a bright quasi-stellar nucleus. Its halo is quite diffuse and faint but still fairly well defined. The galaxy has 1.5’ P very slightly N of it an 11.5-magnitude star; 4.25’ F very very slightly N of the galaxy is a 12.5-magnitude star. N very very slightly P the galaxy by 15’ is the brightest star in the field, which is 8th magnitude. 3’ S slightly F the galaxy by 3’ is NGC 3066, which is larger–0.75’ x 0.67’–and elongated slightly P-F. It’s more diffuse than 3065, and has a very slightly brighter core that’s broader than that of 3065, but no nucleus is visible. SF 3066 by 1.75’ is a 14.5-magnitude star that has a 13.5-magnitude star F very slightly N of it by 1.5’. From 3066 P somewhat S by 4.5’ is a 13th-magnitude star; from the galaxy 6’ SF is a 10.5-magnitude star that has a 12.5-magnitude star 2.5’ F very slightly N of it. From 3065 due P by 30’ is another galaxy (NGC 3027), this one a huge tenuous glow, 3.0’ x 1.0’/0.75’, oriented NP-SF and quite difficult at first glance. 3027 is also 25’ F very very slightly S of NGC 2985. The galaxy doesn’t have any real central concentration per se but is irregularly bright throughout its halo. It does, however, appear to have a 14.5-magnitude star due S by 1’ and a threshold star just outside its NP end. SF the galaxy by 11’ is the fainter of a pair: the brighter is SF it by 0.67’; those are 11.5 and 13.5 magnitude.

Sometime around 11 PM was when I first noticed the incredible steadiness of the background stars. I’d recently had an observing session that topped out at an 8 in seeing, and had thought things were unlikely to get any better than that here in the Valley. I was wrong. The stars at this moment were tack-sharp glowing pinpoints, steady as if they’d been caught on film at a moment of high clarity. I actually found myself wishing for more Herschel open clusters to explore, so I could take advantage of the conditions; some of the ones I’d done recently would’ve benefited greatly from the awesome sharpness that had settled in on us while I was chasing more-diffuse extragalactic wonders.

I always dread the really huge, detailed objects; there’s so much to say about them that it often becomes impossible to take an adequate set of notes. At this point in my agenda, I had one such object to get, and one very nearby that I couldn’t pass up taking notes on. So it was on to the sky’s premiere pair of galaxies, and hopefully two sets of notes that don’t need any further elaboration:

11:08
NGC 3034 (M82, UMa): Odd that this is a Herschel object, but here we go. This is a gorgeous galaxy, maybe even more so than M81. It’s elongated P somewhat S-F somewhat N; the brighter interior spans about 6’ x 0.67’, but the whole extends out to 10’ x 1.25’. The inner section is extremely textured, especially the middle 4’; a dark vein running across it splits it NP-SF, and is offset slightly toward the F end; the brightest portion of the interior is F that vein; there’s a 0.75’ section there that’s much brighter than the rest. Dark texture is in evidence throughout the galaxy’s interior, especially on the P end/half, which looks to have more of the dark tendrils running through it. S of the brightest section of the interior is a small dark jut that bites through halo and into the brighter part of the interior. There’s not anything “core-like” or resembling a nucleus here. The primary dark vein is super obvious, though. The extreme ends of the halo, especially on the F end, seem to narrow and then get a tiny bit wider on the ends, almost like the galaxy’s twisted. Two strings of three stars each run S from the galaxy, one from the SF and one from the SP; 2.5’ almost due SP the middle of the galaxy is a 9th-magnitude star; continuing that direction for 3.25’ is a 10.5-magnitude star and roughly the same direction for another 3’ is a 12th-magnitude star. S slightly P the galaxy by 16’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; NP the galaxy by 10’ is a 9.5-magnitude star that has an 8th-magnitude star N very slightly P it by 8’. N of the galaxy by 21’ is an 8.5-magnitude star that’s flanked on the N very slightly F and S very slightly P by 12th-magnitude stars; the one S very slightly P is very slightly fainter and is 2’ from the 8.5-magnitude star; the one to the N very slightly F is 2.5’ from the 8.5-magnitude star. F the galaxy by 4’ from the brightest part of the galaxy’s interior is a 13.5-magnitude star; S of that star by 2’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s a 12.5-magnitude S slightly F of that star by 3’.

11:23
M81 (UMa): WOW–spectacular! This classic spiral is elongated NP-SF and huge, no less than 15’ x 5’. The galaxy’s spiral arms are not distinct but are definitely visible, especially the one from the F end that hooks NP; the other arm, from the P side and hooking S is tougher; the gap between the previous arm and the main halo of the galaxy is a bit more discernible. The galaxy has a largish core, 3’ x 1.5’, and a very bright semi-stellar nucleus; the core is very gradually arrived-at, but the nucleus is sudden. The arm to the N is unmistakable, especially in averted vision, and is 8’ long from the F end. There are at least two embedded stars that are bright: one lies F somewhat S of the nucleus by 2.5’ and the other 1.25’ S of that one; both are magnitude 11.5; there’s a brighter patch of the galaxy F those two stars, from the midpoint between them, which seems to be on the outer edge of the halo, and is quite diffuse and not particularly well defined; 3.5’ SF those two stars, along the SF edge of the galaxy, is an area of slightly greater brightness, about 1.5’ x 0.67’. Off the P end, P slightly N of the galaxy by 5’ from the nucleus, is an 11.5-magnitude star; S of that star by 4.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; NP that star by 1.67’ is a 13th-magnitude star. The 11.5-magnitude star seems to be around the point where the P spiral arm branches off. NP the galaxy, 11’ from the nucleus, is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s a 9th-magnitude star SF the galaxy by 13’. S of the galaxy by 8’ is a really fine roughly-equal double (the P-most might be a tenth of a mag brighter); these are magnitude 10.5 and separated P-F by 12”. 2.25’ almost due S of the double is an 8.5-magnitude star; SF that star by 3.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star. The galaxy’s glow is surprisingly smooth and even for such a bright nearby object. This is definitely the best view of M81 I’ve ever had!

Having finished the two big targets for the night, I assumed the others would be letdowns. But this was far from the case, as tonight’s final targets—like many of the unsung galaxies of Ursa Major—were excellent objects themselves, only less-known because of the two giants lurking nearby.

11:41
NGC 3077 (UMa): This galaxy is also quite bright and impressive; not a bad one to follow up two of the best with. It’s elongated SP-NF and spans 2.75’ x 1.25’; it has a faint, diffuse, poorly-defined halo but a bright elongated core that’s no less than 0.75’ x 0.5’; the core is pretty suddenly arrived-at and is brighter at the center without having an actual definable nucleus.  The halo seems a bit extended to the NF. This is a really fine galaxy that rewards patient observing. Due P the galaxy by 10’ is an 8th-magnitude star; there’s another of 8th magnitude 3.75’ N slightly P, and N very very slightly P by 19’ is yet another 8th-magnitude star; there’s a 9.5-magnitude star F somewhat S of the galaxy by 17’. The star N slightly P the galaxy by 3.75’ is a very close double: there’s a 10th-magnitude companion 4” P very slightly S of the primary.

12:06
NGCs 3079, 3073; PGC 28990 (UMa): NGC 3079 is a great one to go out on–a rather stunning edge-on long spiral! This is a Messier-quality object that CM just missed. It’s elongated 4.5’ x 0.67’ N very slightly P-S very slightly F. The galaxy’s halo trails off raggedly and narrowly to the S, where it dies away, while the N end has a bit of definable brightness to it. It looks as though there’s a kink in the galaxy’s disk, as it’s not perfectly straight; the disk bulges out to the F and is more concave on the P. [The seeing is fantastic right now!  Stars are pinpoint (in retrospect, I should’ve looked for the Twin Quasar!)] The galaxy has a 2’ long brighter central bulge but no nucleus visible; just on the N end, inside the end on the F edge, is a 14th-magnitude star; S slightly P that star by 1.25’ is one of 14.5 magnitude; there’s another 14.5-magnitude star 2.5’ S of that star; from the last star P by 2.5’ is a 14th-magnitude star. From the middle of the galaxy 6.5’ S slightly P is an 8th-magnitude star; there’s a 9.5-magnitude star S very slightly F the galaxy by 7’, and those two stars and the middle of the galaxy form an almost-equilateral triangle. 3.5’ SF the galaxy’s center is another 9.5-magnitude star; this last star may be very slightly fainter than the previous star of 9.5 magnitude; from that star F somewhat N by 5.5’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. NGC 3079 is part of a trio, but it’s the only bright one; there are two much fainter galaxies in the field, one of which is NGC 3073, a pretty mediocre Herschel object: it lies 10’ P very very slightly S of the center of 3079; it’s also 7’ P somewhat N of the 8th-magnitude star that’s SP 3079. 3073 is 0.67’ round, with a slightly-brighter core and a hint of a substellar nucleus, but not bright at all; if you’re looking at 3079 you’ll eventually notice 3073. N of 3073 by 4.75’ is the more S of a pair of stars oriented SP-NF each other and separated by 0.67’; both are 13.5 magnitude. S very very slightly F 3073 by 6’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; 8’ SP 3073 is a 10th-magnitude star that has a 12.5-magnitude star N very very slightly F it by 1.5’. The third galaxy in the field (PGC 28990) is PsN the middle of 3079 by 6.5’; it’s elongated P-F, 0.5’ x 0.25’ and reveals very little detail; I can hold it steadily in direct vision but just barely, and averted vision shows significant improvement.

I could’ve stayed longer, I suppose; Frank and Jeff had already left, and Dan had hinted he wasn’t going to stick around much longer. I’d already observed more objects than I’d expected, given the late start we got due to the Moon’s prolonged presence, so I wasn’t disappointed when Dan decided he’d had enough of observing for the night. In any case, the forecast for the next night was also excellent, and I had a different sort of agenda scheduled for the next session….

VII. Having already finished the properly-winter objects in both of my Herschel lists, and having made a serious foray into the circumpolar spring galaxies, I had time for a break from the supposedly “serious” work of finishing out a six-year project.

The Eugene Astronomical Society has been, over the years, the beneficiary of many donations from the public, a large percentage of them telescopes. This charity has resulted in our building a substantial library of telescopes, of all sizes and kinds, for lending to club members. The donations we’d received in the previous couple of months had given us quite a wealth of scopes and other materials, but none was quite the jaw-dropper as the bountiful harvest we received the week before… the grand prize of which was a long-unused 20″ Obsession.

This was an old beast, circa 1993, when Obsession was still a fairly new company. It had a serial number in the 80s, although EAS’ Ken Martin had told me that the serial numbers were somewhat arbitrary in how Obsession assigned them. The gentleman who donated the scope—and its attendant trailer… and a rich collection of top-notch eyepieces… and a number of other fine telescopes… and books… and…—had told us the scope was bought in 1993, so we at least had a date for it. The scope was well-worn but still in fine shape, and we were astounded to be the recipients of such largesse. (I’ll post some pictures in an upcoming post, showing many of the items EAS had gratefully received during the four months prior to the February run, and all of the optical denizens of my garage.)

Dan B and I had spent some time one partly-cloudy night getting the beast prepped for some actual observing: getting it assembled and collimated, working out some of the (literal and figurative) rust from a decade or more in storage, and generally figuring out how to put it together. Assembled, it was almost exactly the same size as the 18″ f/5.5 that was the club’s previous-largest scope; the 20″ was an f/5, which brought it down to roughly the same focal length (and, therefore, height) as the 18″. It took a lot of time and effort to get it collimated—although we could get the mirrors well-aligned, we had to keep adjusting the primary mirror upward because the eyepieces (among them 20 and 12mm Naglers and a 35mm Panoptic) weren’t coming to focus on what few bright stars were punching through the clouds; we simply couldn’t get enough in-travel from the focuser. Eventually, we were able to reach a not-happy-but-working medium between the collimation travel and the focuser, so that the three larger eyepieces (we’d also gotten a 7mm smooth-side Nagler and a 3.8mm Orion Lanthanum, as well as several eyepieces for the other scopes in the haul) could reach focus with a few millimeters to spare. What we needed was a chance to see what the big beast could really do.

02/27-28/20
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 5:58 PM
MOON: 4 days (set at 10:04 PM; 15% illuminated)
SEEING: 7
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.4
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to mid 30s; heavy dew later; not particularly cold (no hand warmers needed)
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DB, FS, DR, LR, NC

It was Jerry who had suggested a “20-inch Shootout,” a comparison with his 20″ TriDob. and I was eager to give the Obsession a good dark-site workout. So the next clear night saw us at Eureka, with a good-sized crowd of observers and a number of the largest scopes EAS could muster: in addition to the two 20-inchers, we also had Dan B’s 16″ ES Dob, Frank’s bino-Dob, and Orion, the club’s home-brew 14.7″ Dob, which Loren had brought with him. Nathan was trying to image among the forest of huge scopes, and Dan R had come along with Jerry so as not to miss the two large scopes at work and to provide an objective opinion on the comparison between them.

The first round of competition went to the TriDob: it only took two people to set it up, where the Obsession took three. Dan B and I had struggled with this the night we tuned the scope up; the clamping systems holding the upper cage to the truss poles seemed awkward at best, and were tarnished or corroded enough that they were particularly difficult to get working. In the end, it took one person to hold the scope at an angle—so we didn’t have to assemble it from a ladder—and two to get the clamps set and latched. (It would also take three of us and a lot of elbow grease to disassemble it.)

Jerry and I also spent a fair amount of time readjusting the collimation and getting an idea of what we’d need to do to fix the in-travel problem with the focuser. I suggested replacing the secondary-mirror holder with one that didn’t require a screwdriver to adjust, as there’s nothing scarier than holding a sharp implement over a $5000 chunk of precision-ground glass.

With the Moon up, we first turned to it, although there was little actual comparing happening. In fact, as the night went on, we spent far less time comparing the scopes and more just looking at our own choices of target. We did compare the views of the Orion Nebula and its Trapezium through both scopes, along with several of the other winter showpieces (M35 and NGC 2158, NGC 2362, M67, etc.), but most were open clusters and not really the best subjects for a comparison. (Not without extensive studies of the faintest stars in each cluster, anyway.)

My recent slate of Herschel objects provided some additional targets, starting with NGC 3079, the excellent edge-on Ursa Major galaxy. Jerry was impressed with this one, and we both spent a fair amount of time observing it through the two scopes, making sure to check on the visibility of the two fainter companion galaxies. The warp in the galaxy’s disk was even more readily-apparent than in 12.5″ Bob the Dob, although that was hardly a fair comparison; a 20″ scope has more than 2.5 times the light-gathering power of a 12.5″ (314.16 square inches of mirror area vs. 122.72 for the 12.5″). Still, the galaxy was a stunner in the 20″ aperture, as you’d expect. I didn’t have a chart with me for the Twin Quasar, so near to the galaxy line-of sight-wise, or I would’ve used that as a test for the comparison as well.

We discovered another problem with the scope while comparing the views on NGC 3079: the focuser was poor, and it would suddenly stop working as the user was trying to bring an object to focus. It didn’t seem like a stock focuser, as it was clearly not up to the quality of the scope itself, and Jerry surmised that it was an after-market focuser. This focuser was also the likely source of the in-travel focus problem, as it must have had a different profile length than the original, and the change of focusers had meant that eyepieces that reached focus near the inward end of the focal plane no longer had enough room to reach focus with the higher-profile focuser. We needed to fix this problem pretty permanently before the scope could be used for any length of time.

The next comparison object was another from my recent explorations, although I didn’t know it would bring the whole field to a standstill. On a whim, I suggested Thor’s Helmet, NGC 2359, having been blown away by it at Linslaw earlier in the month with the 12.5″. So we set the scopes upon the nebula, and were both impressed by the unfiltered views. I didn’t have a 2″ OIII filter—or so I thought—so I borrowed Dan B’s Astronomik O-III.

The nebula burst to life with the filter in place, to a point where taking notes on it would’ve been futile. The texture went from merely nebulous to downright filamentary, like the view of the Veil Nebula through Wade’s 17.5-inch scope that night several Mays ago when I was working through the Virgo Cluster and stopped to have my mind wrecked by the view. Thor’s Helmet looked so like a photograph that I had to revise my previous assessment—it really did look like Thor’s Helmet, wings and all, glowing gloriously in a corner of Canis Major.

Whatever I shouted upon seeing the nebula with the O-III must’ve been a rallying call, because I soon had a line at the eyepiece. Everyone on the tiny field agreed: this was a phenomenal sight! We couldn’t fairly compare the view through both scopes, though, because we were using different O-III filters, and each filter would yield a slightly-different view of the object. But it was certainly an amazing sight through each of the 20″ scopes, one still seared into my mind’s eye six weeks later. (It also made me realize that I needed to get ahold of an Astronomik O-III.)

The rest of the evening yielded a lot of other spectacular sights: NGC 3242, The Ghost of Jupiter Nebula, through Jerry’s scope; the magnificent globular M3; M81 and 82; M51; M101; the Coma Galaxy Cluster. I lost track of them, honestly; almost every object looked stunning in the large aperture of the Obsession. One target of astrophysical significance that I tracked down was NGC 3109, an unusual edge-on spiral in Hydra, which I had first seen here at Eureka a few springs before; depending on which astronomer one listens to, and which month it is, this galaxy was either the fourth major spiral in the Local Group of Galaxies, or the nearest non-member of the Local Group. Whatever the case, the galaxy spanned most of the 22-arcminute field of the 12mm Nagler, but was a surprisingly-difficult catch due to its diffuseness, even with a 20″ scope having been brought to bear on it.

It was while I was swapping out the 20mm Nagler for the 12mm that I made an unwitting discovery. I tried putting the lens caps on the 20mm, but the bottom cap just wouldn’t go on; there was something stuck in it. A moment’s red light revealed the culprit—there was a 2″ O-III filter stuck in the cap! It took a few seconds, but I managed to put two and five together: the tape I had seen on the eyepiece’s barrel had been used to hold the filter in place, because the barrel was very slightly oversized and the filter’s threads wouldn’t engage. (It fit fine in the 35mm Panoptic, as I would only discover the next day when trying to figure the problem out.)

Somehow we reached 1:30 AM. The night had gone by quickly; most of us who had come out to observe were still there. Temperatures were cold but not oppressively so—I’d opened up a couple of chemical hand warmers but had hardly used them. But we’d hit something of a wall, and with a longer-than-usual tear-down due to the huge scopes, we all decided we’d reached our limits. As with setup, it took three of us to wrangle the UTA of the  Obsession, especially as the clamps had seized up and had to be released with a screwdriver. We swore to quickly find a solution to the clamp problems and the focuser issue so we could get the beast to peak user-friendliness.

Which scope won the shootout? We decided it was a draw. (Boos from the audience.) Jerry’s scope was very slightly sharper, possibly due to the Obsession’s thicker mirror taking longer to reach thermal equilibrium. The Obsession had a very slight edge in contrast, probably due to the TriDob not having a shroud for blocking ambient light. Both problems had relatively-simple fixes; the other issues with the Obsession were somewhat more serious but still pretty-easily surmountable.

I was tired driving home, but had enough adrenaline to keep alert. It had been an outstanding stretch of observing—seven nights out of ten—and had me poised to finish the Herschel 400 and Herschel II before the spring galaxy fields had even passed the meridian for the year. Another run like this in March and I’d be finished far sooner than had seemed possible two weeks ago. I even allowed myself to think about what my next observing programs would be once the Herschels were behind me. (Of course, there were actually another 1600 Herschels to go to catch up to the Great Observer himself, but that wasn’t totally relevant at present.) I had a huge amount of work ahead transcribing all the notes I’d taken, but a very specific finish line was in sight.

 

 

 

 

Down the Abandoned Heaven

I.  November began the same way October ended: with me still bedridden after the worst stomach bug/food poisoning case I’ve ever dealt with. (Protip: If anyone asks if you want to try the mastodon… don’t.) I spent the entirety of the remainder of the Moon-dark phase avoiding leaving the house—and especially not heading out into the mountains.  I lost fourteen pounds during the ten days I was ill, but have since, unfortunately, gained it all back.

By the time the Moon and sky conditions both took simultaneous pity on us here in the Valley, I was itching to get back to the scope. I had fifty-plus Herschel objects on the agenda for the winter, scattered among Auriga, Gemini, Monoceros, Canis Major, and Puppis (with a handful in Camelopardalis), and forty-two remaining in Ursa Major. If I wanted to finish the Herschel II and the Herschel 400 this year, I had to work very quickly and efficiently, and the sky had to cooperate.

By the time those two factors coincided, the month was more than halfway over. We met at Eureka Ridge in average conditions—typical of that site, the dew was quite heavy throughout the night, and the clamminess it added to the air left us all chilled as the hours passed. Also as common at Eureka Ridge, the wind was fully ahowl beyond the treeline, but all was pretty calm in our little clearing along the gravel BLM road. Jerry was there, as was Bruce H, who had not been out with us in quite a while; it was Bruce who had discovered and named Eureka Ridge. Frank and Loren would join us about mid-way through the session.  Aggravatingly, my headlamp didn’t work; the batteries had given up, and I didn’t have any extra AAAs with me. Rather than borrowing some, I worked without my Sky Atlas 2000.0 for the night, letting Sky Safari do the heavy lifting.

This early in the winter, I still had a lot of waiting to do before my targets rose to visibility. So I turned back to the Herschel III list, given my intent to eventually observe all of William Herschel’s discoveries anyway; finishing the three Herschel lists would get me almost halfway there. The Herschel III list was created by T.C. Hoffelder and has no “formal” status as an observing list—not even the semi-formal status the Astronomical League has afforded the H400 and HII lists. The H-III consists entirely of galaxies; all but about twenty of the non-galaxy Herschel objects can be found in the H400 or HII lists already. In any event, given the H-III list to work on, there were still plenty of objects to keep me busy while the winter objects climbed into suitable observing position.

11/20/19
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 4:42 PM
MOON: 25 days (rose at 1:02 AM; 25%  illuminated)
SEEING: 6-4
TRANSPARENCY: 6
SQM: 21.2
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: not great, fairly heavy dew; temps to 36 F; seeing variable throughout—wind howling beyond trees but calm on site
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, BH, (FS, LR showed up later)

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

6:46
NGC 7309 (Aqr): This galaxy is exceedingly diffuse and somewhat small, and needs averted vision for a good look, even at the meridian. It’s 1.0’ round, with not much in the way of central brightening; it has a small, very gradually arrived-at core that’s not much brighter than the halo (which is not well defined). There’s a threshold star FvvsN of the galaxy by 1.25’. [My notes say that “the galaxy is a bit irregular” but don’t elaborate.] 

For some reason still unbeknownst to me, my recording stopped before I could detail the field. Perhaps I hit the ‘stop’ button on the app before I was done, possibly while putting my phone in the chest pocket of my coat (where it lives while I’m recording, as it’s still close enough to pick up my voice over any of the background sounds and stays warmer longer in the cold conditions). Whatever the reason, it feels strange to have only a description of the object and none of the surrounding field.

6:58
NGC 7302 (Aqr): Due S of 7309, and brighter than 7309, this galaxy is also more compact and much better defined. ( The seeing is tough down here, though.) It’s 0.75’ round, with a diffuse halo that’s reasonably well defined; the galaxy has a small, brightish, sudden core and a stellar nucleus that’s quite bright. Due S by 3’ is a 9th-magnitude star; 3’ N very slightly F is a 14th-magnitude star; F the galaxy by 4.5’ is a 13th-magnitude star. N very very slightly P of the galaxy by 8’ is an 11th-magnitude star; NP that star by another 4.5’ is a 9.5-magnitude star.

7:08
NGC 7371
(Aqr): This galaxy is larger but much more diffuse than either of the previous two, but also reasonably bright and more obvious than the other two tonight. It’s very diffuse and round, 1.25’ diameter, with a smallish but not very distinct core that isn’t much brighter than the halo [there’s a satellite on the N edge running P-F in the field]. The halo is not overly well defined. There’s no real nucleus visible. The brightest star in the field is 10’ S very slightly F the galaxy and is 6.5 magnitude and slightly yellow. 2’ SF the galaxy is a close pair: the brighter component is SP the fainter by 0.3’, and these are 13th and 14.5-magnitudes. P very slightly S of galaxy by 7’ is a 12th-magnitude star that has a 13.5-magnitude star F slightly N of it by 2’.

7:22
NGCs 7585, 7576, 7592 (Aqr): This trio is just NF Hydor (Lambda Aqr). NGC 7585 is a decent-sized galaxy, 1.75’ x 1.0’, and elongated P-F. It’s much better defined than the others tonight, with a smooth halo, a small, quite bright and quickly arrived-at core, and a stellar nucleus. There are two other small galaxies in field: one (7576) is P very slightly S 7585 by 11’; it’s elongated N very slightly P-S very slightly F and is not more than 0.67’ x 0.3’. It does have a brighter stellar nucleus that’s pretty obvious and makes the galaxy look at first glance like a fuzzy star; I see the nucleus before anything else. Its halo is poorly defined and there’s not much core present; what’s visible is small and not that bright. This galaxy has S very slightly P it by 4.3’ a 13th-magnitude star, and there’s a 13th-magnitude star N very very slightly P it by 6’. The other galaxy (7592) is N slightly F 7585 by 15’ and tougher, much less concentrated than the second galaxy; it has a faint nucleus but is no more than 0.5’ round. This galaxy has F very slightly N of it by 3.25’ an 11.5-magnitude star. Back to 7585: the galaxy lies at the S end of a spray of stars that stretches 10’ N very very slightly P from the galaxy; the brightest star in this spray is second from the N end, 8’ N very very slightly P 7585, and is 8.5 magnitude; NP that star by 11’ is the brightest in the field, which is also 18’ N somewhat P 7585 and is 7.5 magnitude, and this star has an 11th-magnitude star due S of it by 1.25’. The spray of stars has its brighter stars on the N end; the stars in the spray are mostly in the 11-13.5 magnitude range.  

I’ve long said that the first sign of my cognitive decline will be my forgetting of NGC numbers. As it happened, during the course of my notetaking on the NGC 7585 trio, I twice misidentified NGC 7492—the dim, difficult globular cluster in Aquarius—to Jerry while trying to point its position out. Hopefully not a sign of slipping!

7:56
NGC 7721 (Aqr): Neptune currently lies quite near this very large and impressive galaxy, in the Aquarius hinterlands between Hydor (Lambda Aqr) and Cetus. It’s the best of the night so far! A very broad galaxy, it’s 2.25’ x 0.75’ and elongated S very very slightly P-N very very slightly F, with a very irregularly-bright halo that’s well defined along the sides; the ragged ends of the halo taper off into the background without much definition. It doesn’t appear to have a nucleus, but is otherwise a typical edge-on in terms of brightness profile. The halo appears a little mottled, and there’s a little bit of extra brightening toward middle without there being a definable core.

For the second time this evening, my recording cut off before I could detail the field—why twice in one night? And why had this never happened before?

8:18
NGC 7497
(Peg): This large, quite diffuse galaxy sits NE of Markab. It has a 2.25’ x 0.5’ halo that’s elongated SP-NF and reasonably well defined, but overall doesn’t have the same profile as a typical edge-on; there’s no brightening along the length, but it does have a very slightly brighter spot at center that’s maybe 0.25’ around (it doesn’t appear to have a nucleus). NP the galaxy by 2.3’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. Due N of the galaxy by 10’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; N very very slightly F this star by 4.25’ is a 9th-magnitude star that’s the RA vertex of a triangle, of which the third star is 9.5 magnitude and lies F very slightly S of the RA vertex by 7’. Due S of the galaxy by 13’ is an 11th-magnitude star that has 4.5’ due P it a 9.5-magnitude star. S somewhat F the galaxy by 6’ is an 11.5-magnitude star.

In my infirmity during my lone late-October session, I forgot to remove NGC 7743 from my list of objects upon having successfully observed it. As a result, I ended up taking notes on it again.

8:37
NGC 7743
(redux) (Peg): This one’s just above the Circlet of Pisces. It’s a reasonably-bright, kinda small galaxy with a classic brightness profile, elongated 1.25’ x 0.75’ roughly P-F. It’s got a well-defined faint halo that’s quite diffuse and a gradually-arrived at core that’s a bit brighter than the halo; the core contains a stellar nucleus. On the S slightly F edge, just outside the halo, maybe 1’ from the center of the galaxy, is a 13.5-magnitude star. The galaxy lies in a very interesting field: it’s  in the middle of a string of stars that flows SP-NF and then due N; this string extends 24’ end-to-end; there are four stars roughly SP the galaxy and five NF and N, and then another arc of three P the N end of the string. There are more relevant stars in the field: due N somewhat F the galaxy by 7’ is a 9.5-magnitude star that is the S-most in a right triangle; the right-angle vertex is due N of that star by 4’, and the third vertex is P slightly S of the right-angle vertex by 3.75’; the right-angle vertex is 10th magnitude and the third vertex is 11th magnitude. The right-angle vertex has N very slightly P it by 0.75’ a 13th-magnitude star. S slightly P the galaxy by 2.75’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; there’s an 11.5-magnitude star SP the previous star by 5’; S of that second star by 2’ is a 12th-magnitude star; SP the 12th-magnitude by 3.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star. NF the galaxy by 22’ is a white 6.5-magnitude star and S very slightly P that star by 5’ is an 8th-magnitude star; the 6.5-magnitude star is NF the right-angle vertex of the triangle by 11’. NP the galaxy by 28’ is a 5.5-magnitude star.

I’d been following Auriga’s rise throughout the session, and it was now better-placed for getting down to the “real work” of finishing the two Herschel lists I’d made so much headway on.

8:53
NGC 1778 (Aur): Back to Herschel 400/Herschel II objects with this open cluster. It’s pretty well detached and moderately rich, containing 35 stars of a fairly substantial range of mags. The cluster spans 6’ N-S and 2.25’ P-F, and is roughly diamond shaped. There are three basic units within the cluster: three small triangles plus a brightish pair, the last of which may be outside the N edge of the cluster so I won’t include it. Starting at the due S end: the 10th-magnitude star (the cluster lucida by a few tenths of a magnitude) here is the southern tip of a flat, nearly-isosceles triangle; N very very slightly F the 10th-magnitude star by 0.75’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; N slightly P that star is a 12.5-magnitude star; from the first vertex to the third is 1.75’. A second triangle is NF the first and is actually a diamond; its brightest star is on the S end and is double; from the 10th-magnitude star in the first triangle to the S-most in the diamond is 2.75’ NF; this brightest in the diamond consists of a 10th-magnitude star with an 11.5-magnitude star 7” F it; from the brighter of this pair NP by 1.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; from that star due N by 0.75’ is a 12th-magnitude star; from the 12th-magnitude star SF by 1’ is another 12th-magnitude star; from this second 12th-magnitude star S very very slightly F by 1.25’ is the brighter of the pair at the S; the diamond spans 2.25’ x 0.75’. From the brighter of the pair N slightly P by 4’ is the S of a pair that make up two-thirds of the remaining triangle; the two members of the pair are equal at 10th magnitude and are separated NP-SF by 0.3’; from the N-most of the two SP by 1’ is the third in this isosceles triangle, which is 12.5 magnitude. There are a couple of other notable stars in the field: 2.25’ NP the N-most of the pair in the last triangle is an 11th-magnitude star with a 12th-magnitude star P very slightly S of it by 1’; from the star at the S end of the first triangle (the 10th-mag star) F very slightly S by 1.67’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. If those last three stars are members of the cluster (and I’m not sure), then the cluster spans 8’ major axis.


In the background, the other observers were talking about the St. Louis Arch; Bruce had spent considerable time in St. Louis, and knew the city well. Interestingly, at least two members of the club also had gone to SIUC, if decades earlier than Mrs. Caveman and I’d been there.

9:23
NGC 1883 (Aur): This cluster is just slightly NE of Capella and really tricky, due to being in the area just above the Eugene light dome; it deserves a later look but I still need to observe it now. It’s exceedingly rich but most of the stars are very faint, below the level of resolvability. It’s obviously a cluster, but it’s pretty hard to judge its detachment from the Milky Way because of its faintness. The cluster is elongated roughly N-S, 4.0’ x 2.0’, with a 10th-magnitude star on the SP corner that’s considerably brighter than anything else in the cluster; this star is probably a foreground object. There are a smattering of resolved stars visible in the cluster, perhaps nine or ten, and most of them in the 13.5/14.5-magnitude range; the second-brightest is toward the NF corner of the majority of the cluster and is 12.5 magnitude; this star is N slightly F the lucida by 3.75’, and may mark the F part of the N edge of the cluster proper; there’s a star N very very slightly P that one by 2’ that looks like some of the cluster’s background glow reaches it, so that star might mark the true corner of the cluster. Due F the lucida by 1.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star, and that one and the lucida mark the S edge of the cluster. NF the cluster is a line of eight stars extending F slightly S-P slightly N; the star in the geographic middle of that line (which spans 15’) is 11’ N slightly F the lucida and is 10.5 magnitude; the stars on the ends of that line are 10.5 magnitude. N very slightly P the lucida by 22’ is the brightest in the field (OK, a bit outside the field), which is 8th magnitude.

9:45
NGC 1907 (Aur): Another nice one, this cluster is down by Auriga’s Minnow asterism. It’s a very rich, well-detached cluster that is very small, within a larger framework of possible cluster members. The “main body” of cluster is 1.75’ round, while the  whole is about 5’; the main body contains the bulk of the cluster members and almost all the fainter ones [the seeing turned to crap suddenly]. There’s a great mag range here only
if the two equal-magnitude stars to the S slightly F edge are cluster members; I suspect they aren’t. The main blot of stars has about 30 stars in it of the 12th-magnitude and fainter variety; there are also a couple of stars N very slightly P the blot that seem to be separated by darkness from the main chunk (either by nebulosity or lack of stars); the brightest of these is 11.5 magnitude; 3.25’ S very very slightly F the brightest star in the main body of the cluster is a 10th-magnitude star with another of equal magnitude 0.75’ F very very slightly S; between this last star and the 11.5-magnitude star is about 5.25’. P slightly N of the main body of cluster by 17’ is the brightest in the field at 6th magnitude; this star is slightly yellow. F very slightly N of the cluster by 20’ is a 7th-magnitude star; SF the cluster by 25’ is another 7th-magnitude star. Due N of the cluster by 30’ is a very large, much looser open cluster (M38).

10:04
NGC 2126 (Aur): This arrowhead-shaped cluster reminds me of a smaller version of NGC 6664 in Scutum. It’s pretty well detached and moderately rich, with about 25 stars resolved over a very faint background glow; there are obviously a number of unresolved stars here, but their presence is weakened by the skyglow from Eugene to the northeast. Most striking about the cluster is the presence of a 6th-magnitude star, much brighter than any of the other cluster members; if this star is a member, then the cluster has a great magnitude range, down to the unresolved level, with at least half of the members in the 10.5/11.5-magnitude range. The cluster runs 10’ N-S; it’s 4’ wide at the N end and comes to a point at the S. The lucida is the second star from the N on F edge of triangle; due N of this star by 1.3’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; due P that star by 1.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; P very very slightly N of that star by 2.25’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; due S of that star by 3.75’ is another 11.5-magnitude star; S very very slightly F that star by 4.75’ is an 11.5-magnitude star with another 11.5-magnitude star S very very slightly F by 0.75’; that last star is the S-most in the cluster; from that star N somewhat F by 3.75’ is an 11.5-magnitude star with another of 11.5 magnitude due N by 0.5’; from that second 11.5-magnitude star N very very slightly F by 3.25’ is the lucida. From the lucida due F by 20’ is an 8.5-magnitude star. From the lucida 21’ P very slightly N is an 8th-magnitude star which is the NF vertex of a right triangle that’s parallel to the cluster but pointed S; the 8th-magnitude star is the right-angle vertex of the triangle; almost due P that star by 2.25’ is a 9th-magnitude star; from the right-angle vertex almost due S by 5’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. From the lucida 34’ P very very slightly N is a slightly orange/yellow 6th-magnitude star.

10:27
NGC 2192 (Aur): This one is another very rich, faint, somewhat difficult to resolve cluster. It’s quite obviously a cluster but not very well detached; it’s exceedingly rich, with many stars beyond resolution–there are at least sixty stars and probably many more, but only fifteen or twenty are resolved. These are of 13th magnitude and fainter, with the majority around 14th magnitude and the remainder unresolved. There’s not a great range of magnitudes here. The cluster runs SP-NF, 7’ x 5.5’ with an extension or knot of unresolved stars off the SF of the main cluster extending the cluster to 7’ x 6’; averted vision might reveal a few starlight grains among the glow of the knot. The brightest cluster member is on the S-most corner and is 12.5 magnitude, with a 14th-magnitude star F very very slightly S by 0.75’; the second-brightest is on the SP corner and is just a little bit fainter than the lucida, maybe 12.75 magnitude. The brightest star in the field, at 7.5 magnitude, lies SP the cluster, about 13’ from the lucida; also SF the lucida by 9’ is an 8.5-magnitude star; there’s another of 7.5 magnitude that’s quite reddish due N of the lucida by 9’, and that star is at the P end of an arc of seven stars that hooks N then NP at the F end; the 7.5-magnitude star to the N of the lucida has F very slightly S it by 2.75’ a 10th-magnitude star; from that star F very very slightly S by 2.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star; these are the three brightest and P-most in the arc. This cluster needs better conditions to stand out–current ones aren’t good enough for the cluster, which isn’t getting any clearer as it rises, as one would hope.


10:45
NGC 2281 (Aur): This one is different than the other clusters tonight–it’s quite bright, very obvious, well detached, and not as rich as the others, but it’s an attractive cluster anyway. It’s quite average in size by comparison and doesn’t have a great range of magnitudes at all. The cluster is elongated mostly P-F, most of the stars forming a kind of old-style rocketship shape (shades of NGC 1980 in Orion); the most obvious feature here is a small diamond of stars toward the P end of the rocketship. Of the actual cluster itself, the main body spans 7’, comes to a point at the P end, and is 3.75’ wide at the F end; from the rocketship (the main body of the cluster) there are tendrils reaching N to a much-brighter star, and a small clump of to the S of the rocketship; if all this is part of the cluster, then the cluster covers 12’ P-F and 14’ N-S. The diamond that serves as the head of the rocket is marked by six stars (the two F-most are doubles/pairs); the P-most star in the rocket is 9th magnitude; NF that star by 0.75’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; due F that star by 0.75’ is another of 9th magnitude, which has a 12th-magnitude star 8” F very slightly N of it; from the primary of that pair SP by 0.75’ is an 11th-magnitude star that has a 12th-magnitude star 0.25’ F very very slightly S; the primary of that pair is 0.75’ due F the first vertex of the diamond, and the diamond spans 1.25’ x 0.67’, with its major axis running SP-NF and its minor axis NP-SF. From the F-most vertex (the 9th/12th-magnitude pair) of that diamond, F very very slightly S by 1.5’, is a 9.5-magnitude star that’s the P-most vertex of an isosceles triangle whose sides are 3.25’ long, with the S-most side 2.5’ long; this triangle makes up the rest of the body of the rocket, with its NF vertex a double of 11th and 11.5-magnitude stars, the brighter SP the fainter by 12”; the SF vertex of the triangle is marked by the cluster lucida, which is 9th magnitude; that triangle contains nine stars counting the double as one, so there are fifteen in all comprising the rocketship. 1.5’ P very very slightly N of the P-most star in the diamond is an 11th-magnitude star that forms the “needle” of the rocket. From the minor axis of the diamond N-ward is a stream of eight stars that stretch 10’ N; another starstream intersects the first at the N end and stretches SP by 9’; these two intersect just S of a 7.5-magnitude star that’s 14’ N of the star at the P tip of the diamond. If the N-ward arcs and the clump to the S are part of the cluster, there are 30-35 stars here; otherwise, there are only about sixteen.


One of the few joys about winter observing—aside from the glorious profusion of bright deep-sky objects and the subtle beauty of the Winter Milky Way—is the early fall of darkness. It was 11:00 PM when I finished the notes for my final object of the evening, but we’d put in more than four hours’ observing already. The dampness and cold (and the knowledge that the Moon’s rise would be curtailing our session in a few hours anyway) kept us from staying the whole available time. After an hour’s worth of picking through the early-winter showpieces, we called it a night. With the monthly EAS meeting the next night, we made no real plans to come back out.

 

II.  I spent the day of the EAS meeting checking the weather—the forecast looked promising late, which would be perfect for us to hold the meeting and then hop/skip/jump over to Eureka Ridge afterward. To make things even more interesting, the media had been playing up the Alpha Monocerotid meteor “storm,” which was supposed to happen that night and that night only (shades of the Camelopardalid meteor storm of 2014… with the same eventual result).

The added advantage was that I could start work on Herschels right away, as Auriga and Gemini would already be in prime position by the time we got there. The main disadvantages—a shorter night and setting up in the dark—were inconsequential. I thought I’d finished Auriga and Gemini the night before, only to find that my lists had let me down again; whatever versions of the Herschel lists I’d started out using (having found them on the Internet), they were inaccurate and/or incomplete, and this meant that I had to go over all of my observations to weed out the objects I still legitimately needed to see, and to eliminate those that were on the lists by mistake. I crosschecked my lists in Sky Safari, using Alvin Huey’s excellent guides to the Herschel objects as the base, and turned up several more in the Auriga/Gemini region that I still hadn’t covered. My agenda for the night was set. And after the meeting and a short delay to check on the Alpha Monocerotids, I headed home to load up and set off for Eureka. (As I needed to drop my father-in-law at home after the meeting, I didn’t load up ahead of the meeting—especially to avoid leaving all of my gear in the van in the unattended Science Center parking lot.)

We got to Eureka a little after 10 PM. Aside from me and Jerry, we also had a newcomer to the group, a younger fellow named Nathan who was working quite intently on his astrophotography.

11/21-11/22/19 
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 4:41 PM
MOON: 26 days (rose at 2:17 AM; 15%  illuminated)
SEEING: 6
TRANSPARENCY: 6
SQM: 21.2
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: better than previous night, no wind, fairly heavy dew; temps to 32 F˚
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, Nathan (astrophotog)

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

11:27
NGC 1857 (Aur): I missed this one yesterday, as it wasn’t on the version of the Herschel lists I was working from, along with about seven others in Auriga and Gemini. It’s an attractive cluster that’s moderately detached and pretty rich, with  sixty stars; there’s a really huge range because there’s a very bright star in the middle of the cluster–the average magnitude is 12th/13th, but that star is 7.5 magnitude. The cluster is kinda crab-shaped; it’s elongated N slightly P-S slightly F and arcs to the P in a large arc; toward the middle of the cluster it’s 5’ wide, but it’s 6’ wide along the N end and 3.5’ wide at the S end. On the F side of the cluster, there’s a trio of brighter stars in the 10.5/11th-magnitude range; the N-most of these is F the lucida by 2’ and is 10.5 magnitude; due S of that one by 1.5’ is another of 10.5 magnitude; and 1.75’ S very very slightly F of the second 10.5-magnitude star is a 12th-magnitude star. 3’ P slightly S of that 12th-magnitude star is an 11th-magnitude star which marks the S end of the cluster; P it and  very slightly N by 3.3’ is a 12.5-magnitude star that’s the SP end of the arc that makes up the P side of the cluster; that arc extends NF then N and then NP; at the NP end of the arc is a 9th-magnitude star that is 3.25’ NP the lucida. The majority of the brighter stars in the cluster seem clustered within 1’ of the lucida, esp. on the P and S sides of it. N of the lucida on the N end of the cluster is another small arc (3.5’ long) that starts N of the N-most star in the arc on the P side and then sweeps NP from there; there are five stars in this second arc, all in the 13.5/14th-magnitude range. The brightest star in the field may be the lucida; NP the lucida by 18’ is another star of 7.5 magnitude. Due N of the cluster is a small, almost-equilateral triangle of brighter stars; the S-most is due N of the lucida by 13’ and is 10th magnitude; 1’ NF that star is a 9th-magnitude star; 1.3’ NP that star is a 10th-magnitude star; these comprise the triangle. 18’ due P the lucida is an 8th-magnitude star.


11:52
NGC 1931, Sh 2-237
(Aur): Supposedly a nebula/cluster combination, but there’s almost no cluster. The nebula is fairly bright quite obvious; it looks almost like an elliptical galaxy with an embedded pair of stars. Without a filter, it’s 1.25’ SP-NF x 0.67’, with a very close trio of stars within; the brightest (which is 11.5 magnitude) is to the NF of the second-brightest (which is 12th magnitude) by 8”; the other star is NP the brighter by 10” and is 14th magnitude–perhaps this is a triple star? SP the nebula by 2.67’ from the brightest of the trio is a 12th-magnitude star. Due S of the brightest of the trio by 3.75’ is the F end of a line P-F of five stars; the star at the F end of that line is 11th magnitude, and there’s another of 11th magnitude at the P end of that line. Due P the nebula by 5.75’ is an 11th-magnitude star. Due F the nebula by 2.75’ is an 11th-magnitude star; N very very slightly F that star by 2.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star; S of the 11th-magnitude star by 5.25’ is another 11th-magnitude star, which is also 4.75’ SF the nebula. P very very slightly S of the nebula by 14’ is the brightest star in the field, which is magnitude 7.5 and slightly reddish (maybe not, it may be white–damned colorblindness!); NF the nebula by 15’ is an 8th-magnitude star. With the UHC filter, the view is not much better at all; any improvement to the nebula is very very slight. There may be a little bit of nebulosity mixed amongst the stars in the line to the S (maybe not). The OIII is also of minimal benefit.

12:18
NGC 2266 (Gem): With this really fine little cluster, I’m finished with Auriga. The cluster is roughly round, about 5.5’ diameter, well detached, and very rich (sixty stars minimum). On the SP corner is the cluster lucida, which is 9th magnitude; it’s the P slightly S end of an arc of seven stars that bends F very slightly N and sweeps across the width of the cluster: from the lucida NF by 0.75’ is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s a 10.5-magnitude star 1’ F very slightly N that second star; then there’s a break in the arc of 1.25’ and then a very small (0.25’) clump of three or four 13th/14th-magnitude stars; F the clump by 0.75’ is a 12.5-magnitude star that’s the P of three or four of the same mag bunched tightly together in a 0.5’ line; those make up the F end of that arc. The majority (75%) of the cluster stars are N or N slightly P that arc. There’s a pretty great magnitude range here–lots of unresolved stars, up to the magnitude 9 lucida, with an average magnitude of 13.5 or so. Of the cluster itself, the brighter stars are arranged into a rounded five-point star pattern, with the F part of the arc as one of the arms; the part to the P as one of the feet; the top point to the N very very slightly F of the lucida; all in a rough approximation of a star shape. Due F cluster by 4.5’, F the F end of that arc, is a 9.5-magnitude star; N very very slightly P that star by 3.5’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; there’s a 9.5-magnitude star N of that star by 5.5’. There are three other stars forming a triangle N of the N end of the cluster; 4.75’ N very very slightly P the lucida is a 10.5-magnitude star; due N of that star by 6’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; there’s a 10th-magnitude star F slightly S of that star by 6.5’. This is an excellent cluster!


12:37
NGC 2331
(Gem): This is a change of pace from the smaller, fainter clusters; it’s a pretty poor, not-well-detached cluster which could be a denser Milky Way condensation. The cluster is bright, very loose, and not overly-rich, with 25+ stars in it. The average brightness is magnitude 11.5, and the majority of member stars fall within one magnitude of that. It’s a mostly-triangular cluster which has its brightest star (10th magnitude) on the due N end. The cluster is oriented due N-S x P-F, with the S edge running P-F; the S edge and perpendicular N-S axis are both 11’ long, so the triangle is pretty equilateral, and the S edge has as its SF vertex a small circlet of stars. The SP vertex is 10.5 magnitude. The circlet marking the SF vertex is 1.25’ P-F x 0.67’ N-S, and its brightest stars (of six or seven) are on the N and P part of the arc that makes up the circlet; the fainter stars are S and F. In the middle of the cluster where the axes meet, due F the SP vertex by 5.25’, is the brighter of a double/pair which has the brighter NP the fainter by 0.3’; those are 11th and 12th magnitude. The majority of the cluster members are about halfway along the P edge; here are seven/eight stars, plus four on the interior of the triangle that form a line along the N-S axis. On the F edge, starting from the N and sweeping F, then SF, and then F very very slightly N again, is an arc of five stars (counting the star at the N) that sweeps F and SF; there are two more stars from the SF end of the arc F very very slightly N from there; the arc itself (containing six stars including the lucida) is 8.5’/9’ end-to-end and then runs 2.75’ from the S end of the arc along where it curves F very very slightly N with the last two stars. From the lucida P slightly S by 8’ is another 10th-magnitude star that’s just a shade fainter than the lucida, but this star may or may not be a member of the cluster; 4.25’ S of that star by 4.25’ is the SP end of another arc that’s only 2’ end-to-end and has four stars; this arc bends from that brightest star N, NF, then due F. There’s an interesting pattern of stars in the cluster but it’s not really obvious, and the circlet itself could be seen as a separate cluster.

At some point in the evening, we hit 32˚ F, but the night was drier and felt less cold than the previous night. We also saw a brilliant, long-lasting meteor—one that could very easily have been one of the Alpha Monocerotids, judging from its trajectory, but the hoped-for meteor storm was otherwise a complete bust.

12:51
NGC 2371-2 (Gem): Time for another change of pace! This is one of the two obvious planetaries in Gemini, and the less-famous of the two. It’s very easily seen as double-lobed, like M76, only the distinction between the lobes is more distinct. The two lobes are oriented SP-NF, but the one to the SP is better defined than the other; at first glance, this could be a pair of interacting galaxies. The central region of NGC 2371 (the SP lobe) is brighter and it almost seems as if the central star should be in this part; if 2371 was a galaxy, it might be considered to have a brighter “core” than 2372. (I don’t actually see anything that might be the central star; there’s nothing between the two lobes.) The two components are no more than 0.3’ around each, with 2372 being much fuzzier, more diffuse, and less concentrated than 2371–especially along the N edge, where it looks like it “breaks up”.  9’ S very slightly P the nebula is the second-brightest star in the field at 10th magnitude; that star is the N-most vertex of a small isosceles triangle whose long side runs roughly N-S; from that star due S by 2’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; from the 10th-magnitude star S slightly F by 1.3’ is a 12th-magnitude star that finishes the triangle. P very very slightly N of 2371 by 4.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; P very very slightly N of that star by 3’ is the F-most vertex of a small near-parallelogram oriented SP-NF and spanning 3.25’ x 1.25’; N very very slightly P the nebula by 2’ is the brighter of a double/pair with the 12.5-magnitude brighter component NF a 14th-magnitude star by 15”. The brightest star in the field is N slightly F the nebula by 18’ and is 9.5 magnitude. The OIII filter does quite a bit to enhance the view; there’s a little more central definition to the NF component, a little more brightening, and more of a sense of unity to the two lobes; an outer halo surrounds them together, but they’re even more separate in a way (as the space between the two is darker and more distinct); the whole object needs much more magnification. The wispiness to the N edge of 2372 is more apparent, and perhaps “branched” a little. The core region of 2371 is really bright with the filter; if I didn’t know better, I’d say central star is located there because it’s that much brighter. With the filter, the F edge of 2372 is wispier, and at moments there’s a faint streamer that runs F 2372. I’ve seen this nebula a couple of times before, but this is certainly the best look I’ve had.

1:15
NGC 2392 (Gem): This one’s the biggie for the night: The Eskimo Nebula. One of the brightest of all planetaries, and man, is the central star is just right there. (I’d call it 11th magnitude, but it could be even brighter.) The nebula is 0.75’ diameter, very much round, and very wispy along the edge. The ”face” itself is not visible at this magnification, but there are hints of irregularity of brightness; the central half of the diameter around the central star is irregularly-bright. The nebula is distinctly bluish, even to my largely colorblind eyes–it’s not bright blue, but definitely a detectable blue hue. NGC 1535 in Eridanus reminds me a lot of 2392 in shape, size, and tint. N of the nebula by 1.75’ (measuring from the central star) is an 8.5-magnitude star. P somewhat N of the nebula by 1.5’ is a 13th-magnitude star; the nebula and the two stars form a nice isosceles triangle. From the nebula 16’ F very very slightly S is the brightest star in the field, which is 7.5 magnitude. P slightly S of the nebula by 17’ is a 9.5-magnitude star. There’s an interesting bent line of stars 3.75’ long in the field; the F end of this line is roughly N of the nebula by 13’; that star is 11th magnitude; the third (and faintest) star in the line toward P (so the second in from the P end) is a little more N than the others; the line extends from the F-most star P slightly S, with the second star just a bit N of that line. With the OIII: WOW! The filter kills the little star to the NP of the nebula; central star is still visible, even though the filter “brightens” the interior of the nebula. Through the filter, the outer edge of the nebula is not as perfectly round; it’s slightly irregular; the F edge seems “scalloped,” not like there’s a bite out of it but more maybe a “caved-in” appearance. The nebula’s still slightly under 1’ diameter; its size didn’t really increase; but the outer edge became more diffuse and gossamer. On another night I’ll go for more mag and/or aperture on this one, but for now the view is impressive enough!

1:36
NGC 2420 (Gem): The last one in Gemini? In some ways, this seems a similar cluster to NGC 2331; it’s small, very rich, with a lot of faint stars (maybe sixty in all), pretty well detached and unmistakable as a cluster. It’s roughly diamond-shaped, with N-S and P-F axes, 7’ N-S and 5.5’ P-F; the stars at the ends of the axes form an almost-regular diamond. There’s a significant but not huge range of mags. On the P end of the P-F axis is the lucida, which is 11.5 magnitude and is at the “bottom” end of an Aries/Dodge Ram logo (like NGC 6910 in Cygnus), like a ‘v” with curly sides; SF of that star by 2’ is the star where the two loops diverge; one goes SF and S of that star and the other F and NF it. Ten stars are part of that pattern (including the lucida) and these are overlaid over top of the rest of the cluster; these stars are 11.5/12.5 magnitude, while most of the rest of the stars are 14th magnitude and fainter, down to an unresolved haze. Most of the resolved cluster stars are in the northern half/N loop of the symbol; it’s much more populous there than in the S half. There are several brighter stars around the cluster as well: N very very slightly F the lucida by 9’ is a 9th-magnitude star; S of the lucida by 7’ is a 9th-magnitude; there’s a 10th-magnitude NP lucida by 10’ and a 9.5-magnitude star NF the lucida by 8’, and that last star is SF the 9th-magnitude star by 4.75’.

We started late and ended early—three hours after getting to Eureka, we were on our ways home. But it had been a fine session anyway, and I managed to finally (FINALLY!) close out Sky Atlas 2000.0 Chart 5, the Auriga/Gemini region. The forecast for the next night looked promising, too, so we made our plans to get out again as soon as we could compare the prospects of each of our sites.

 

III.  Eagle’s Ridge turned out to have the night’s best CSC forecast, and despite my reticence to drive up the treacherous, vehicle-killing road, I was also more interested in observing with the group. So off to Eagle’s we went in the hour before sunset, despite the forecast indicating that clouds would begin rolling in around midnight.

Jerry and Dan R brought the 20″ TriDob and a list of fascinating targets, so I spent part of the evening bouncing from my scope to the 20″, so as not to miss some of the obscure and amazing sights that were beyond the reach of Bob the Dob. Frank S came by shortly after sunset, and new-guy Nathan also joined us after a while.

11/22-11/23/19
EAGLE’S RIDGE (spur road)
SUNSET: 4:40 PM
MOON: 26 days (rose at 2:17 PM; 15% illuminated)
SEEING: 6-7
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.40
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps upper 30s, felt warmer, windy at times (lots of wind noise on audio); slightly dewy/frosty; CSC right on the money with clouds rolling in around midnight
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DR, (FS, Nathan came by later)

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

6:38
NGCs 7782, 7778, 7780 (Psc): NGC 7782 is an elongated smudge, oriented N-S and spanning 1.5’ x 0.3’. Its halo is very diffuse and poorly defined; the galaxy has moderate central brightening, with a small, distinct, gradually arrived-to and  still-faint core–and in averted-vision a flicker of a stellar nucleus. There’s also a just-above threshold star 3’ S very slightly P the galaxy. P very very slightly N of the galaxy by 6’ is a 13th-magnitude star with a 14th-magnitude star NF it by 1.5’. SP the galaxy by 9’ is another galaxy (7778): this one’s elongated N-S and is half the size, about 0.67’ x 0.5’, and has more distinct concentration than 7782; it has a small brighter core and a distinct substellar nucleus. This galaxy has N slightly P it by 1.75’ a 12.5-magnitude star, while 1.67’ S slightly P is a 13.5-magnitude star.  N slightly P 7782 by 11’ is another, very faint galaxy (7780) with very little central concentration and a very very diffuse and poorly defined halo; it’s 0.75’ x 0.3’, elongated N-S. It’s much, much fainter than the others. The second galaxy (7778) is a little better defined and less diffuse than the third, which is really tricky and hard to get a fix on. NP this last galaxy by 3.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. N slightly F 7782 by 6’ is a 12.5-magnitude star that’s the SP corner of a Hercules keystone asterism composed of three other stars between 12th- and 13th-magnitude.

I somehow managed to completely miss NGC 7779, the second-brightest object in the field, which was right next to NGC 7780.

7:15
NGC 7625 (Peg): A galaxy inside the Great Square of Pegasus now–a reasonably bright small round one, not more than 0.75’ across. It has a gradually-brighter core and what looks like maybe a stellar nucleus. The halo is pretty well defined and not particularly diffuse. The galaxy may be elliptical, judging by its brightness profile. It lies in an interesting field, the brightest star in which is F slightly N of the galaxy by 7’ and is 7th magnitude. P slightly N the galaxy by 7’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. F the galaxy by 4.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star S very slightly P that star by 1.25’, and the 11th-magnitude star is F very slightly S of the galaxy by 3.75’.

7:25
NGC 7678 (Peg): is also in the Great Square. This one’s interesting because it’s set in the center of an isosceles triangle of 11th-mag stars: one to the due N, one to the due S and one to the N very slightly F. The galaxy is 1.5’ across, with a pretty diffuse, reasonably-well defined halo and a very gradually-rising central core that’s not easy to define; there’s nothing like a nucleus. The core is just barely brighter than the halo. Averted vision doesn’t help bring out any other detail at this magnification. The triangle of stars is 1.25’ along the N edge and 2.67’ on each long side; the three stars in triangle are 11th magnitude (N, N very slightly F) and 12th (S) magnitude. The galaxy is skewed slightly toward the S end of the triangle. From the star to the due N of the galaxy 1.25’ N slightly F is a 14th-magnitude star that turns the triangle into a diamond (or makes it equilateral with the two stars N of the galaxy). The brightest star in the field is F slightly S of the galaxy by 12’ and is 9.5 magnitude. P the galaxy and very very slightly N by 7’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. From the star due N of galaxy NP by 2.75’ is a 12.5-magnitude star.


The wind was howling by this point, and was a loud rumble on my recordings. It was also a burden on my scope, as the shroud made for an ideal sail, and the scope’s butter-smooth motions allowed the wind to blow it around in circles; I ended up having to hold onto the scope while observing through it… at least until the winds died down after the third hour or so.

We also somehow ended up having a conversation about elk/moose/bear encounters; Frank had spent many years in Alaska and had grown up in Wyoming (as had Jerry); Dan grew up in Montana and had also been aboard a Soviet naval vessel in the Arctic. So the “northern” stories were always a bit of nostalgia for the group of us (I’d spent several years in Alaska; Mrs. Caveman had grown up there, and so had Dan B.), and were a natural topic on freezing nights at the telescope in the wooded environments we observed in.

7:52
NGCs 7769, 7771 (Peg): Both of these galaxies are fairly prominent; NGC 7769 is roundish, 0.75’ across, with a diffuse halo, the edges of which are not super well defined. There’s an abruptly brighter core and a distinct stellar nucleus to this one.  It almost looks like there’s a threshold star embedded P the nucleus; this gives the appearance of a “double” nucleus. 5.5’ F somewhat S of 7769 is NGC 7771, which is much longer than 7769; it’s elongated P very slightly S-F very slightly N, 1.67’ x 0.3’, and better defined than NGC 7769, with a distinctive and pretty large core but no nucleus. The galaxy has a 14.5-magnitude star SP the center, off the P end just outside the halo [this star is actually NGC 7770!!]; off the F slightly N end by 2.25’ from the galaxy’s center is a 13th-magnitude star. Due S of 7771 is the NF end of a ‘Y’ pattern that’s elongated N slightly P-S slightly F; that star is the 2nd-faintest of the four in the Y and is 7’ S of 7771 and is 13th magnitude; SP that star by 3.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star (these two stars form the tines of the Y); 2.67’ P very slightly S of the first star is the middle of Y, which is 13.5-magnitude; P very very slightly N of that star by 2’ is the end of the Y stem, which is 11.5-magnitude and is SF 7769 by 8’. S slightly P 7769 by 2’ a 13.5-magnitude star. The brightest star in the field is N slightly P 7769 by 16’ and is 9.5 magnitude.

After this observation, I dashed off to look at Einstein’s Cross—a lensed quasar, splitting the light of a single galaxy into four separate images—in the 20” scope. Having done a fair amount of reading about the object, it was astounding to actually see it, even if the lensed images were too indistinct to separate them clearly and certainly (perhaps better seeing might’ve helped, or perhaps not).

Then it was back to an old favorite, one of the first “galaxy trios” I’d observed, and one that had been a regular on my list since my first observation of it back at the Sky Squires’ flying field outside of Marion, Illinois.

9:54
NGCs 470, 474, 467 (Psc): I’ve seen this trio many times, but have never taken notes on it (I think I do have a very early sketch of it drawn at the flying field outside of Marion, IL, which we used to use for observing until we got kicked out.) NGC 470 is  the largest of the three [a bright airplane went right through the field!] but certainly not the brightest of them; it might even be the dimmest overall. It’s elongated N slightly P-S slightly F, 1.75’ x 0.75’, with a pretty poorly-defined and quite diffuse halo. There’s some moderate central concentration, but this is not well distinguished from (and only slightly brighter than) the halo; it’s very gradual in getting to the core. There’s no nucleus. N of the galaxy by 1.75’ is a 14.5-magnitude star; there are two 14th-magnitude stars due S of the galaxy, one P the other; the F-most of these is 2.25’ from galaxy, with the other P that one by 0.67’ (the P star is very slightly fainter). Due F the galaxy by 5.5’ is NGC 474, which is much smaller but brighter than 470. The galaxy is 1.25’ across, with a small somewhat brighter core and a brighter substellar nucleus; the halo is pretty well defined. The galaxy has the brightness profile of an elliptical. There’s little around it in the field; NF it by 3.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. Back to 470: S very very slightly P it by 8’ is a 10th-magnitude star; due P that star by 3.25’ is a 7.5-magnitude star; 3.5’ P that star is NGC 467: this galaxy is 1.25’ across. It has a small slightly-brighter core, but an obvious substellar nucleus; its halo is much more diffuse and less defined than the other galaxies. SP 467 by 2.25’ is a 13th-magnitude star; S of that star by another 2’ is another 14th-magnitude star. From 470 N somewhat P by 9’ is a 10th-magnitude star; N very very slightly F that star by another 10’ is a 10.5-magnitude star.

The topic of between-object discussion veered into linguistics; specifically, the three allophones of /h/ that occur in Arabic, and then the “Top Ten Linguistics Terms That Sound Vaguely Pornographic” t-shirt I co-created at SIU for the Linguistics Students’ Association there. I’m not sure what prompted that particular discussion.

Having been enthused by the view of Einstein’s Cross, Jerry tracked down another lensing quasar, one more-recently discovered: Andromeda’s Parachute. There’s a relentless fascination with seeing such distant objects—this one’s nearly 11 BILLION LIGHT YEARS away—that transcends the difficult, blurry views in the eyepiece. We used stupid-high magnification; I think I only managed glimpses of two of the lensed images, but that was certainly enough to keep me stoked throughout the evening.

Dan had been talking about observing the Witch-Head Nebula in binoculars, so Jerry aimed the 20″ at the nebula. It’s much too large for even the widest of fields in a large scope, but we were able to trace the following, more-serrated edge of the nebulosity for several eyepiece fields, much like the California Nebula in Perseus (which we also looked at during the evening).

Then it was off to another object I’d been dreading taking notes on: the Rosette Nebula and its associated star cluster. The cluster was the primary Herschel object here; I had thought I needed NGC 2237, part of the Rosette itself, but this too turned out to be a flaw in my cross-checking of the various Herschel lists; the inaccurate list had it included, while Huey’s correct version didn’t, and having made my original spreadsheet from the inaccurate list, I hadn’t crossed it off when I switched to the Huey list. I’m not too irritated with this, however, as I needed to make a detailed observation of the Rosette regardless, and it was well worth the time I spent on it.

11:00
NGC 2244 (Mon): Getting into the “major” objects here, with the Rosette Nebula cluster (I’m detailing both objects separately).  This roughly-rectangular cluster is oriented N slightly P-S slightly F, about 16’ x 6’ (the width across the middle); it’s not a particularly rich cluster, with about fifty stars scattered over the area, but many are considerably bright. (There are also numerous fainter stars here, giving a wide range of magnitudes.) The cluster is moderately-well detached, primarily because of the nebulosity around it [cf.] creating the appearance of a thinner density of stars to the region. The middle of the cluster is much denser than the “ends.” In the middle of the P edge is a 7th-magnitude star; that star is surrounded by a number of fainter stars. SP that star by 1’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; due S of the 7th-magnitude star by 10” is a 12th-magnitude star; SF the 7th-magnitude star by 1.25’ is a 10.5-magnitude star that has an 11th-magnitude star just N of it by 0.67’. There are also several much fainter stars (especially to the N) surrounding the 7th-magnitude star; N slightly F the 7th-magnitude star by 1.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. F slightly N of the 7th-magnitude star by 4’ is an 8.5-magnitude star that has NP it by 0.75’ a 9th-magnitude star; these last two stars make up the middle of the F edge of the cluster. Between the 7th-magnitude star and the last two stars are seven stars in a N slightly P-S slightly F arc; this arc is 4.5’ long and forks at the S end. From the 7th-magnitude star due SF by 8’ is a 6.5-magnitude star that marks the SF corner of the cluster; P slightly S of that star by 3.25’ is a 7.5-magnitude star (the SP corner of the rectangle); N very slightly P the 7th-magnitude star by 5.5’ is another 7.5-magnitude star (the NF corner); there’s an 8th-magnitude star P that one by 4.5’ (the NP corner); from this last star 6’ S very slightly P is a 9th-magnitude star. 8’ SF the SF vertex of the cluster is a small isosceles triangle whose S-most vertex is a close double; the three main stars in that triangle are 10th/11th magnitude, with the short side 0.67’ long to the F and the point star 1.25’ to the P.

11:21
NGCs 2237, 2238, 2239, 2246 (Mon): To call the Rosette Nebula “big” would be an understatement! The cluster occupies the nebula’s central hole (of course); the hole in the nebula is largely visible as a void of 17’ x 13’, elongated N-S. The nebulosity extends well over a degree; there’s a separate part (2237) of the nebulosity that’s part of the Herschel list [or so I thought; a look at Alvin Huey’s version of the list seems to belie this notion]; the NGC 2237 section lies about 17’ NP the 7th-magnitude star in the middle of the P edge of the cluster, and runs 19’ to due P that star; that arc is the brightest part of the nebula, and its outer edge has lots of light/dark striations in it, especially along that side; there’s a filament of nebulosity that runs N of the 7th-magnitude star and sweeps along to the P; this filament is perhaps 25’ long and at one point (N of the 7th-mag star), the filament is 4-5’ thick; on the P edge of the filament, there’s a dark striation that runs almost due P-F through or across the width of the nebulosity on the P side, and the bright filament roughly ends there; the P end of the filament is the brightest part; there’s an 11’ x 6’ section at the P end of the filament that’s much thicker and brighter at that end (this is NGC 2238); the filament narrows at the middle like a long hourglass and then from due P the 7th-magnitude star, and on the S, there are a couple of empty dark areas among the nebulosity; there’s another bright patch from the filament’s end (S beyond the dark striation that cuts across the filament); and running NP-SF from the brighter (11’ x 6’) patch there’s another, thinner, filament (2’ thick) that runs across tangential to the torus of the nebula; to the P side of that filament there are more dark striations; this is all P very slightly S/SP the 7th-magnitude star, in the outline of the nebula. The nebula is variably thick, averaging about 20’ thick around the cluster and the central hole. The NF outer edge of the nebulosity (2246) seems better defined than the rest of the perimeter, as if bounded by dark nebulosity; on the NF edge, there’s a dark striation that’s very obvious in averted vision. There are not many good reference stars along that side; NF the cluster on the outside edge of the nebulosity is a tiny diamond of stars, 1.25’ x 0.75’, and the main dark patch on that NF side is 15’ S of that diamond. The dark ridges in the N end of the nebula, so obvious in photographs, are indeed visible here; they may make up some of the border of the larger filament described earlier on the N to P ends of the nebula. This may be the best I can do with my notes; like NGC 7000, it’s hard to describe because there’s so much detail visible. 23’ due P the 7th-magnitude star there’s a small dark patch, 5’ x 2’, elongated roughly N-S, and a small bright (?) patch separated by the end of the main filament on that side and very much more slightly visible than the rest on that side.


The Clear Sky Chart, as it usually is, was right on the money with clouds rolling in around midnight; a few thin waves of crud had started to spread in from the northwest. These weren’t an immediate threat to the region I was working in (although their presence generally implied some loss of transparency and seeing throughout a much larger area of the sky than what was visible; I hadn’t yet really noticed any deterioration toward the southeast).

12:09
NGCs 2245, 2247 (Mon): In looking for this one, I managed to drop my scope right on top of it. I had the UHC in from looking at the Rosette, but it’s out at the moment. The nebula is still visible without a filter, as is one N slightly F it. The nebula surrounds a star of 11th magnitude; the star is to the N slightly F edge of the nebula, and there’s still some nebulosity beyond that. The nebulosity is very wispy in texture, as befits a reflection nebula. It’s 1.25’ and roundish; it’s a little better defined on the F side but fades more away to the S and has the grainy look of a reflection nebula. F very slightly N of the nebula by 1.67’ is an 8th-magnitude star that’s the brightest in the field; N slightly F that star by 11’ is another nebulous star (NGC 2247); this one contains a brighter star than 2245; that star is 8.5 magnitude and has an 11.5-magnitude star 2’ NP of it; this second neb is smaller and fainter although the star may overpower it. It’s 1.0’ around; the star is pretty centrally located in the nebula. N of the first nebula by 16’ is another 8th-magnitude star. Both nebulas are located in a fairly rich field.


My first astronomy class at Northern Arizona University was taught by the long-tenured Dr. Richard Hall, a character about whom an entire volume could be written just from student comments. Dr. Hall’s area of focus had been Hubble’s Variable Nebula, NGC 2261 in Monoceros, an object whose changes of shape and brightness (due to variability in the illuminating star) make it a sight to be examined as often as possible; Dr. Hall had shown us a filmstrip of photographs of the nebula that he had taken over a thirty-year period, and these photos (accompanied by a Ligeti-esque soundtrack) displayed well the changes for which the nebula is famous. It’s impossible to observe this little nebula without flashing back to those days at NAU, and any time I see an article about Hubble’s Variable Nebula, I have to instinctively scan it for Dr. Hall’s name.

12:24
NGC 2261 (Mon): The unmistakable Hubble’s Variable Nebula. [I saw it in the 20” earlier.] I’m impressed by how wide the fan is at the N end compared to in the past; it’s very evenly fringed across the N end, and like a computer gradient, it fades out smoothly. The star at the S tip is 13th magnitude. The nebula extends N from the star over an almost-perfect 90-degree area; the nebula extends 1.3’ from the star and 1.67’ across the N end; it’s nicely symmetrical compared to past years. NF by 1.3’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; F very slightly S of that star by 2’ is the S of a pair of 12.5-magnitude stars separated N-S by 0.25’. S very slightly F the nebula, 9’ from the nebula’s illuminating star, is a 10th-magnitude star. From the nebula’s star, due NP by 8’, is the more S of a pair of 10.5-magnitude stars; the second is 1.25’ N very very slightly F, and is a tiny bit brighter than the S star. The UHC filter doesn’t do anything for the nebula at all, so the OIII probably wouldn’t either, although the texture of the nebula is slightly different in the UHC–it seems a little stronger on P edge, but weaker overall with the filter; the central part of the “fan” shape extends NP a bit from the star and then loops back F; there’s a little arc of nebulosity there within the interior of the nebula and fades out as it loops back.


The sky crud had finally reached the meridian, and would soon be spreading into the Orion/Monoceros region where I was observing. I needed only one more object to close out Sky Atlas 2000.0 Chart 11 anyway, although it was quite a biggie:

12:38
NGC 2264
(Mon): The famous Christmas Tree Cluster. This is a very broad, poor cluster of forty stars covering a wide range of magnitudes and spread out over a 28’ x 22’ area; it’s not really well detached from the Milky Way background. I’m picking up bits of nebulosity throughout the field, so I may need to use a filter later. The cluster is focused, on the N end, on a 5th-magnitude star (15 Mon) that’s glaringly bright; that star has 0.3’ due N of it a 14.5-magnitude star, and there are three pairs of stars beyond this; due F the 5th-magnitude star by 3’ is the more P of a P-F pair of 10th-magnitude stars separated by 0.3’; SF the 5th-magnitude star by 1.25’ is a 9th-magnitude star with a 10th-magnitude SP it by 0.67’; due SP the 5th-magnitude star by 2.75’ is a 9th-magnitude star with a 10th-magnitude star P slightly S of it by 0.67’. The second unit of the cluster begins 8’ F the 5th-magnitude star, with a star of 7.5 magnitude that is the P-most and right-angle vertex of a small right triangle; SF the 7.5-magnitude star by 1.67’ is one of magnitude 9.5, and there’s a 10th-magnitude star 1.75’ F very slightly N of the right-angle vertex; from the 5th-magnitude star SP by 8’ is the middle star of a backwards ‘y,’ which is 8.5 magnitude and has P very slightly N of it by 0.5’ a 12.5-magnitude star; the end of the y-stem is SF the primary of that pair by 1.75’ and is 9th magnitude; from the brighter of the pair in the middle of the ‘y’ NP by 3’ is an 8th-magnitude star that marks the N tine of the ‘y’; S very very slightly P that star by 3’ is a 9th-magnitude star. From the 5th-magnitude star S slightly F by 26’ is the 8th-magnitude star at the tip of the Cone Nebula (which is not visible, although there’s something… odd about that area of the field that might be a hint that something is amiss there, or could be imagined because I know what’s supposed to be there); this 8th-magnitude star has F very very slightly S it by 0.75’ an 11th-magnitude star. With the UHC filter, there’s clearly nebulosity around the 5th-magnitude star, about 2’ around the star, and it extends a little farther N; there are also some traces around the ‘y’; especially along its stem (the double star and one F very slightly S of that); these are all just wisps of haze as if through a dewed-over eyepiece; there’s a little nebulosity from the end of the ‘y’ stem thru the star pair at the middle and down to the S tine, but less so than along the N tine; there’s also a little bit as well N of the stem in averted vision.

There’s a certain spiritual satisfaction that comes from a really good observing session: fine observing, beautiful conditions in the sky and at ground level, good camaraderie and conversation, knowing that I’ve taken good notes and spent time exploring the objects I was looking at. Tonight fulfilled all of those criteria, to the point that even the clouds cutting the session short did little to dampen spirits. After observing some of the sky’s other showpieces, many of them in the 20″ scope (M82, the Eskimo Nebula, M42, NGC 1514, etc., all of them before the clouds swallowed up the stars), it was time to tear down our gear for the drive home, grateful that the trip down the mountain was somewhat easier than the same route going up.

 

IV. Our next opportunity to observe—and the window was closing fast for this Moon-dark phase—turned out to be Thanksgiving night. Dan R joined us for an early dinner, but declined to go observing that night. It turned out not to be a bad decision, as the wind and cold conspired to drive us off of Linlaw Point before I had a chance to pick up any of the winter Herschels that I needed. We spent just a little over two hours there (not counting setup), but it was a rewarding two hours.

The last quarter-mile—the drive up the side of the butte–was covered with snow. There had been intermittent patches on the first part of the gravel road, but I had some actual trouble getting the Caveman-Mobile to the top. Once there, I wound up parking in a spot that was a little farther around the bend, and in a little bit less snow than the rest covering the butte (there was at least 2″ worth unevenly spread around the top). It was still enough accumulation to stay in the back of my mind while I was observing; I didn’t want to be the last one out, in case I couldn’t get enough traction to get moving again.

In my haste to get to the site, I forgot my boots. On most nights, even cold ones, this wouldn’t be as much a problem; tonight, with the wind blasting and my wool socks also at home (sitting atop my boots!), it made things decidedly uncomfortable. Dan B insisted that I take his spare boots, and though they were a couple of sizes too small, they were far better than the running shoes I was wearing. The seeing for the night was predicted to be no better than a 1/5 on the Clear Sky Chart, but was considerably better. Given the wind, that was a pleasant surprise.

While waiting for full darkness (and anticipating a long session), I started with an object that had recently been the subject of a thread on Cloudy Nights: the tiny, distinctive open cluster Trumpler 1. Then it was on to some Herschel III objects before (hopefully) making further headway on the H400/HII lists.

11/28-11/29/19
LINSLAW POINT (43 58’ 48” N. 123 42’ 4” W)
SUNSET: 4:37 PM
MOON: 2 days (set at 6:37 PM; 4% illuminated)
SEEING: 6 (rated a ⅕ on CSC)
TRANSPARENCY: 6
SQM: 21.5
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps low 30s, cold, wind loud on audio and picked up strong after 9 PM; 2” of snow at site, frosty
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DB, RB

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

8:19
Trumpler 1 (Cas): I’m still waiting for stuff to rise, so I’m heading up to the circumpolar sky for this interesting and very small cluster, which was the subject of a recent CloudyNights thread; it’s over by M103. The cluster forms the right-angle vertex of a large right triangle, and consists of six primary stars overlaid upon a circular background haze, like M4 with its famous N-S line of stars; four are quite prominent, forming a 1.25’ line, which is oriented S somewhat P-N somewhat F; the second star from the N in that line is the brightest in the cluster and is 10.5 magnitude; all of the stars in that line are spaced identically, which makes for an unusual uniformity; the third star from N is a double, 11th- and 12th-magnitude stars with the brighter P the fainter by 5”; 10” P very slightly S of the star at the S end of that line is a 14.5-magnitude star; 0.3’ due F the star at the N of that line is a 15th-magnitude star that’s just barely visible; from N to S the stars are 13th, 10.5, the double, and the star on the S end is 11.5 magnitude. From the lucida SF by 1.3’ is the middle star of another line (of three stars) which is oriented P somewhat S-F somewhat N; that star is 12th magnitude, and there’s a 14.5-magnitude star SP that one by 0.67’; 0.67’ NP the middle star is a 14th-magnitude star; these three stars look to be outside the boundary of the cluster, as they’re not involved with interior background glow. F the lucida by 8’ is a 9th-magnitude star; there’s another of 9th magnitude due N of the lucida by 13’, and that star is in the middle of a 4’ long NP-SF line of five or six evenly-spaced stars (one is N very very slightly F the 9th-magnitude star). The two 9th-magnitude stars form the right triangle with the cluster.

8:36
NGC 520 (Psc): This is the Honeysuckle Galaxy, a distorted merging system, and one that I’ve observed before. It’s impressively large: 2.25’ long and more diffuse to the SF end, where it’s 0.67’ wide, and narrower to the NP end (where it’s 0.3’ wide). The galaxy has an obviously irregularly-bright interior; there seems to be a fairly-small diffuse patch at the NP end inside the halo, and a larger one to the center and SF. 3.5’ NP from the center of the galaxy is a 14th-magnitude star. The galaxy (or galaxies) has no nucleus, just irregular brightening along its major axis; it’s not really oval-looking, and certainly not a classic edge-on spiral by any means. SP the galaxy by 4.5’ is the more-S of a pair of 14th-magnitude stars; this one is slightly brighter than its companion to the N; those are N-S to each other and separated by 1.5’. Further SP, 12’ from the galaxy, is a 10.5-magnitude star. NF the galaxy by 21’ is a 10th-magnitude star that has a 12th-magnitude star SP it by 2.75’. F the galaxy by 16’ is the P-most vertex of a small right triangle; that star is 11th magnitude; there’s another of 11th magnitude 1.67’ F the first, while the right-angle vertex is 0.75’ N slightly F the first 11th-magnitude star and is 12.5 magnitude.


I set my telescope up with the eyepiece to the right side; this keeps the Telrad finder above the focuser, rather than slightly below. Unfortunately, it also meant that, when looking anywhere but between the northeast and northwest, I was facing into the razor-sharp wind. I tied up the hood on my sweatshirt to keep less of my face exposed—what a night to not bring a ski mask.

8:50
NGC 95
(Psc): I’m sticking in Pisces for a while, as none of the Herschels I really need will be up for a while. This is a moderately-bright galaxy but less so than NGC 520. This one’s elongated slightly P-F, 1.0’ x 0.75’. It has a somewhat-brighter core that’s neither well distinct nor well defined; the core is somewhat messily [?] and gradually arrived at. The core seems offset to the NP and is irregularly bright. In averted vision, there’s certainly a stellar nucleus but it’s sometimes pretty easily visible in direct vision. N slightly F the galaxy by 2’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s a 12.5-magnitude star N very very slightly P the galaxy by 5.5’; P somewhat N by 6’ is a 12th-magnitude star. SF the galaxy by 11’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. The brightest star in the field is due N of the galaxy by 18’ and is 10th magnitude.

I’ve observed in some tough conditions, but these were bad and getting worse. The wind was absolutely howling, giving no respite to the observers up on the exposed point. Discretion being the better part of valor, Dan B and Ruby headed out before things became truly unpleasant. During my next observation, Jerry stopped over to let me know that he was also about a half-hour from calling it quits for the night. I had to follow, not being keen to see if I could get the van out of the snow with no-one else around.

10:02
NGCs 678, 680, 691, 697, 695 (Ari): I first discovered the 1 Arietis Group in a Ken Hewitt-White article from Sky & Telescope a number of years ago, and I look at it frequently when there’s a pause in my Herschel hunting. 1 Ari is an exceptional double, but tough to hold; the brighter component is NP the fainter by 3”, and these are 6th and 8th-magnitudes; the secondary is tough to pick out from the primary’s glare. 7’ S of  1 Ari is an 8.5-magnitude star; P very slightly S of that star by 12’ is an 11th-magnitude star, and 7’ due S of that star is NGC 678, which is S very slightly P 1 Ari by 20’. This galaxy is a long glow with a brighter center; it has a small, brighter 0.3’ core inside a 2.25’ x 0.3’ streak that’s elongated P-F; on occasion there seems to be the flash of a non-stellar nucleus. The halo is very diffuse and difficult, and not well defined at all; averted vision is necessary for a decent view. F very slightly S of 678 by 6’ is NGC 680: this is a brighter, smaller, rounder galaxy; it’s very slightly elongated N-S, 1.0’x 0.75’, with a considerably-brighter, well-defined, and abrupt core and a quite bright nucleus that’s not quite stellar; its halo is diffuse and poorly defined. The galaxy is bracketed by stars on its NsF, S and F: 4’ to the N slightly F is a 12th-magnitude star; F by 3.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; and those two stars and the galaxy make an almost-equilateral triangle; 3.25’ S of 680 is an 11th-magnitude star with one of 13th magnitude 0.75’ P it. From NGC 680 SF by 10’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; another 8’ in that direction is a double of equal-mag components: both magnitude 10.5, with one P very slightly S of the other by 10”; 1.75’ SP the more-P of that pair is another galaxy (NGC 691) that’s quite diffuse; it’s very weakly centrally concentrated and weakly defined, without much of a core, but has flashes of a very very faint stellar nucleus. It’s elongated roughly P-F, 1.25’ x 1.0’. This galaxy is 30’ SvvsF 1 Arietis. F slightly N 1 Ari by 17’ is another galaxy (NGC 697), which is much larger and brighter than any other in the group; it’s elongated P-F, 2.25’ x 0.75’, and pretty well defined; it’s clearly an edge-on judging by its profile, and doesn’t have much core but does have a very very faint stellar nucleus that requires averted vision. The galaxy is the P vertex of an isosceles triangle with a pair of 12th-magnitude stars to the F: one is due F the galaxy by 6’ and the other F somewhat N by 6’, and these two stars are separated by 4.5’. Between the galaxy and those two stars are a number of other stars in the 13th-magnitude and fainter range. N of this galaxy by 11’ is a close pair that I suspect aren’t a real double, with the brighter P the fainter by 0.5’; these are 11th- and 13th-magnitudes; NP the brighter of the pair by 3.75’ is another small galaxy (NGC 695), which is 0.5’ round; it’s fairly well defined but even in brightness, without much central brightening. The galaxy has a 13th-magnitude star due P it by 0.67’; that galaxy is N slightly F 1 Arietis by 23’.


Of the galaxies around 1 Ari, I missed IC 167 and NGC 694–I’m chalking this up to my impatience in the face of the freezing wind.

As we were tearing down for the night, Jerry and I watched a strange caravan make its way along the backroads around the butte. Six or seven vehicles—Range-Rover types, although it was hard to tell in the dark—crept slowly along the road past and below where we were. Every now and then, they would stop and the drivers would get out, shining brilliant flashlights into the trees. Whatever they were searching for, they seemed not to find it; I never saw a report of a missing person in that area, but I have no idea what it could have been. The caravan gradually pulled past the butte and kept going; as we made our way down from the point, there was no sign of them anywhere. I half-expected to catch up with them on the way back to Eugene, but the roads were mostly traffic-free on this Thanksgiving night, and even the road construction that had been going on along the highway since we’d started going to Linslaw was absent for the holiday.

 

V.  The next and last night of the November run—and the last clear night until at least February, judging from the current weather forecasts—was even colder, but had no wind to speak of. It did have dew, though… lots of it. The humidity made Eureka Ridge seem even colder, as did the fact that we were frequently standing in patches of snow; as the lowest in elevation of our regular sites, Eureka suffered less from the snowfall than did Linslaw or Eagle’s Ridge, but more from the dew.

Five of us braved the conditions—and given the crappy skies since that night, were glad to have done so. I quickly discovered that my powertank wasn’t working, despite having allegedly been fully charged; the heat from my eye kept fogging the eyepiece, indicating that the battery powering the eyepiece dew heater was dead. So I had to borrow a spare battery from Jerry in order to get any observing done, and would later have to borrow his hair dryer as well, as the dew proved too much for my secondary-mirror heater  (which runs on a 9-volt battery, rather than via 12-volt). Clouds also became an issue, although they were at least predicted to do so. In general, it was a night we might have otherwise chosen to stay home, but we knew how poor the prospects always are for Willamette winters. There were no clear winter nights to waste.

As usual, I started with Herschel III objects until the appropriate area of the sky was better placed. But I also took the opportunity to pick off one of the five Herschel 400/HII galaxies in Camelopardalis while clouds bedeviled other parts of the sky.

11/29-11/30/19
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 4:36 PM
MOON: 3 days (set at 7:33 PM; 9%  illuminated)
SEEING: 6
TRANSPARENCY: 6-3
SQM: 21.3
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: cloud bands after 9:30, heavy dew, fog, frost; temps to 21 F; much mid-level moisture in air; no wind; patchy snow on ground; v. cold
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, LR, RA, Nathan 

7:48
NGC 877
(Ari): A decent-sized, moderately faint galaxy, one elongated NP-SF, 1.5’ x 0.67’. It has a 13.5-magnitude star just off its SF end, just outside the halo, and there’s a 15th-magnitude star 2’ off the NP end. The galaxy is difficult to draw detail from because it’s 5’ N very very slightly P a 7.5-magnitude star; the star off the SF end also interferes with the observation. The galaxy is pretty diffuse but pretty well defined; it almost looks like a Magellanic-type, boxy like NGC 4449 but much smaller [it’s actually a spiral with an extended core]. It’s somewhat irregular in brightness, especially on the NP end; it has some central brightening that’s also irregular and poorly defined, but nothing like a definable core, and doesn’t appear to have a visible nucleus. SP the galaxy by 3.5’ is another 14th-magnitude star. The 7.5-magnitude star is also the F-most vertex of an isosceles triangle; the other star on the triangle’s base is 8.5 magnitude and is P the 7.5 by 11’; from the 7.5-magnitude star S very very slightly P by 15’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; I thought for a moment there was another galaxy in the field but can’t find it again right now. The faint star SP the galaxy almost looks double at times, maybe even in averted, with a threshold-faint companion NF the primary by 0.25’.

Embarrassingly, I completely missed three companion galaxies—NGCs 876, 870, and 871—in the field. I’ll have to return to this one in order to catch the others.

8:12
NGC 16 (Peg): This is a little, N-S elongated galaxy in an interesting field; it’s quite small but fairly bright, subtending 1.0’ x 0.3’. The halo is pretty well defined, and it has both a small bright core that is suddenly arrived to and a stellar nucleus. There are a number of 11th-mag and fainter stars within 7’: the most noteworthy is due S of the galaxy by 5’ and is magnitude 11.5; there’s a 12.5-magnitude star SF the galaxy by 5.5’. Due P the galaxy by 3.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star with a 13.5-magnitude star 0.67’ F it and an 11.5-magnitude star 4.5’ P very slightly N of it. N very very slightly F the galaxy by 4’ is a 13th-magnitude star. The brightest in the field is NF the galaxy by 13’; it’s magnitude 10.5 and is the S-most of a lowercase ‘y’ pattern that consists of three other 10th/11th-magnitude stars: N very very slightly F the first star by 4.25’ is a 10th-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star N very slightly P that star by 4.75’ and another 11th-magnitude star due NP by 5’. There’s another 10.5-magnitude star alone NP the galaxy by 14’. P slightly S of the galaxy by 15’ is a 10.5-magnitude star with a 13th-magnitude star S of it by 0.67’.


8:29
NGC 7741 (Peg): One of the more-difficult of the HIIIs I’ve done so far (which is saying something), this galaxy is exceedingly diffuse, with a poorly defined round halo, about 1.5’ across. Any concentration at all visible here is very, very weak. It almost looks like there’s a central bar extending P-F; in averted vision this bar becomes much more strong of an impression, just a weak bar that runs the width of the galaxy. There’s no trace of a nucleus, but the view is also hampered by having a double or pair just outside the N slightly P edge: the fainter is SF the brighter by 0.3’; these are 9.5 and 12.5-magnitudes. (I ”walked over” the galaxy without seeing it because of the double star.) A 10.5-magnitude star lies SP the galaxy by 7’, and a 12th-magnitude star F very slightly S by 3’. The brightest star in the field is due N of galaxy by 13’ and is magnitude 9.5.

By this point some of Gemini was starting to be visible; Orion was already all the way up.  I’d be able to get working on the “good” stuff soon.

8:58
NGCs 7753, 7752 (Peg): This galaxy is considerably tough, out there in the middle of nowhere, just above Great Square on upper edge. It’s a very diffuse galaxy, 1.0’ around, with an exceedingly diffuse and poorly defined halo. There’s a very very slight bit of central concentration, but it’s almost nothing; the core is extremely gradually arrived at and just slightly brighter than the halo. No nucleus is visible.  [There’s also a super-slow satellite moving N-S through the field…about 9th-mag…taking more than a minute to cross the field; didn’t quite notice it at first.] Every now and then, I’m getting a flash of an embedded threshold star on the SP edge of the halo, barely there. 7’ due S from the center of the galaxy is a 10th-magnitude star that has a 13.5-mag star 0.75’ S very very slightly P it; the 10th-magnitude star has S very slightly P it by 5’ an 11th-magnitude star and S very very slightly P that star by 4.5’ is another of 11th magnitude. P the galaxy and very slightly N by 3.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star. There’s a 13.5-magnitude star SP the galaxy by 6’, and between that star and the galaxy (about 1.75’ SP the galaxy), every now and then in averted vision appears a speck of another galaxy (NGC 7752). This one is no more than 0.25’ around and just on the edge of visibility; I can’t even hold it steadily in averted.

I could hear the sound of Jerry’s hair dryer working in the background, and realized that my own secondary was probably dewed over. I was already in the middle of an observation, though, and wanted to get to a pausing point before asking for the dryer.

9:19
NGCs 521, 533 (Cet): these are faint, roundish little galaxies, neither of them anything to write home about (although I suspect my secondary mirror has fogged over badly). Both galaxies are visible in direct vision quite well; NGC 533 is the more obvious and more possessing of detail. NGC 521 is a round, very diffuse and poorly defined and ghostly glow, 1.0’ in diameter. It’s framed on the P and N sides by a number of 14th-magnitude stars. The galaxy has no obvious central concentration, no core or nucleus visible, just a very even surface brightness; in moments of better visibility, though, a small, very slightly brighter core can be seen. The galaxy has N very very slightly P it by 3.75’ a 14th-magnitude star that has P very slightly S of it by 0.67’ a 14.5-magnitude star. SP the galaxy by 2.75’ is another 14th-magnitude star; there’s another of 14th magnitude NF the galaxy by 5.5’. 20’ S very slightly F of the galaxy is a 7.5-magnitude star, and then F 521 by 15’ is NGC 533: this galaxy is 1.25’ across. It has a distinctly brighter (but not bright) core that’s fairly small, and flashes of a very faint stellar nucleus. The halo is not well defined. SP by 7’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; P slightly N by 3.5’ is a 14th-magnitude star. There’s a right triangle N/NF the galaxy: N of the galaxy by 7.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; from that star NF by 7’ is a 12th-magnitude star, and there’s a 12.5-magnitude star SF that star by 5.5’; the 12th-magnitude star is the right-angle vertex of that right triangle. NGC 533 is much the more easily-apparent of the pair; 521 is considerably more wraithlike…. My secondary mirror was indeed heavily fogged; now that it’s unfogged, there’s obviously much more contrast and presence to the galaxies. 533 has a much more obvious core and a stellar nucleus; there’s a very very faint stellar nucleus to 521. [My magnitude estimates could be way off throughout the observation due to the dew issues.]

Right on cue, the sky was starting to show patchy clouds throughout. Jerry and Robert both started to pack up; Jerry let me keep the powertank and hair dryer until I had a chance to drop it off to him.

10:17
NGC 1961
(Cam): We’re fighting some clouds now, mostly in the south and west; I’m skipping up to Camelopardalis for actual Herschel hunting, as none of the others I need are high enough yet, and I don’t want to waste the evening’s potential should the clouds make further observing impossible. This is a fine galaxy, even with the sky degrading quickly. It’s very diffuse, not particularly well defined, but quite large (1.75’ x 1.0’) and elongated P-F. It has an irregularly-bright halo with a large, very gradual, and very unconcentrated core that’s only slightly brighter than the halo; on the SF edge of the halo is an embedded 14th-magnitude star. I can’t tell if there’s a nucleus visible; there doesn’t seem to be. 2.5’ P the galaxy is a 12th-magnitude star. F somewhat S of the galaxy by 2.75’ is a 14.5-magnitude star with a 13th-magnitude star F slightly S of it by 1’. [The clouds are starting to sweep into the galaxy’s vicinity.] 8’ SP the galaxy is a 10th-magnitude star; there’s a 10.5-magnitude star S very very slightly P that star by 3’. P the galaxy by 20’ is the brightest in the field, which is magnitude 8.5 and a bit reddish…. I’ve unfogged the secondary again; the star on the SF edge of the galaxy is very distinct now, and there’s also a threshold star on the NP of the galaxy that’s in a line of similarly-threshold stars, with the closest 1.75’ NP the galaxy and then a 14th-magnitude star 2’ S very slightly P. Now that the secondary’s clear, the galaxy’s halo (2.0’ x 1.3’ P-F now) seems much more mottled/irregularly bright.

The sky had cleared a bit toward the east, so I turned back to Gemini to finish the few remaining objects there.

10:44
NGC 2304 (Gem): A really interesting, pretty uniformly-faint cluster. This is obviously a cluster, as it’s considerably fainter than most of the MW stars here and pretty well detached. It’s very rich with a very narrow range, most of the stars being 14th-magnitude and fainter–just a dusting of faint glittery stars. There must be 70 stars minimum, with the brightest no more than 13th magnitude, and only about 25 actually visible/resolved. The cluster is elongated SP-NF, 5’ x 2’, and wider at the F end, almost fan shaped. Individual stars are hard to pick out as far as any distinguishing internal structure. From the approximate center due P by 7’ is a 10.5-magnitude star with a 10th-magnitude star 2.75’ P somewhat S; from the 10th-magnitude NP by 1.25’ is another of 10.5 magnitude. NP the cluster by 5.5’ from the approximate center is an 11th-magnitude star with a 10.5-magnitude star N very very slightly P it by 2.5’; that second star is the right-angle vertex in a right triangle whose third vertex is 12th magnitude and P by 2.67’. The brightest star in the field is 21’ SF the cluster and is 7th magnitude. S slightly P the cluster by 20’ is an 8th-magnitude star. The cluster is still a bit in the Eugene skyglow and would definitely benefit from better conditions.

11:13
NGC 2356 [2355] (Gem): Quite an impressive cluster that may be fading in the eyepiece because of clouds rolling through. This one is roughly triangular, with its base to the S and its point to the N. It’s pretty well detached and quite rich, with 45 stars. If the star on the SF edge is a member, the cluster has a wide range; that star is 10th magnitude.  There’s a N-S line of seven stars on the P edge of the cluster, most of which are in the 12.5/13th-magnitude range, and those are among the brighter certain members of the cluster; these lie atop a fair amount of unresolved background haze; the area along that line and an area within 0.67’ of the lucida are the richest areas in the cluster. Along the P edge and including the N-S line, the cluster is 4’ long; on the F edge it’s 3’; of the triangle itself, the S edge from the bright star to the S end of the N-S line is another 3.75’, but the P edge extends S-ward a bit from there, 5.3’ on the P side. The majority of the cluster’s brighter members are along the P edge, with most of the unresolved glow in the middle of that edge and stretching SF from there. In the middle of the N-S line, about 1’ S from its N end, is a double star of 13th and 14.5 magnitudes, with the fainter F the brighter by 10”; there’s a 13.5-magnitude star S of the brighter of that pair by another 12”. From the star at the N end of the N-S line, (which is also the N vertex of the cluster), N slightly F by 6’ is the brightest in the field, which is 8th magnitude and is also the P-most vertex of a small (1.25’ x 0.5’) diamond; the other three stars in the diamond are 12.5/13th magnitudes, with a 13th-magnitude star on the F end and one of 8th magnitude on the P end of the diamond. As with NGC 2304, this cluster should be seen under better conditions.


11:27
NGC 2395 (Gem): A really big, sprawling thing, this cluster is elongated 17’ NP-SF x 11’ SP-NF. The cluster is reasonably well detached; the Milky Way around it is not particularly rich, but this is pretty obviously a cluster anyway; there are about fifty stars in the cluster. Its N edge runs from the NP end, where there’s a trio of 12th/13th-magnitude stars evenly spaced in a 1’ arc that begins at the N and runs S, then S slightly F, to the end of the arc; from the star at the N end of the arc, the cluster runs 9’ F slightly S and then sweeps S to S very slightly F for another 12’. In the eyepiece, the cluster is almost bird-shaped, with the general arc of the wings described above and its head running SP to NF. The NF end of the trapezoid that outlines the bird’s head is marked by a 10th-magnitude star that’s also the cluster lucida; it lies SF the star at the N end of the NP arc of three by 6.5’. The rest of the bird’s head lies SP the lucida; P somewhat S from that star by 3.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; SF that star by 1.5’ is one of 13th magnitude; there’s a 12th-magnitude star NF the 13th-magnitude star by 1.25; N slightly F the second 13th-magnitude star by 2’ is the lucida. From the lucida and stretching P slightly S for 1.5’ is a line of equally-spaced 13th/14th-magnitude stars; from the lucida 0.5’ SP is a 14th-magnitude star; from that star 0.5’ P very very slightly S is a 13th-magnitude star; from that
star 0.5’ P very slightly S is a 13.5-magnitude star. The S end of the N-SF arc that makes up F edge of the cluster (the F wing of the bird) contains more of the brighter stars than the rest of the cluster. Overall there’s a wide range of magnitudes, from the lucida down to some 14th-magnitude stars; the convergence of the cluster’s axes is where the greater concentration of the fainter stars lies; there are also a number at the S end of the F edge, along with two 10th-magnitude stars.

Fighting the time and the cold, I did not look for the Medusa Nebula, half a degree SF 2395. Normally, I would’ve given it a go (having seen it several times already). Instead, I dropped down to Monoceros for a cluster I’d observed at Dexter, but had not gotten usable notes from.

11:45
NGC 2232 (Mon): I took notes on this one back at Dexter in March but the notes were pretty incomprehensible, so I’m redoing them here. This a pretty controversial object due to questions of identity; Seligman says one thing, Gottlieb and the DSS say another, and there are a number of diverging opinions in between. So what actually is NGC 2232, in terms of membership? From visual appearance alone, I see the cluster as three separate subunits. The main group centers around (and streams S from) 10 Monocerotis, which is 5th magnitude and within the N end of this unit; there’s an 11th-magnitude star due N of it by 3’, and that star marks the actual N end of this unit. F very slightly N of 10 Mon by 2.25’ is a 9th-magnitude star; there’s another 9th-magnitude star S very very slightly F 10 Mon by 2’; P very slightly S of 10 Mon by 1’ is a 9.5-magnitude star with a 9th-magnitude star 0.3’ S very slightly F it, and this group forms the N end of the cluster’s main unit. S slightly P 10 Mon by 4.5’ is an 8th-magnitude star that’s the N vertex of an isosceles triangle; the S-most vertex is 7’ S of the first and is of magnitude 7.5, and there’s an 8th-magnitude star as the F vertex, which is 6’ NF the previous vertex; this triangle marks the middle of the main unit. 6’ S slightly F the second (7.5 magnitude) vertex of the triangle is a 9th-magnitude star; 9’ S slightly F the third vertex (the second 8th-magnitude star) is a 9th-magnitude star that has a 10.5-magnitude star S very slightly F it by 0.75’. From 10 Mon S very very slightly P by 25’ is an 8th-magnitude star that’s the S-most tip of the main unit of the cluster. NP 10 Mon by 17’ is a 9th-magnitude star that’s the tip of the F tine of a large ‘Y’ pattern that forms the second unit of the cluster; 6’ P very slightly N of that star is a 6th-magnitude star that forms the P tine of the Y; the Y is oriented N-S with tines to S; the middle star of the Y is of 7th magnitude and is N of the F tine by 10’; 6.5’ N of the middle star is the end of the stem (9 Mon), which is 7th magnitude. The cluster’s third unit is of fairly indeterminate shape but is N-N slightly F 10 Mon; the brightest in this group is 14’ N slightly F 10 Mon and is 8th magnitude; P very slightly S of this star by 4.5’ is one of 10.5 magnitude; 4.5’ N very slightly P that star is a 9.5-magnitude star; from the 9.5-magnitude star N very slightly F by 4’ is a double: 11.5 and 10.5-magnitude components, with the fainter one SP the brighter by 9”; 0.75’ NF the brighter of the double is a 9th-magnitude star; the brightest in this group (the 8th-magnitude star) is S slightly F that last star by 8’. These are the three main units; the cluster spans from the N end of the Y down to the S end of the main unit, 50’ long N-S and 35’ P-F in minor axis. This is quite a poor cluster, with perhaps thirty stars spread out over its area; it’s not very well detached, contributing to the arguments about its actual identity. It has a large magnitude range, though, with stars from 5th magnitude down to 11.5 or lower.

Ironically, the Japanese word for “astronomy” is tenmon. (10 Mon, get it? Ugh….)

Everything had a layer of frost on it; Nathan’s astrophotography setup was practically iced up. I’d had about enough of the cold, but… the sky was still compelling, and I knew it would be a while before I could observe again. I gave it one more object, expecting that I’d get done with it and then have the energy for another.

12:22
NGC 2324 (Mon): Maybe the last one for the night; this is a really fine cluster—a misty patch with a number of brighter stars overlaid. It’s roughly diamond shaped; the N vertex of the cluster is its brightest member at 10th magnitude; S slightly P it by 4.5’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; from the 10.5-magnitude star S by 7’ is what looks like a pair of 13th-magnitude stars S very slightly P-N very slightly F to each other by 10”; from the pair N slightly F by 5.5’ is a small knot of 12.5/14th-magnitude stars no more than 0.67’ across; this contains about six faint stars and serves as the F vertex on the minor axis; N of that knot by 5.5’ is the lucida at the N (actually the N slightly F, as the cluster is elongated S slightly P-N slightly F) end of the cluster. Overall, the cluster is 11’ x 5’. Across the middle of the two axes is a denser concentration of faint stars (13th magnitude and fainter) and unresolved starglow. The N and P vertices are the two brightest stars in the cluster; the N vertex also is the NF end of a small pentagon, like a house shape: SP it by 1.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s an 11.5-magnitude star 0.5’ P that star; 1’ N very slightly P that star is one of 12th magnitude; from that star F very slightly N by 0.67’ is another of 12th magnitude; F very slightly S the second 12th-magnitude star by 1’ is the N vertex of diamond. The brightest star in the field is of 8th magnitude, and lies 10’ F slightly N of the N vertex. From the N vertex due N by 24’ is a 6.5-magnitude star with a 7.5-magnitude star NP it by 1.5’. This is a very interesting cluster despite its faintness; it’s reasonably well detached, very rich (50 stars), and a moderately-large range of magnitudes.

My eyepiece wasn’t fogged at the moment, but it had gotten dirty, and had somehow also gotten wet. That was it, then—my equipment decided for me that the night was over. And with it, 2019’s observing was over as well. I could’ve switched eyepieces, but I had pledged that the 14mm was the only one I’d use for the Herschel lists, and I was cold enough that just staying to observe things to prolong the session wasn’t really a good idea.

Nathan was still shooting images—he was working on the Heart and Soul Nebulae, ICs 1805 and 1848, and wanted more data. I didn’t want to leave anyone alone at the site, but he was fine with it, and might have had a couple of friends stop down while he was there. It took me a long time to pack up, and I regretted doing it with stars still above us. As I drove off, I must’ve had an inkling that it would be a long time before I could observe again, because by the time the Caveman-Mobile reached pavement, I seriously felt like turning around and going back to set up again. But I kept going, leaving the stars above me wheeling unobserved.

 

 

VI.  Neil Peart died on January 7th. I know this is an astronomy blog, but it’s almost impossible to separate my beginnings in astronomy from Rush’s music; I “discovered” both seriously at about the same time—in about 1980, when Cosmos was on the TV and Rush’s Permanent Waves was on the radio. That was when I had borrowed a 60mm refractor from my friend Erick (also a Rush fan) and turned it on Saturn, seeing the planet’s rings for the first time, and when my friend and neighbor Sean and I used to play Rush on his portable stereo while trying to figure out the constellations from our light-polluted backyards. (Sean would pick up an electric guitar and learn to play some of those same Rush songs; for whatever reason, I never did.)

I had started off in astronomy much younger, of course, but it was during those summers  around the time I was 12 or 13 that it all came together. And for every astronomical discovery I made, there was a Rush song that went with it; not just “Cygnus X-1,” but “Xanadu,” “The Fountain of Lamneth,” “Lakeside Park,” “Natural Science”… the themes Peart approached in his lyrics are so intertwined with my astronomical youth that they’re essentially a symbiosis. And I’m not the only one; a Focal Point column in Sky & Telescope magazine once described another reader’s experience with the conflation of stargazing and “Cygnus X-1.” These were the formative days of my youth: summer hours listening to Caress of Steel on the back porch of Sean’s house, waiting for the sky to turn as dark a grey as it could get, listening to the crickets and frogs raise their songs to the falling night; stars and planets brightening to visibility to the sounds of “Jacob’s Ladder” or “La Villa Strangiato” or “2112.” Even my early writings in both fiction and poetry bore the hallmarks of Neil’s style and influence, along with those of Carl Sagan.

They say that the music of one’s adolescence is the music that imprints upon the mind the most; my music was accompanied by the lightshow of the heavens, and never shall the twain be separated. (Anyone reading my blog here for any length of time will have noticed the inordinate number of Rush tunes included at the ends of posts; this is the reason for that.) Those days, before I managed to acquire my first telescope, have an almost mystic, mythic power that grows even stronger the farther they recede in the distance.

And as with Carl Sagan, Neil Peart is gone, to return to starstuff–both of them poets who valued the analytical and the need to know, two irreplaceable voices who melded the scientific with their concern for the devoutly human. I would be a very different person without their influence.

The more we think we know about
the greater the unknown
We suspend our disbelief
and we are not alone

 

 

The Wild Lands

September and October found us with limited observing opportunities; while these would be the best time of year to observe in the Midwest, they often begin the dreary grey winters in the Pacific Northwest. This year, they lived down to that billing.

I. Our only session in September found me with some new-to-me equipment—Bob Morefield’s son, a terrific astrophotographer, had passed along Bob’s O-III filter and a unique eyepiece: a 52mm Paul Rini “home-brew” eyepiece that has the most spectacular eye relief of any eyepiece I’ve ever seen; you can hold your eye inches away from the objective lens and still take in the entire field of view. I had admired this eyepiece in Carbondale when Bob had used it, and Kevin graciously offered it to me as he was caring for Bob’s effects.

So when the sky conditions finally cooperated in the back half of September, we traipsed up to Eagle’s Ridge for a relaxed evening of casual observing, during which the Rini eyepiece got to show its stuff and I got to try out Bob’s O-III, which proved to be more user-friendly than my older one. I had also picked up an old Edmund Scientific Erfle eyepiece (32mm) from an assortment of gear donated to EAS, but the eyepiece required much more out-travel than the 12.5″ Dob was capable of giving it; in order to use it, I’ll have to get a 2″ extension tube.

Jerry and Kathy and Loren and Donna were already up on the mountain when I got there, but Loren and Donna didn’t stay long; after getting the club’s 14.7″ Dob set up, Loren promptly tore it back down, as Donna was feeling ill and needed to go home. So Jerry, Kathy, Robert A (who arrived a bit later), and I spent the evening touring the late summer/autumn sky. I alternated between the Rini and the 10mm Delos. Targets included M33 (a particularly-stunning view), the M31 trio, NGC 7331/the Deer Lick galaxies (a.k.a. the Fleas), the 1 Arietis galaxy group, the NGC 70 galaxy group in Andromeda, NGC 891 and its dust lane (clear as can be), five galaxies in the Abell 347 cluster (next door to 891), NGC 7606 in Aquarius, the Pegasus I Cluster, NGC 7479, and the NGC 383 Group in Pisces.

But that was just the galaxies—I also browsed through M13 (and NGC 6207), M11, M15, M71, IC 4665 in Ophiuchus, and the Double Cluster, which was stunning in the 52mm Rini, And (as would be custom during the fall) the planet Neptune, which spun through its orbit in the vicinity of the naked-eye star Lambda Aquarii. (I didn’t catch Uranus on this particular night, but usually followed Neptune with it.) And I spent a fair amount of time studying the Veil Nebula, comparing the two O-III filters.

09/21-09/22/19
EAGLE’S RIDGE (junction)
SUNSET: 7:12 PM
MOON: 22 days (rose at 11:41 PM; 49% illuminated)
SEEING: 6
TRANSPARENCY: 6
SQM: 21.22
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: not great, fairly heavy dew; temps in low 50s; eventual clouds/haze rolling in to end session
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, KO, LR and Donna, RA

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

I took no notes during the session, going mainly after objects I’d taken notes on before, and generally avoiding “serious” observing for the night.  When we left, it was in high spirits, having taken in a number of awesome sights that I would normally have used as breaks between more-subtle (read: fainter/more-difficult) targets.

II. Our next opportunity for observing came on the other side of New Moon.

I went down to Linslaw Point on September 30th, with a decent-but-acceptable forecast on the CSC. I was the only one willing to make the trip, as everyone else had plans already, or were wiped out from their plans from the night before. With observing to do, and semi-clear skies in the forecast, there was no time to waste.

I shouldn’t have bothered. Two thick bands of clouds were parked over the site and spreading. I waited in the van for them to clear off, knowing that they wouldn’t, and dropped a note on the EAS e-mail list to let anyone traveling out not to bother. It was fortunate that I didn’t set up Bob the Dob, because after a half-hour of waiting, it started to rain… a rain that was not only NOT in the forecast, but was so localized that Mark messaged to say that it was pretty clear in Florence (thirty minutes away). And the rain turned into a downpour that didn’t let up until I was down the mountain and several miles east of the site.

We returned the next night; the CSC forecast improved immensely over the twelve hours after the previous night’s debacle, and a number of the regulars were feeling positive about heading out to observe. Also joining us was Garry S, a relative newcomer to the group with a pretty impressive set of scopes (a 12″ Meade SCT and a 90mm Lunt solar scope among them). Garry had been out at the Dexter Star Party with his SCT and had come to a number of the Solar SUN-Day events Jerry and Dan B held at Alton Baker Park in Eugene, but this was the first time he’d joined us at one of our observing spots. Dan B had his 16″ Dob and his experimental 6″ SCT binocular; Loren had Orion, EAS’ 14.7″ Dob; Mark had his 11″ SCT and imaging rig, while Jerry brought his 12.5″ binoscope.

It turned out to be a pretty lively group, with a lot of jokes flying throughout the evening. And though the conditions were fairly mediocre for Linslaw, they were still fine enough for some fairly serious observing. Having already started working on the informal and not-formally-recognized Herschel III list sporadically in the preceding months, I decided to go full bore into the list, the “third” set of 400 Herschel objects (all of them galaxies) as codified by Tom Lorenzin (the author of the 1000+ observing guide). I also spent some time observing and finding the Messier globulars in Ophiuchus, Scorpius, and Sagittarius with Loren, and comparing views of M31 with several eyepieces in Dan’s 16″ Dob.

10/01-10/02/19
LINSLAW POINT (43 58’ 48” N. 123 42’ 4” W)
SUNSET: 6:54 PM
MOON: 4 days (set at 9:03 PM; 16% illuminated)
SEEING: 7+
TRANSPARENCY: 6-7
SQM: 21.33
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps upper 40s, cold, windy; wind rumble on audio
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, LR, DB, MW, GS (Garry)

All observations: 12.5″ f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

9:02
NGCs 6926, 6929 (Aql): NGC 6926 is pretty dim–it’s very noticeable but not at all bright. Most certainly an edge-on spiral; it’s thin, elongated N-S, and spanning 1.0’ x 0.3’. The central region along the length is just a little brighter the halo, but it isn’t  separable into core/arms; at moments, though, there may be a visible core. No nucleus is visible. The halo is pretty well defined; it seems like I’m seeing the whole galaxy. Every ten seconds, there may be a flash of a tiny barely-perceptible nucleus. Due S of the galaxy by 6.5’ is a 9th-magnitude star; that star serves as the S-most vertex of a small triangle which also includes an 11.5-magnitude star N slightly P the 9th-mag magnitude by 1.75’ and a 12.5-magnitude star N slightly F the 9th-magnitude star by 2.5’. N slightly P the galaxy by 3.5’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; P the galaxy by 2’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. P very very slightly S of the galaxy by 9’ is a 9th-magnitude star that has another 9th-magnitude star P slightly N of it by 4.5’. F slightly N of the galaxy by 3.5’ or so is a pattern of faint 13.5/14th/14.5-magnitude stars; there are seven or eight in that range there. F very very slightly S of the galaxy by 3.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star; due N of that star by 1’ is a very very faint, mostly averted vision spot (NGC 6929) that’s no more than 0.25’ in diameter. It’s exceedingly difficult to hold steady, although it does seem to have a stellar nucleus that’s very very faint. There may be a threshold star F this second galaxy by 0.25’. [According to the POSS, there is.]

9:18
NGC 7252
(Aqr): This is the Atoms For Peace galaxy, which is somewhat underwhelming but decently bright; it’s probably much more impressive from more-southern latitudes. It’s a colliding/coalescing pair presenting as a single round, elliptical-looking 0.75’ diameter object. It has a quite diffuse halo and a gradually-brighter core with an obvious substellar (almost stellar) nucleus. There’s no trace of any of the halo detail that gave it its name, although I probably should’ve waited to observe it when it’s on the meridian, as there’s not a lot visible. N very slightly P by 3.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. S of the galaxy by 6.25’ is the N edge of a S-ward pointing isosceles triangle; the S-most vertex is 13th magnitude and has NP it by 3.25’ another 13th-magnitude star; from the S-most vertex N by 3.25’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; these last two stars are separated by 2.75’. The brightest in the field is a 9.5-magnitude star P very slightly N of the galaxy by 15’; the second-brightest in the field is NF the galaxy by 14’ and is 10.5 magnitude. 38’ F the galaxy (well outside the field) is a 5.5-magnitude star (49 Aqr).

The wind, which was at a low rumble throughout the evening, began to pick up; by this point, it had reached “dull roar” levels on my audio notes from the evening.

10:07
NGC 1184 (Cep): A beauty! This one is an honest-to-God Herschel (II) object, an edge-on galaxy that’s very thin; perhaps a flat galaxy? It’s elongated N very very slightly P-S very very slightly F and no less than 2.0’ x 0.3’ in extent. The halo is very well defined, and the galaxy almost seems like a very distant 4565. Even the ends of the halo are pretty distinct. There’s a very small but apparent central bulge that at this mag seems to be [MW came by to look] offset toward the P edge; the F edge seems a little sharper defined–is there a dust lane visible?. Every now and then a very faint stellar nucleus is seen, but it’s not easy to hold. The galaxy is pretty well surrounded within a 5’ radius by numerous stars to the P and F and a few to the N. Due P by 5.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star that has a 14.5-magnitude star 0.67’ P very slightly S; south of the 11th-magnitude star by 1’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; these form a little right triangle with the 14.5-magnitude star as the right-angle vertex. 2.5’ S very very slightly F the nucleus of the galaxy is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s a 14.5-magnitude star 2’ F very very slightly S of the nucleus. An 11.5-magnitude star lies F the galaxy by 5’; this star is the P-most vertex of a triangle, and it has a 12.5-magnitude star SF it by 1.25’ and F very very slightly S of it by 1.5’ a 13th-magnitude star. SF the galaxy by 5.25’ is the brighter of a pair, which is 11th magnitude and has a 13.5-magnitude star due P by 0.25’. The brightest in the field is F slightly S of the galaxy by 11’ and is 8.5 magnitude.


Mark stopped by my scope while I was observing NGC 1184, and I offered him a look; his computer had locked up while he was imaging, and was trying to reboot. While he was taking a look at the galaxy, I gave Loren an approximate location for M55, with the two guide stars I use—the two on the back edge of the Teapot’s handle—perfectly horizontal and parallel to the horizon. After a few looks at M55, it was then off to my next dim target.

11:17
NGCs 7302, 7300, 7298 (Aqr): NGC 7302 is a smallish, pretty dim but pretty obvious glow. Its halo is quite diffuse and 0.75’ round; it has a very small brighter core and/or a faint substellar nucleus. There seems to be a threshold star just on the P edge of the core [POSS shows nothing there]. The halo is reasonably well defined. Due S of the galaxy by 2.75’ is a 9th-magnitude star. N very very slightly P the galaxy by 11’ is a 10th-magnitude star; due N of the galaxy by 7.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star. N very slightly F by 3’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; there’s a 13th-magnitude star almost due F the galaxy by 4.5’. While sweeping for 7302, I landed first on another galaxy (NGC 7300); this one is P slightly N of 7302 by 22’. It’s elongated close to N-S, maybe N slightly P-S slightly F, and 1.0’ x 0.3’. The halo is pretty diffuse and moderately bright; I noticed the galaxy quickly. It has a very slightly brighter interior running its length but no defined “core” and no nucleus, and appears a little thicker at the S end than at the N. It also has SP and SF it, each by 6’, 12.5-magnitude stars; these form an equilateral triangle with the galaxy at the N vertex; the star to the SF also has a 14.5-magnitude star 0.75’ due S of it and a 14.5-magnitude 1.75’ NF it. The galaxy also has P slightly N of it and F slightly N of it an 11.5-magnitude star (P slightly N) by 5’ and an 11th-magnitude star (F slightly N by 6’). Almost due S of the star SP the galaxy by 6’ is a rounder, much more diffuse and difficult galaxy (NGC 7298) with almost no central brightening. This is 0.67’ diameter and really difficult to hold even in averted; it takes moments of greater transparency and seeing. This galaxy has F very slightly S of it by 2.5’ a very difficult 14.5-magnitude star [the seeing and transparency are extremely variable down this low in altitude]. The 12.5-magnitude star SP NGC 7300 and due N of 7298 is equidistant between the two galaxies.

12:02
NGC 7137
(Peg): This is a pretty obvious, round (1.0’), pretty bright galaxy. It’s quite diffuse and has a large area of slightly-brighter central brightening (or just a thin faint halo) and a faint and difficult stellar nucleus. With longer viewing, there’s a definite threshold star on P edge that flickers into view on occasion. Due F by 4’ is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s an 11.5-magnitude star 4’ F very very slightly S of that star. 7.5’ P slightly N of the galaxy is a 10th-magnitude star that has a 12.5-magnitude star 2.25’ N very slightly F it. 16’ SP the galaxy is a 7.5-magnitude star; there’s another 18’ N slightly F the galaxy. F slightly N of the galaxy is a pair of very small asterisms: a little ‘y’ with the brightest star (9.5 magnitude) in the middle, 20’ from the galaxy; while N of the little ‘y’–which has its tines to the N very slightly P and N very slightly F and stem to S and is 1.5’ long–is a small triangle whose two F-most stars are the brighter at 10.5 and 11.5 magnitudes (the brighter is 3’ N of the star in the middle of the ‘y’) and whose third vertex is magnitude 13.5.

12:43
NGCs 7385, 7386, 7383, 7387, 7389 (Peg): Another field full of little galaxies, of which the brightest and most-central is NGC 7385. It’s a roundish, fairly obvious and fairly well defined glow 0.75’ across; the galaxy has a brighter central region/core, but I’m not sure it fines to a nucleus. Just outside the NP edge of the halo lies an 11.5-magnitude star that’s making it hard to hold details in the galaxy; 2.5’ P slightly S that star on the NP edge by 2.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star. Almost due N of the galaxy by 5.75’ is another brightish galaxy (NGC 7386): this one is also fairly roundish, 0.67’, with a smaller,  brighter core than 7385 has (and is much brighter than its own halo), and a substellar nucleus that flashes out at moments. 3.75’ N of 7385/2’ S of 7386 is a 14th-magnitude star; SP 7385 by 5.5’ is another galaxy (NGC 7383) that’s only 0.3’ round and really difficult to get a fix on; it has a very small faint (but somewhat brighter than the halo) core. Back to 7385: due F by 9’ is the more P of a pair of stars, which is 11th magnitude and has a 10.5-magnitude star F very very slightly S of it by 0.67’. Two more galaxies lie between 7385 and the pair of stars: one (NGC 7387) is halfway between NGC 7386 and the star-pair; it’s incredibly diffuse and barely there, and it looks to have a 15th-magnitude star just outside its S edge [this looks like it’s actually a 16.75-magnitude galaxy, PGC 69835–hard to believe that would be visible, but POSS shows nothing else there]; this galaxy is very slightly elongated SP-NF(?) but can’t be more than 0.3’ x 0.25’. It has no real brightening, although the faint star makes it difficult to tell. Between 7385 and the P of the pair and S of that line (so 6’ F slightly S of 7385) is the remaining galaxy (NGC 7389), which is really really tough, elongated NP-SF (I think), no more than 0.3’ x 0.25’. It seems to have at moments a very faint stellar nucleus visible, and a tiny, slightly more-concentrated core. With the 10mm Delos, the fainter galaxies are quite a bit easier. 7387 and 7389 are bigger, both 0.5’ x 0.3’; the more N of the two has much more distinct central brightening and the star [galaxy?] S of it is much more apparent. NGC 7383 has definite NP-SF elongation and a somewhat brighter core. In averted vision, 7385 has, especially on the S edge, some mottling/irregular brightness along that edge. NGC 7386 may have an embedded threshold star to the SF of the nucleus but it’s still hard to tell [this isn’t borne out by the POSS plates].


1:10
NGC 210; PGC 2454 (Cet): This galaxy is quite bright, and elongated 1.5’ x just over 0.5’ N-S. It has a brighter core that’s quite obvious and a very obvious substellar nucleus that’s also quite bright. The halo is pretty well defined. This is a rather nice, easy galaxy that lies at the end of an arc of three stars, just off F end of the arc; the stars in this arc get progressively dimmer as they trail F; the P end of the arc is marked by an 8.5-magnitude star that’s due P the galaxy by 8’; 3.75’ P very very slightly S of the galaxy is a 10.5-magnitude star; due P the galaxy by 1.25’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; these make up the arc. Due S of the galaxy by 6’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; from that star 6’ S very slightly P is a 9.5-magnitude star. NP the galaxy by 6.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star that’s the S-end of an arc of four that stretches N and then NP, is 8’ long, and has at its N very slightly P end its brightest star (magnitude 11). From the galaxy NF by 20’ is a 10th-magnitude star that’s the F-most vertex in a triangle that has three stars on its P side; halfway between the galaxy and the bright star is a 14th-magnitude star that has P it by 1’ a smaller galaxy (PGC 2454) which is NF 210 by 8’; this galaxy is very slightly elongated N-S but is much much more difficult than 210, almost an averted-only object. It’s no more than 0.5’, maybe 0.5’ x 0.3’, with a very very slightly brighter core but no other visible detail.

We agreed to head out after too much longer; Garry had already left, having a longer drive home than the rest of us. Satisfied with my observations throughout the night, I spent the remaining time with some of the usual suspects (M15; M1 [The Crab Nebula]) and some of the other targets in Cetus (NGCs 1055, 246, and 255, the latter of which was an HIII object but one on which I didn’t bother taking notes).

The real glory of the night, though, was M42. I’d seen it hundreds of times over the years, but the view in Jerry’s binoscope was incredible. Even though the scope was pointed just above the horizon, the nebula was stunning. I had to sit on the ground in front of the binoscope in order to see, but the view was infinitely worth it. The nebula had a clarity and presence I’d never seen before, bolstered by the double-eyed view; the vaporous texture of the nebula, and the dusty black clouds surrounding its hydrogen bubble, were detailed beyond anything I’d ever seen, and the jewel-like Trapezium (with E and F stars plain as could be) glittered amongst the clouds. I took ten minutes (at least) to trace out the nebula’s full extent and to stare in wonder at this king of deep-sky objects, one that I had seen so many times and yet felt I was experiencing for the first time.

We broke down gear and left Linslaw, M42 burned into our consciousness. It would’ve lingered on after we got home had it not been for the drive home.

I was about four miles from the site when I had to swerve to avoid… something in the middle of the road. Something huge and dark and unmoving that came up to the level of the driver’s side window.

It was a dead bear.

I was two miles down the road before I realized what it was. I thought for a few moments about calling the police to let them know about a large dead bear in the middle of the road. I also thought about calling or texting Jerry, who had come down just after me. But I waited until I got home before asking if anyone else had seen it—I still wasn’t 100% sure that it was what I thought it was. But Jerry had also taken note of it, even if the others hadn’t seen it.

I couldn’t even make an Ursa Major joke, and the bear was removed long before we could get out again.

III. My last session for October was a short one, and my last for almost a month.

We had a divided group this night—Robert A was there with his 8″ binocular scope, and Jeff L had his Dobsonian set up even before I got there.  Jerry and Frank had opted instead to head to Eagle’s Ridge, where conditions were a bit better. (And to avoid driving into the sunset, as well.)

I felt fine before I left, and OK all through setup. We even talked to Jerry across the valley, where he noted that he and Frank had somewhat better skies than we did. But as the evening ground on, I began to feel like Mrs. Caveman’s respiratory infection (picked up on a trip to China) was starting to hit, and by 9:30 I felt bad enough to tear down and go home—we had a major Halloween party for which I’d spent a fair amount of money on costuming, and I didn’t dare miss it. (And I did miss it—not from the respiratory infection, but from a case of food poisoning that kept me bedridden for a week.)

But for the moment, I was still working on the H-III list, as codified by Alvin Huey’s Guide to the Herschel III Objects.

10/24/19
LINSLAW POINT (43 58’ 48” N. 123 42’ 4” W)
SUNSET: 6:14 PM
MOON: 27 days (rose at 4:20 AM; 6%  illuminated)
SEEING: 4
TRANSPARENCY: 6
SQM: 21.42
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps upper 40s, cold, windy; lots of wind rumble on audio
OTHERS PRESENT: RA, JL

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

8:16
NGC 7743
(Peg): This is not a bad galaxy at all! It’s a diffuse, not-quite-round glow, with some slight P-F elongation; it spans 1.0’ x 0.75’. It has a small, somewhat brighter core and a distinct, obvious stellar nucleus set in a pretty well-defined halo. [There’s LOTS of wind on the audio!] [A satellite runs S-N through the P edge of the field.] The galaxy sits in an active field: S very very slightly F the galaxy by 0.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; S very slightly P the galaxy by 2.75’ is an 11th-magnitude star. There’s an 11.5-magnitude star due SP the galaxy by 7.5’, and this is the F-most vertex of a scalene triangle; it has a 12th-magnitude star S very very slightly P it by 2’, and that star has an 11th-magnitude star P slightly S of it by 3.5’. From the galaxy N by 2.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. Due NF the galaxy by 4’ is a 12th-magnitude star. 7’ N slightly F the galaxy is a 9.5-magnitude star that’s the SP vertex of a small parallelogram, whose major axis is 7’ and minor axis is 4.25’; from the first of the vertices due F by 3’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; from the first vertex due N by 4’ is a 10th-magnitude star that has a 13th-magnitude star N very very slightly P it by 0.75’; from the first vertex N slightly P by 5’ is an 11th-magnitude star, and these four stars make up the parallelogram. From the galaxy 21’ NF is the brightest in the field, which is 6.5 magnitude; S slightly P that star by 5’ is an 8th-magnitude star.

So I ended October’s observing with tissues shoved up my nose, my throat starting to burn, and starlight still visible above me when I got home.

 

Summer’s Wave Goodbye

I.  The last few observing sessions of the summer—during the waning weeks of August—found us making further use of Linslaw Point as a primary observing site. It was to be a fairly short run, punctuated by nights of clouds and rain amid the clear. (More appropriately, it was a run of cloudy nights punctuated by the occasional starlit sky.)

Although we spent most of our observing time at Linslaw, the first night of the run took place at Eureka Ridge… or would have taken place there, had not some of the local flavor decided to turn the evening into an episode of Jackass.  And had we not been there, the night could have legitimately turned tragic.

We weren’t alone when we arrived at Eureka to observe; two or three of the local 2nd Amendment Heroes (TM) were there as well, in the bowl of the ridge, exercising their trigger fingers but not their brains. We’d become accustomed to shooters using our sites (or the areas nearby) for target practice, and it was usually no problem (as a gun owner myself, I appreciated the fact that the open spaces could be used for careful and environmentally-safe target practice). However, these Einsteins were being neither careful nor mindful of their surroundings. In fact, they were likely drunk off their collective ass, although they may have been equally stupid sober—they weren’t just shooting at inert targets, they were blowing holes in propane canisters and setting them on fire.

Jerry, Loren, Amy, and I watched with a mixture of disgust and horrified amusement, despite having our scopes set up to observe overhead; training scopes on the eejits at work below indicated that they’d set fire to an entire pile of wood and numerous scattered bits as well. Every now and then, a gush of flame and a metallic ping indicated that they were still active at “blowin’ shit up.”

We watched until the fires died down, as if they’d had their fun and were putting the fire out. But then they just… drove off, leaving the fires still burning, if somewhat smaller than they had been.

I wish that, in the time I’d been observing them, I had taken down their license number. But I hadn’t even considered the idea that these intellectual titans might actually leave their conflagrations burning—during the usually active FIRE SEASON—so it never occurred to me to get the appropriate information. So as the fire began to spread, we had no way to tell the authorities who was behind it.

But we did have cell service, and so as Jerry and Loren drove down to the fire to see what they could do about containing it, we were able to stay in touch. Jerry called fire dispatch as he and Loren pushed all of the burning materials into a pile, and then Loren drove up to the road junction (of Simonson and the BLM road up to the site) to help lead the fire department to the site. Amy and I could do nothing but watch and wait in case Jerry needed more help keeping the fire contained. (It helped, of course, that Jerry had been a forest-fire-fighter at one point.)

And we waited… and waited… and waited. After several calls to dispatch, Jerry finally got a call that fire service was on their way. (Apparently, they had to get a crew back to “the office” before they could even be dispatched, and this took quite a long time.). It took almost two hours for the fire service to arrive and twenty minutes for them to put it out.

After all the excitement, there wasn’t really much impetus to stay for observing, and the smoke smell was pretty potent and offensive anyway.  We packed up and left, the firefighters still cleaning up the mess as we drove out.


II.
  Returning to Eureka the next night was pretty much out of the question, although we were all curious to see what the mess looked like in the daylight. Instead, the forecast seemed best at Linslaw, so Linslaw it was. Jerry was keen to actually get some observing done, rather than firefighting, and Robert A also found the free time to make the trek out.

It turned into an outstanding session, with excellent seeing and transparency, and the 21.5 SQM average we got seemed far too low—the Milky Way was gorgeous, bright, and full of light and dark detail. Unfortunately, it didn’t last; in the hour before Moonrise, clouds began rolling in, taking over the entire sky by the time we arrived home. But the magic few hours were well worth it.

I began with a compact galaxy group that I’d seen before in the 18″ scope; that any of it was visible in the 12.5″ was jaw-dropping, let alone how much I actually saw.

08/24/19
LINSLAW POINT 
SUNSET: 8:02 PM
MOON: 25 days (rose at 1:00 AM; 23% illuminated)
SEEING: 7
TRANSPARENCY: 7+; MW outstanding, Dark Horse/Pipe pretty easy but shape hard to discern
SQM: 21.5, seems better
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps low 50s; lots of wind rumble on audio; no dew–deteriorated as night ended; a few clouds crept in and covered much of the sky by the time I got home
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, RA

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:23
Shakhbazian 166 (PGCs 59122, 59120, 59174, 2785443, 59157) (UMi): Unbelievable! A surprisingly (relatively) easy sighting of an extremely obscure target. In the Delos: galaxies extend N and NF an 11th-magnitude star that has a 13th-magnitude star N slightly F it by 2.5’; from that second star, NP it by 1.5’ and 3.5’ due N of the 11th-magnitude star is a very small fuzzy spot (PGC 59122) that might be 0.25’ across and seems to have another smaller one (PGC 59120) 0.5’ due N of it; these are very hard to separate at this magnification and at first glance look like one slightly extended object; every now and then, there’s just enough darkness between them to tell that they’re separate objects. F those two stars and very slightly N of the S one is a pair of 13.5/12.5-magnitude stars oriented SP-NF to each other, with the dimmer the more P by 0.5’; that dimmer star is 4.25’ F very very slightly S of the brighter of the first two stars (the 11th-magnitude star). From the dimmer of the first pair (the 12.5 magnitude) N very very slightly P by 8’ is another 12.5-magnitude star that’s the leaping-off point for the next group of galaxies: NF that star by 0.75’ is a third galaxy (PGC 59174), which is as round and indistinct as the others; it’s maybe 0.25-0.3’ across; S very slightly P that same star by 0.67’ is another, almost-imperceptible little glow (PGC 2785443) which is only visible about 50% of the time in averted vision; NF that 12.5-magnitude star by another 5.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; there’s another very difficult glow (PGC 59157) about 40% of the way between the two stars, from the brighter one NF to the dimmer (i.e. from the 12.5-magnitude star to the 13.5). This is a field of a whole bunch of tiny, barely-visible galaxies; I feel like more should be visible, but these are the only certain ones.

The next target on which I took notes was a galaxy in Lyra, although not in the Vega Chain; this one is a fairly-well known interacting system, but not much to look at in a medium aperture.

11:59
NGC 6745
(Lyr): The Bird’s Head Galaxy is certainly more a target for higher magnifications; it’s an interacting system of two or more galaxies, but a bigger scope is probably needed for spotting any real detail. It’s pretty small, 0.75’ x 0.3’, and elongated roughly N-S; it looks bent, but at this magnification it’s hard to tell definitively in which direction; in moments of better seeing/transparency it definitely looks curved. The galaxy lies within the long side of a flat isosceles triangle of stars which points to the F very slightly S: the point star of the triangle is F very very slightly S of the galaxy by 4.75’ and is 9th-magnitude; there’s another 9th-magnitude star S very very slightly P the galaxy by 9’, and N very very slightly F the galaxy by 8.5’ is a 10.5-magnitude star that’s in the middle of a small, close-knit group of much fainter stars. The brightest star in the field is P slightly S of the galaxy by 17’ and is 6.5 magnitude. Due N of the galaxy by 1’ is a small quartet of 12.5/13th/14th-magnitude stars. Skipping the Delos and going straight to the 6mm Radian: this is an observationally-fascinating galaxy! It’s definitely narrower at the N end and seems a bit brighter at that end; I can’t tell if there’s separation of the components–at the N end there’s a brighter spot (a nucleus? A very small galaxy? A star-forming region triggered by the interaction of the galaxies?). It’s a surprisingly-bright galaxy; I expected to struggle with it. It almost looks like Hubble’s Variable Nebula in a way, with the bright spot at the N end and much more diffuseness along the S end, which curves P and gradually fades into the background.

My other observations this particular evening included objects I’d observed elsewhere in the larger scope (Barbon’s Galaxy [UGCA 441] in Pegasus; I missed the two nearby Arp galaxies); the huge faint planetary nebula Jones 1 (near Barbon’s Galaxy); Uranus & Neptune, looking sharp; M13 as good as ever (I used the Delos here as well–stunning!); and M11, M15, and M22 (also with the Delos). I had outstanding views of M31 and NGC 206; NGC 891 easily showed its thin dark dust lane; NGC 7479 with its bright bar and one easy spiral arm; carbon star TX Piscium  was naked-eye bright and very orange, even to my colorblind eye. I tracked down NGC 6822, Barnard’s Galaxy, in my scope and also saw it in Robert’s binoscope.  The Veil Nebula was incredible, looking like a filtered view even with no filter, and also  swung over to the Ring Nebula and NGC 7094 (the brighter planetary in Pegasus).

A short observing session, but a well-rewarding one.

III.  There were two nights remaining in the usable range of the weather forecast; both looked spectacular on the Clear Sky Chart, particularly at Linslaw. It was a no-brainer, then, that we’d make use of both.

The first of these had the bigger crowd, with Jerry, Dan B, Jeff L, and Warren—a recently-joined member of the crew—also making their way out to the site. (This was actually Warren’s second trip out with us.) The CSC forecast called for a 9 or 10 out of ten for transparency; it didn’t achieve that, but it turned into an excellent night anyway as darkness settled in. I spent the night observing targets I’d culled from the interstellarum Deep-Sky Atlas and from Alvin Huey’s excellent series of PDF observing guides (available  here). 

08/26-08/27/19
LINSLAW POINT 
SUNSET: 7:59 PM
MOON: 27 days (rose at 2:53 AM; 7% illuminated)
SEEING: 6+, variable
TRANSPARENCY: 7 (forecast to be 9-10)
SQM: 21.6+
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps low 50s, cool, very gusty; wind rumble on audio, no dew
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DB, Warren, JL 

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

11:53
NGC 6819 (Cyg): The Fox Head Cluster is a really fine cluster that somehow escaped both the Herschel 400 and HII lists–it’s better than many actual denizens of those lists! It’s pretty to easy to see, even at first glance, why it’s earned the name, as it looks straight-up like a kitsune. This is very obviously a cluster, one well-detached from the Milky Way, and very rich, with a minimum of 60 stars in an 8’ diameter. NF and S slightly F of the cluster are a couple of considerably-bright stars. There are two prominent lines of stars in the cluster: one on the P side that runs N-S and one on the F that starts on the S and arcs back NF slightly; along the F edge is a large number of faint stars; that’s the more populous side. Between these lines at the N and S ends are two distinct small dark patches that look like real dark nebulae rather than actual “voids” among the cluster stars; in fact, to the S of the cluster, running P very slightly N-F very slightly S, appears to be a large dark lane. The cluster, with its two dark nebulae, looks almost like a letter “H”, but the star-lines curve outward into the fox-head shape. The majority of the member stars are in the 13th/14th-magnitude range, but there are also a number of 11.5/12th/12.5-magnitude stars overlaid over the top of the cluster and these make up the fox-head outline. The SF corner of the capital H is a close pair separated NP-SF by 0.25’, with the fainter to the NP; these are both approximately 11.5 magnitude (the NP star just slightly fainter). Four prominent stars are along the P side: one down at the bottom of the ‘H’ on the P side; one at the crossbar of the H (which is shifted more to the S end of cluster); one at the top of the H, and one NP that last star by 0.67’; these four are all 12th magnitude. From the top of the H on the F side, and running another 2’, is the rest of the cloud(s) of fainter stars on the F side. The two dark nebulae are each 0.5’ round; between them is a bridge of faint stars that runs P-F and contains a clump of six or seven 14th-magnitude and fainter stars that forms the crossbeam of the H, which is about 0.5’ thick. To the NP, off the NP end of the cluster, is another small (2.5’) grouping of 12th and 13th-magnitude stars that I don’t think is part of the cluster. NF the cluster by 9’ (from the middle of the H crossbar) is a 6th-magnitude star; there’s a 7th-magnitude star 11’ S slightly F that same point of the H. Just NP the starry patch to the NP edge is a large oval blotch of dark nebulosity that’s 5’ x 4.25’ and elongated P slightly S-F slightly N; on the NP end of that dark nebula is a pair of 9.5-magnitude stars separated by 1’ S very slightly P-N very slightly F.


12:14
NGCs 7541, 7537 (Psc): A really fine pairing of galaxies here in Pisces. NGC 7541 is a large edge-on or highly inclined spiral which is elongated P-F, 2.5’ x 0.67’. It’s concentrated in the center and along the length very unevenly; the central concentration makes up the majority of its size, as its halo is quite thin (although quite well defined). No nucleus is discernable. Just outside the F end of the halo, 1.75’ from the galaxy’s center, is a 12.5-magnitude star. P slightly S of the galaxy by 7.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; S of that star by 9’ is the N-most of a pair of 11.5-magnitude stars separated P slightly S-F slightly N by 0.5’. NvsP the 11th-magnitude star by 13’ is a 10th-magnitude star. Due F the galaxy by 24’ (so outside the field) is a 9.5-magnitude star. SP 7541 by 3’ is another galaxy (NGC 7537
) that’s also pretty clearly an elongated spiral; this one is much smaller and rather fainter than NGC 7541 (but not faint). this one is elongated P slightly S-F slightly N, 0.75’ x 0.25’. It has a little bit more obvious central concentration than 7541; almost but not quite to a nucleus; there’s a somewhat brighter core, but the halo is less well defined than that of 7541. The 11th-magnitude star that’s 7.5’ P slightly S of 7541 is 5.5’ P very slightly N of this second galaxy.

The major drawback to using a voice recorder or app to record my notes, rather than pen and paper, is that the wind and ambient noise can drown out my voice on the recorder. This is usually made up for by all the advantages of having hands free to steer the scope, not needing a light to write by, being able to have an eye at the eyepiece at all times while dictating, etc. etc. But on listening back to these recordings from this particular evening, the wind was the dominant sound, and at times it was difficult to even hear my own voice.

12:31
NGC 7080
(Vul): An odd choice–a spiral in Vulpecula, going along with my goal to spot a galaxy in every constellation. (Of course, there won’t be any available targets in Scutum or Sagitta, at least in any scope I can afford.)  This is actually quite a decent subject for its proximity to the Milky Way; it’s better than any of the Vega Chain members. The halo is quite diffuse, and in averted vision, it does have a small faint core and maybe a trace of a substellar nucleus. The galaxy is nearly round, 0.67’ across, although with effort it appears very slightly elongated (maybe 0.75’ x 0.67’, oriented roughly P-F). Several faint (13th/14th-magnitude) stars surround it: one of 14th magnitude to the NF by 0.75’ and two almost due F, a 14.5-magnitude star by 1’ and a 13th-magnitude star by 2.25’. [My notes are really hard to hear over the gusts of wind in the background. At this point on the recording, the wind blew my scope around in azimuth as I was adjusting my chair.] The galaxy has a poorly-defined halo with no definable core, but a substellar nucleus; the stars on the NF and F really make it difficult to focus on the nucleus. Due P the galaxy by 4.75’ is the brighter and more-N of a pair, which is 11.5 magnitude and has a 13.5-magnitude star S very very slightly P it by 0.67’. F somewhat S of the galaxy by 7.5’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; there’s another 9.5-magnitude NF the galaxy by 15’, and the brightest in the field is SP the galaxy by 20’ and is 7.5-magnitude.

And now, another legit Herschel 400 object I’d somehow forgotten when sweeping through Andromeda last fall:

12:45
NGC 752 (And): This huge cluster is one of only two autumn Herschels I haven’t gotten; I somehow forgot to observe it when I was in Andromeda before. It’s a gigantic cluster that overflows the 14mm eyepiece’s 42’ field, probably a degree in diameter. It may be extended more P-F than N-S. The most obvious feature in the cluster is a small triangle of stars about 33% of the way from the S to the N edge of the cluster; this triangle consists of a 7th-magnitude star which is its N-most vertex and has SP it by 1.25’ a 9.5-magnitude star, while SF it by 1’ is another 9.5-magnitude star. The cluster itself consists mostly of stars in the 10th/11th-magnitude range, with a number of 9th magnitude as well. In the center of the cluster (N of the triangle) is the largest concentration of stars, arrayed in no particular pattern; there are lots of little chains here but no discernable shape. The triangle itself is the N central part of a large ellipse of stars whose F edge is better defined than its P edge; this ellipse is 12’ x 10’ and is irregular, being wider at the N end than the S, with very few stars within the ellipse. P slightly S of the triangle, 12’ from the 7th-magnitude star, is a much smaller triangle of the same orientation, but consisting of two 12th-magnitude stars and one of 13th magnitude; this is an isosceles triangle with the star on its F end the brightest; the P and F sides are 0.5’ and the long side, to the S, is 0.67’ (there’s a 13.5-magnitude star 0.67’ F the N-most vertex that turns the triangle into a diamond). Overall, this is a really big, coarse cluster of no less than 100 stars; it’s not very rich given its area, although it’s reasonably detached from the background. There’s not a huge range of magnitudes present, with a noticeable lack of fainter stars. The central region is well denser than fringes, which could be mistaken for a random slight increase of star density in the field. From the brightest star in the little triangle SP by 30’ is a pair of 6th-magnitude stars P slightly N-F slightly S of each other by 3.25’; these are outside the cluster boundary.


Not wanting to be too wiped out for the next night, we decided to call it a night soon after. In addition to the objects I took notes on, there were many I didn’t (for various reasons). Among these were Uranus and Neptune, which we always observe when they’re up (the ice-giant planets are my favorites for some reason; probably because they’re obscure compared to big bright Jupiter and Saturn). I was the only one of the group tonight not to catch Neptune’s moon Triton in Dan’s 16″ scope; I seem to do better at seeing faint galaxies than many of the others, but this ability to see dim, extended objects seems not to do equally well with faint point sources. I also poked through a few sets of dim Aquarius galaxies, which I skipped taking notes on because they were obviously not as well seen as they should’ve been, being very low in the muck. I hit a number of the bright globulars of summer and fall (among them M55, M75, M15, and a last glance at M13) before returning to galaxies: M33, M74, the Abell group A2197 (containing the brighter galaxy NGC 6146), the Hickson 5 compact galaxy group in Pisces, and my two favorite small galaxy groups: the 1 Arietis Group and the NGC 383 group, also in Pisces.

And then it was back to Earth for the 45-minute drive home.

IV.  The last night of our August run had the best conditions of all—and some of the best I’d ever seen. Once again, the Clear Sky Chart predicted a 10/10 in transparency, and once again, it didn’t quite reach that level (although it was still excellent); the seeing, however, steadied down as the night progressed, becoming the steadiest of all of our sessions in Oregon.

Robert A brought out his 3D-printed Binoscope 2.0, and Frank was joined by some of his family at the site. Those of us who drove to Linslaw were greeted with an epic night. I ended up taking notes only after I was the only one there, spending more time bouncing between scopes and comparing the views of different objects. It was the best of all possible observing worlds.

The Milky Way was awash with stars, light patches and dark nebulosity, the Pipe Nebula standing out boldly even with Jupiter almost inside it. Every eyepiece field in the Milky Way was studded with dark veins and streaks, especially the area around M11, which displayed more detail than I’d ever seen it—a dense, glittering pile of stardust set amid a spider’s web of black threads. I spent at least an hour scanning the Milky Way with my 11 x 80 binoculars, sweeping through Sagittarius, Scutum, Aquila, and places farther north; everywhere, there were inkblots among the stars. (Aquila was a particularly rich hunting ground—not just Barnard’s E, but countless less-familiar others that until that night were just dashed lines on a star chart.)

Binoculars put aside, I spent time scanning for some of the Sharpless nebulae in the Cygnus/Sagitta/Vulpecula region. For whatever reason, I failed to find them; I know that some of these are mischarted on the TriAtlas, and perhaps SkySafari continued this error. Or perhaps I wasn’t as attached to finding them as I should’ve been.

And as the Milky Way set and the population at the site dwindled to one, I finally got down to the more-clinical aspects of note taking and hunting down the wonders of galactic and extragalactic space.

08/27-08/28/19
LINSLAW POINT 
SUNSET: 7:57 PM
MOON: 28 days (rose at 4:03 AM; 2% illuminated)
SEEING: 7+, possibly reaching a 9
TRANSPARENCY: 7-8 (predicted 5/5)
SQM: 21.61 (9:30), up to 21.69
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps low 50s, no real wind; no dew
OTHERS PRESENT: RA, FS

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

12:07
NGCs 7444, 7443, 7450 (Aqr): NGCs 7444 and 7443 are a pair of brightish elongated galaxies, N-S to each other. The galaxy to the S (7444) is elongated N-S; the second galaxy (7443) lies to the N by 1.5’ and is elongated SP-NF. Both span 0.75’ x 0.3’ and have well-defined haloes. 7444 is a little more diffuse and less concentrated, with a suddenly brighter core but not a visible nucleus; 7443 has a brighter core and a definite stellar nucleus. SF 7444 by 2’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; that star has SF it by 2’ a 14th-magnitude star. S very very slightly P 7444 by 4’ is another 14th-magnitude star. From 7443 P slightly N by 9’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; S slightly P 7444 by 17’ is a 6th-magnitude star that has a 10th-magnitude star N slightly F it by 1.75’. From 7444 16’ SF is yet another galaxy (NGC 7450): this one seems to be elongated SP-NF and is much ghostlier/more diffuse than the others. It’s 0.75’  across, with a very diffuse, poorly-defined halo and a small brighter core that’s gradually arrived to; every now and then there’s just a trace of a stellar nucleus. N slightly F 7450 by 9’ is a 9th-magnitude star; 9’ S slightly F the galaxy is an 11th-magnitude star. Examining the field with the Delos: still no real nucleus in 7444, but a well-defined one in 7443, and still a hint of a nucleus in 7450, but there are no other galaxies in the field.

12:50
NGCs 7242, 7240; ICs 1441, 5191, 5192; PGC 68436 (Lac): There’s a lot going on here, but I have to get 4th-magnitude 1 Lacertae out of the field to get a good view of it all. NGC 7242 anchors the field; it’s a very very diffuse and poorly-defined 1.0’ x 0.75’ glow, elongated SP-NF, with a slightly-brighter smallish core but no real nucleus to speak of. On the S and P slightly S of the halo are two 14th-magnitude stars. P the galaxy by 3.5’ is the more N of what looks like a pair of galaxies, very close together; the S-most of the two (NGC 7240) looks “segmented” or double [on the POSS plate, there’s a threshold star on the SF edge]. This galaxy is 3.5’ P 7242, while the third galaxy here (IC 1441) is 1.25’ N slightly P this second one; 7240 is much better defined than its companion to the N slightly P, with some central brightening that helps to pick it out, but is no more than 0.3’ x 0.25’. IC 1441 is ghostlier and very slightly larger than NGC 7240 but much more fleeting; it’s 0.3’ across. From NGC 7240 NP by 3’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that has a 12.5-magnitude star 2.25’ NF it; there’s another galaxy (IC 5191) P very slightly S of the brighter of those two stars by 1.75’. Details are hard to glean from this galaxy [it’s actually a nice edge-on]; it’s no more than 0.25’ around, with a very slightly brighter core. From NGC 7242 3.5’ S very very slightly F is another galaxy (PGC 68436) that’s much tougher and roundish, but it’s almost impossible to pull out any other details. This area is just a mess of galaxies where they’re unlikely to be often observed! With the Delos, 7242 and the two P it are very evident; from the S-most of those two (7240) P by 3.25’ is another very very faint galaxy (IC 5192
), little more than a smudge; this one looks like it has a threshold star on the P edge.

I had added my next target to my observing list primarily out of curiosity, and found myself intrigued enough by it to spend some time on it during this phenomenal night.

1:21
NGC 7826
(Cet): An odd, left-field choice: an open cluster in Cetus. It’s obviously very well detached, given the relative paucity of background stars in Cetus versus the Milky Way (where most open clusters are located). It’s pretty star-poor, consisting mainly of four prominent pairs of stars, each separated by between 1’ and 1.5’. Those stars are arrayed roughly N-S, 9’ x 3.5’. The S-most group consists of a P-F pair, separated by 1’, with the P star 11th magnitude and the F star 12th; this has a 13th-magnitude star S very slightly P it by 1.75’. N of each of those stars by 3’ is the second pair: these are separated by 1.25’, and both 10th magnitude; the F of the pair is just a slight bit brighter; F slightly S of the F-most of this second (more N) pair by 2.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star; also N very slightly F the F of this pair by 2.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star; from more P of this second pair, N very slightly P by 1’, is a 13th-magnitude star. N very very slightly P of the P of the more N pair by 6.5’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; S very slightly P that star by 1.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; 3.75’ N very slightly P the 9.5-magnitude star by is a 12th-magnitude star; from the 9.5-magnitude star F very very slightly N by 1’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. Another, tighter pair lies 12’ F very slightly S of the 9.5-magnitude star, with the brighter N very slightly F the fainter by 0.3’, and these are 10.5 and 11th magnitude. These pairs and groups make up the majority of the cluster.

But these were hardly my only finds of the night. I spent some time searching for the planetary nebula Abell 72 in Delphinus, passing over it because I didn’t realize it was much bigger than I thought; I saw traces of the nebula, but hadn’t done enough preparation to know what it was I was seeing. While looking at the great barred spiral galaxy NGC 7479 in Pegasus, I hopped over to the very very difficult globular cluster Palomar 13, catching a fleeting glimpse of it without being able to confirm the observation.  M33 and the M31 group were both exquisite in the superb conditions; I don’t know that I could’ve taken notes on them given the ridiculous amount of detail they offered tonight.

I felt no concern in observing at the site alone; the odds of being noticed up on the little bluff at night were as close to zero as to be insignificant, so I kept going, despite being tired enough to have stopped on a lesser night. The Local Group dwarf galaxy IC 1613 was clearly visible, showing both of its brighter patches of stars; I also took a side trip to Hickson 10, one of the brighter Hickson groups, up in Andromeda. I was struck by the two white pinpoint stars of Gamma Arietis, one of the best double stars in the sky (and certainly in the autumn sky)—the steady seeing showed the double so perfectly that it held my attention for several minutes, and I kept subconsciously nudging the telescope to follow it. At NAU, doing Friday night outreach (had we still been there, we might’ve called our events Friday Night Starlights), an Indian woman once commented that Gamma Arietis resembled the eyes of God staring back at her. Watching the scintillating double now, I could agree.

But the real showstopper of the night was the last. I decided to track down and take notes on Maffei 1, a nearby galaxy obscured by thick clouds of dust strewn throughout the southern reaches of Cassiopeia (the galaxy’s “host” constellation). The easiest route to Maffei 1 was to hop from the Double Cluster in bordering Perseus, but once I settled on the Double Cluster, I stopped there.

Even under merely-decent conditions, the Double Cluster is the showpiece object of the autumn. Under tonight’s conditions, I’m sure I swore as I settled at the eyepiece. The stars in the cluster weren’t simply brilliant—they were laser-beam steady, and almost piercingly bright. And in the view I had, with both clusters spilling their starpoints across the 42′ field, there was a sense of depth beyond any view I’d had through this finest of my telescopes… or indeed any telescope. Some of the stars were of a quality that spoke of greater proximity to Earth—a three-dimensional view to rival an actual binocular scope, the stars themselves providing the depth of field. I felt I could’ve picked out the closest of the cluster’s stars with confidence… a feeling I’d never had before looking into the eyepiece, and most certainly an illusion cast by the extraordinary sky conditions. In particular, a ring of whitish stars within the southern component of the Double Cluster (NGC 869) shone like proverbial diamonds, the stars around them yielding their brightness to the glory of their brighter siblings. The effect was mesmerizing, and when, after star hopping to where Maffei 1 should’ve been and not seeing it (I had seen it several times before), I simply returned to the Double Cluster and stared at the stunning sight until my music playlist looped around to the beginning again and I realized there could be nothing on the night to surpass what I had just seen.

 

 

 

New Falls Yet Unborn

I. It was a full month before we again had conditions conducive for astronomy in the Willamette Valley. My last excursion had included a long-overdue observation of Messier 101, which included two of its nebulae among the Herschel lists, but that was at the beginning of June; now, at the beginning of July, we were finally seeing some clearing in the skies that would allow us to observe what lay beyond the atmosphere.

July 3rd and 4th found us at Eagle’s Ridge, on the spur road. With a temporary hiatus in Herschel hunting enforced by the arrival of the summer constellations (which I had already swept for all of their Herschel 400/HII objects), I chose to make some headway on the Astronomical League’s double-star observing program, using my 70mm TeleVue Pronto instead of my trusted 12.5″ scope, Bob the Dob. This also allowed me to take some time to put the Pronto through its paces on deep-sky objects, from globular clusters to large-scale nebulae.

On the 4th, Jerry brought up his homemade beer-can rocket, and we launched it a number of times before observing (including one launch that nearly ended up on the roof of Frank’s van). As it got darker, we trained our scopes on the light glow of Eugene and Springfield, watching the 4th of July fireworks of the twin cities from our perch a mile above.

Those couple of nights were the extent of our observing during the June/July moon-dark phase.  As with so much of the summer, clouds and unseasonal weather wiped out most of the rest.  But astronomy doesn’t simply stop when the sky isn’t cooperative, or when the Moon is too obtrusive; there are a number of other ways to keep the hobby alive when observing isn’t possible.

Among these is the search for new, possibly-better sites to observe from, and this is pretty much an ongoing concern—even though we liked our present lineup of observing locations, none was 100% perfect, and there was no reason that they couldn’t be replaced by something better. Eagle’s Ridge had the terrible rough gravel road for the last half-mile and was gradually losing its sky darkness; the Eagle’s Rest gravel pit was too often used by the timber companies or that special type of citizen who used his cache of overpowered weapons to fill the area with broken glass and porcelain and things that burned or blew up when struck by bullets; Eureka Ridge wasn’t quite as dark as we’d like and suffered from overly-dewy conditions too often; Champion Saddle was a treacherous, longer drive that was difficult to drive home from without enough sleep.

So the search for the perfect site was endless, and during the week of the waxing gibbous Moon, while studying local Clear Sky Charts, I stumbled across the CSC for Cascadia State Park. The chart indicated the site to be a Bortle 3/2 transition zone—slightly darker than Eagle’s Ridge—and a cursory scan of Google Earth turned up a large meadow in the middle of the park, one which might be usable by a dozen or so amateur astronomers to plumb the depths of space from its confines. So on a mid-month Saturday Mrs. Caveman and I made the 75-minute drive to the park (eager dogs in tow) to check its suitability.

We were somewhat impressed. Although the meadow was near the edge of the South Santiam River, and was likely to attract dew from the river to its grassy surface, there was as much usable sky as at the gravel pit, with none of the broken glass and occasionally-smoldering fires that we found at the pit (and no lumber trucks, such as had recently taken up parking at the pit). As a bonus, the staff seemed amenable to us using the site. On the downside, we’d have to share the park with any overnight campers that might cross the line from curiosity into rudeness, if only just using flashlights or car/truck headlights; the possibility of light trespass from the permanent existing facilities was also a high one. The next step, we all agreed on, was to actually observe there on a night around Third-Quarter Moon, when we’d have some dark sky but not so much that we’d feel we’d wasted a night if the site turned out to not be suitable.

It was in the ensuing e-mail list chatter that another possibility arose. Mark W had a site he’d been using between Walton and Mapleton—west of Eugene—when working on his astrophotography; he’d mentioned it before at an EAS meeting, and it had seemed then to be too far a drive for last-minute observing sessions. But I made a note to check it out anyway, intrigued by Mark’s description, and even as Jerry and I were making arrangements to observe from Cascadia, I took the opportunity to check out Mark’s site near Linslaw County Park.

To say I was sold on Mark’s site at first glance wouldn’t be an exaggeration. The site was spectacular, even in the daytime. It was somewhat tricky to get to, requiring either a left turn from the highway’s left-hand passing lane to get to the gravel road to the site, or pulling off at a roadside rest stop/boat-loading dock and then heading eastbound for a quarter-mile before making a right onto the gravel.

The gravel was really well maintained—unlike the awful final stretch to Eagle’s Ridge, and even better than the improved gravel road to Eureka. The worst part was (again!) the last half-mile, which was in good shape but very steep. The Caveman-Mobile managed it with ease, however, and I immediately felt eager to bring a scope out to the place. (We also stopped to check out the secondary site about 2/3 of the way up; it too was a good site, although the horizons were more compromised.)

LinslawPan1

LinslawPan2

Panoramic views of Linslaw Point. The small sandstone bluff blocks the view low to the northeast—thus shielding the observers from much of the Eugene/Springfield light dome.

LinslawSsmall

View roughly to the south from the observing site.

I posted several pictures of the site (including the ones above) to the EAS e-mail list, and we pledged that the next clear night would be an audition for the new site. Loren, too, drove up to the site to check it out and proclaimed it a winner. It took little convincing, on the night of the 23rd, to forego our existing sites for the new one, quickly dubbed Linslaw Point.

We arrived there well before sunset on the 23rd, including several of us who had not yet been there (I recall Jerry, Mark, Loren, and possibly Dan B being there). The daytime view got a universal thumbs-up. Alas, the clouds and haze arrived shortly after we did, and before long, the sky was well and thoroughly covered.

I had been tracking down the Libra galaxy NGC 5791, the lone Herschel object of summer  I was missing (aside from NGC 6543, The Cat’s Eye Nebula, which is circumpolar and observable nearly any time of year) when the clouds swamped everything. Had it been a half-hour later, I could’ve taken notes on the galaxy and moved on. As it was, I had at least memorized a useful route to the galaxy that I could use on the next night up.

Despite the crummy skies, the site had already given more than a hint about its potential, and the next night’s forecast looked considerably better. So out I went the next night, armed with the club’s brand-new Sky Quality Meter for measuring the sky darkness (given that Jerry wasn’t able to make it that night with his own SQM), hoping to get good readings myself. But before I took any readings of the sky darkness, I made sure to capture the notes I needed for NGC 5791. Only Jeff L was willing and able to make the trip up, but I was greatly appreciative to have someone to vouch for the night’s stunning skies.

We started with a fine transit of Jupiter’s moon Ganymede at 9:19, when I first turned my scope upon it (in order to align my Telrad finder to the optical axis of the scope itself).

07/24-07/25/19
LINSLAW POINT (43 58’ 48” N. 123 42’ 4” W)
SUNSET: 8:45 PM
MOON: 23 days (rose at 12:47 AM; 39%  illuminated)
SEEING: 6
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.69 (10:45); 21.73 (11:15); 21.70 (12:15, west); 21.46 (12:15, east)
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps low 50s, some breeze, no dew, mosquitoes
OTHERS PRESENT: Jeff L

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:19
NGC 5791, IC 1081 (Lib): I originally missed this one because it wasn’t on the version of the HII list I’d been using; I only caught it in a cross-check. It was therefore not an ideal observation due to the galaxy being past the meridian and moving into the muck near the horizon. It’s also still not totally dark, but I’ve been following the galaxy for 20 minutes as the sky darkens, waiting for it to be prominent enough to take acceptable notes–last night, I had similarly locked on to the galaxy, but clouds had washed it out before I could take notes on it. (I actually found it tonight by remembering the field from last night.) It’s fairly small, 0.75’ x 0.3’, and elongated N-S. It has a very diffuse halo, but that may be a function of the sky conditions. The poorly-defined halo comes very suddenly to a small brighter core and a mostly-stellar nucleus. The galaxy is NP a large right triangle of brighter stars in the 8th/9th magnitude range. S slightly F the galaxy by 4.75’ is a 9.5-magnitude star that’s the closest (to the galaxy) vertex of the right triangle; the RA vertex is due SF the galaxy by 12’, and is 8.5 magnitude; the third (and brightest at 8th magnitude) vertex is F very slightly S the galaxy by 14’; the triangle spans 7’ x 8.5’ x 12’. F very slightly S of the galaxy by 3’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; forming an almost-equilateral triangle with the galaxy and the 12.5-magnitude star is another galaxy (IC 1081
) which is NF 5791: this galaxy is very very difficult and primarily an averted-vision object, although every now and again it shows steadily in direct vision. It’s very hard to tell the galaxy’s orientation or size but there’s definitely something there that’s smaller than 5791 and much dimmer.

Having caught NGC 5791—one of my primary goals for the evening—I decided it was time to break out the SQM. Standard procedure was to aim the device’s lens toward an area of the sky free of the Milky Way or a number of brighter stars; at this time of year, that usually was best done in the constellation Corona Borealis. I took six readings—three at 10:45 and three a half-hour later. The 10:45 results were 21.73, 21.69, and 21.69; the 11:15 results were 21.76, 21.73, 21.74. (The numbers here indicate the number of magnitudes per square arcsecond; the higher the number, the darker the sky.) As the first result of each set was usually somewhat discrepant, this led to averages of 21.69 and 21.74. These readings were substantially better than those at Eagle’s Ridge and Eureka Ridge, which averaged 21.5 and 21.3, respectively. Evidence, then, that Linslaw was quantitatively better than either of our other sites!

After one forgotten Herschel, I turned the scope toward one that I’d been avoiding for some time; with no others above the horizon until Auriga rose, I decided to tackle this final necessary summer target.

11:54
NGC 6543, IC 4677, NGC 6552 (Dra): The Cat’s Eye Nebula! I’ve skipped this one a lot over the years of doing this Herschel project, but I’m going to do it now because I have no other Herschels in the summer. This is one of the brightest of all planetary nebulae. It spans 0.3’ x 0.25’ and is oriented N very very slightly F-S very very slightly P. There’s a definite annulus or darker region around the 12th-magnitude central star, which is somewhat drowned in the brightness of the nebula. The nebula itself is definitely irregularly-illuminated internally, even at this magnification. A ghostly fringe around the perimeter of the nebula extends its size by a few arcseconds, but blurs into the annulus in moments of poorer seeing. P very slightly N of the nebula by 2.75’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; N very very slightly P the nebula by 2.25’ is a 13th-magnitude star. NF the nebula by 5.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star, and also NF by 12’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; these are in a line with the nebula. Almost due F the nebula by 8.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that is the third in an arc from SP-NF, but the arc itself isn’t important; F slightly S of that star by 2.5’ is a little fuzzy spot, a galaxy (NGC 6552): it’s elongated P very very slightly N-F very very slightly S, 0.75’ x 0.3’. The galaxy has a very very faint nucleus that pops out more in averted, but not much visible core. The halo is quite diffuse. The galaxy forms an almost-equilateral triangle with the star P it and a star SF that star by 2.25’; the second star is [bright satellite thru the field!] 13th magnitude. The brightest star in the field is 20’ S very slightly P the nebula and is 9th magnitude; it has a 12th-magnitude companion 0.75’ N very slightly F it [another, very very slow satellite wanders through the field!]; there’s also a 9.5-magnitude star 24’ NP the nebula. With the OIII filter in place, the nebula swells to just over 1.0’ in diameter. I’m trying to spot the “detached” or brighter section of the halo but the magnification is probably too low. Lots of cottony outer texture; the inner region is “overexposed” looking. In averted vision, I think I’m getting the detached piece (IC 4677
); it lies halfway between the nebula and the star P very very slightly N–really tough!! It’s now definite in averted; it seems elongated a bit P-F, 0.3’ long, but hard to hold at this magnification/aperture; the best view in averted is toward the bright star to the south. In the 6mm Radian (262x, 0.2˚ TFOV) the detached piece is still visible, but not with OIII in (the filter renders the field too dark).

But the highlight of the night was the Milky Way itself. Visible best in truly dark skies, the vast spiral form of the galaxy arched overhead here at Linslaw, a glittering, gossamer buttress holding the firmament aloft. Here and there the galaxy-glow condensed into clouds or tiny star-filled patches, interspersed with inky black blots and streaks composed of silicate dusts and organic molecules. I spent a fair amount of time observing the splendor with the naked eye and some further with my 11 x 80 binoculars; The Pipe Nebula was blatantly obvious to the unaided eye, even with brilliant Jupiter close enough to cause it to lose some contrast; Barnard’s E, near Altair, was huge and opaque in the binoculars; and the Veil Nebula was a scatter of ghostly cobwebs to the binoculars as well.

In the telescope, the big, bright showpiece globular clusters (M4, M22, M13, M5, and M15) were the best I’ve ever seen them; I even caught the small, vaporously-faint galaxy IC 4617 that lurks nearby M13—the first time I’d ever caught it in my own scope. I also tracked down the tricky Local Group galaxy IC 10, a dwarf galaxy in Cassiopeia (although I had seen this one a few times before—although not as clearly as on this night). Perhaps the telescopic highlight, though, was the region around M11, the Wild Duck Cluster; sweeping through this area brought up not only the stunning cluster (and a few others), it also revealed the traceries and clouds of dark nebulosity that littered the region around the cluster itself. After observing M11 more than a hundred times, this was seeing the cluster and its surroundings as if for the first time.

I took final SQM readings at 12:15. In Corona—now just above the muck on the western horizon—these yielded scores of 21.71, 21.70, and 21.67. Out of curiosity, I also took readings on the other side of the summer Milky Way—in the Great Square of Pegasus—getting readings of 21.5, 21.46, and 21.48. Even just above the Eugene light glow, Linslaw was as good as a good night at Eagle’s Ridge. The only seeming drawback was the presence of a not-insignificant amount of fairly-desperate and determined mosquitoes, whose shrill whines were loud enough to pick up on my voice memos from the evening.

This was a big deal. With a darker site available so relatively nearby, there was now no essential reason to have to punish my van with the last treacherous climb to the top of Eagle’s Ridge. While not exactly a stone’s throw away from home, Linslaw was even closer than Eagle’s was. The new site might truly be our Eureka! site, one that we could everyone could agree was the most ideal of all the places we observed from.  There was hardly even any dew to speak of—yet another plus in Linslaw’s favor.

I was elated as I drove home, the thought of never again having to drive up to Eagle’s Ridge to access dark skies keeping me alert along the twisting, construction-filled drive into the Eugene light pollution and home.

II. Two nights later, we found ourselves back at Linslaw for a night’s observing. This time, I decided to bring the heavy artillery, a.k.a. the 18″ Dobsonian that’s the flagship scope of the EAS lending library. I also had a list of targets suitable for the larger aperture, and the intent to have a less-structured, more fun-oriented evening at the site while putting the darker sky and the bigger scope through their paces.

07/26-07/27/19
LINSLAW POINT
SUNSET: 8:43 PM
MOON: 25 days (rose at 1:46 AM; 20%  illuminated)
SEEING: variable 6-7
TRANSPARENCY: 7+
SQM: 21.72
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to low 50s, some breeze, no dew; Ursa Major heading into light glow/city lights
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DB, FS, MW

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

I took no notes on the evening, which was something of a mistake—especially given the objects I managed to track down. Most of these were targets I’d never seen before, some of which I’d never even had the chance to observe previously.

These targets included three of the more-northern Terzan globulars (1, 2, and/or 4; I observed two of the three as “just on the verge of visibility; I could tell something was there but couldn’t see them well enough to claim that I’d seen them, and my recap of the night is too uncertain about which two I had observed); the globulars HP1, Palomar 12, and Palomar 6 (more on the latter later); a number of Messier objects (including M55, M13, and a best-ever view of M27, the Dumbbell Nebula); the tiny IC 4617, lurking nearby M13; Aquila’s NGC globulars, NGCs 6749 and 6760; the flat galaxy UGC 10227 in Corona Borealis, just N of the bright variable star Tau CrB (Jerry confirmed this one, as it was still very very difficult); Abell 72, a planetary nebula in Delphinus; and an astounding view of the Helix Nebula in Aquarius.

III. Our yearly Dexter Star Party, held at the Dexter State Recreation Area, took place the next night, on the 27th. This year, EAS made a huge promotional push for the event, and we were rewarded with 300+ attendees from the regional public and probably thirty telescopes among club members and from among the community. The event received raves from the attendees and brought in a number of new members to EAS; I even had a couple of people approach me in the darkness and say that they recognized my voice from the previous year’s star party.

The night after, we returned to Linslaw, hoping to make further use of the forecast and the site’s superior darkness. Many of the regulars weren’t keen to make the trip, after the strenuous night before; Oggie and Leticia made their first trip up to the “summit,” and Mark W was there already before I got there, setting up his gear for a night of astrophotography. With Oggie came a group of his coworkers (about five of them), and he spent the early part of the evening giving them an orientation on the sky and showing them the splendors of Jupiter and Saturn.

I had a list of difficult summer targets for the 12.5″, but as the night fell and the wind picked up—and it certainly made its presence felt—I was less inclined to go after user-faint objects and more in the mood to let my atlas show me things to look for.

07/28-07/29/19
LINSLAW POINT
SUNSET: 8:41 PM
MOON: 27 days (rose at 3:12 AM; 6%  illuminated)
SEEING: 6
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.7
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps low 50s, cold, windy; wind rumble on audio, slightly dewy
OTHERS PRESENT: OG, Leticia, coworkers, MW

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:26
NGC 6026 (Lup): This is a really difficult target this low, and I’m not totally sure why I chose to include it in my list. The UHC filter barely shows the nebula, but I’m not really keen to throw the OIII in given its threading issues. The nebula spans 0.67’ x 0.5’, and is elongated P-F, almost boxy. There’s just a very very faint trace of a central star visible with the filter in place. SF the nebula by 7.5’ is the brightest star (and right angle vertex) in a small right triangle. With filter still in place, the nebula looks a little brighter on its P end–it’s really just a ghost, at only 5˚ above horizon at best. Without the filter, I can still see the nebula very faintly around the central star, which is 12th magnitude giving an “extinction allowance” for its super-low altitude. The bright star, the RA vertex, is 8th magnitude; SP it by 4’ is the second vertex, which is double (a 10.5-magnitude star and a 12th-magnitude star separated by 0.25’, with the brighter P slightly N the fainter); the third vertex of the right triangle is SF the RA vertex by 6.5’ and is 10.5 magnitude. NP the nebula is a pattern of six main stars which consists of a small isosceles triangle at the F end of an arc of stars that runs P-F; the triangle is an almost perfect triangle; the long P face is 2.5’ and the third star is due F; the three stars are 11/12.5 magnitudes; the triangle’s two sides are 1.75’ long; the P face runs N-S; from the N-most vertex due P by 3.75’ is the F end of the arc, and that star is [a satellite cuts through the field] 11.5 magnitude; there’s another 11.5-magnitude star due P the first by 2.5’, while another of the same brightness is P very very slightly S of the second one by 1.5’.

Oggie’s crew left shortly after this; the chill and the mountain winds had made staying around something of an ordeal. Mark and I pressed on, each of us single-mindedly focused on our goals for the session.

12:43
NGCs 6962, 6964, 6967, 6959 (Aqr): Galaxies abounding here. I’ve seen this group several times, including at OSP ‘16 with the 18” scope. There are four little galaxies here, with 6962 the brightest. It’s located between two fairly bright stars. The galaxy is 0.75’ round and comes very gradually to a smallish brighter core; it appears at moments of good seeing to have a stellar nucleus. It has a very poorly defined halo. NGC 6962 is the brightest of the four galaxies in the field; S slightly F the galaxy by 1.75’ is the second-brightest in the group (6964). This one is smaller and fainter than 6962, elongated N-S, and subtends 0.67’ x 0.5’. It has a very small, also gradually arrived at core and possible stellar nucleus that can’t be held steadily even in averted vision. This second galaxy is poorly-defined as well, somewhat more gossamer than 6962. S slightly F by 0.5’ from the galaxy’s possible nucleus is a 13.5-magnitude star; 9’ due SP 6962 is the second-brightest star in the field (at 9th magnitude); P very very slightly N the galaxy by 5.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. P slightly S of the galaxy by 2.25’ is the F-most vertex of a small flat isosceles triangle, the three stars of which are all 11.5/12th magnitude; from the first vertex P very slightly S by 1.25’ is the second vertex; from the second vertex SP by 1.5’ is the third vertex. NF 6962 by 7’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; due P that star by 0.75’ is another galaxy (6967): this one is elongated P-F, 0.67’ x 0.3’, and has a quite diffuse halo and a small somewhat brighter core but no nucleus. NP 6962 by 7.5’ is a small triangle of fainter (12.5/13th magnitude) stars; 1.5’ F the N-most and brightest of these stars is the fourth galaxy (6959), which is N slightly P 6962 by 7.5’ and is the faintest of the four galaxies. It’s 0.3’ x 0.25’, elongated P very slightly S-F very slightly N, and has a small, very slightly brighter core that’s not very distinct; it may also have a possible very very faint stellar nucleus, but I can’t confirm this. The galaxy is F very very slightly N of the N-most vertex of the little triangle. F somewhat S of 6962 by 19’ is the brightest star in the field, which is 7.5 magnitude.

I also spent some of my Aquarius time tracking down the difficult globular NGC 7492, the faintest of the three in the constellation and one of the more difficult of the NGC globulars.  I had seen it from Carbondale, though, so it apparently wasn’t that difficult.

1:43
NGC 7040 (Equ): This galaxy is an unusual choice for observing tonight–it’s the brightest in Equuleus, but not much of a galaxy, really. (Of course, it’s still an entire galaxy, and therefore deserves some study.) It’s a very diffuse, unconcentrated, largely featureless round glow, spanning 0.67’ diameter, maybe slightly less. It may have a little bit of N-S elongation to it, but this is very tenuous. It looks like there’s a threshold star just on the S edge of the halo (this may account for the appearance of elongation). The core is barely brighter than the halo, but it does appear as if there’s a very very faint stellar nucleus. F slightly S of the galaxy by 2.75’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s another 12th-magnitude star SsF that star by 1.75’. P slightly S of the galaxy by 20’ is the second-brightest in the field at 8.5 magnitude. A reddish star to the SF is the brightest in the field, 20’ SF the galaxy, and is 7.5 magnitude. (Here the transparency clears a bit.) Due N of the galaxy by 9’ is a 10.5-magnitude star that has 1.5’ NP it a 12th-magnitude star; from the 10.5-magnitude star N by 6’ is another of magnitude 10.5 that also has a 12.5-magnitude star 1.25’ NP it.

Around this point, I started feeling considerably fatigued. It had been a long week already, and the late night at Dexter was taking its toll. But the sky was still outstanding, and despite the cold and the knife-like breeze, I wasn’t yet ready to pack things up.

With Vega still fairly high in the sky—and out of the dreaded “Dob Hole,” the area around the zenith (straight overhead) which is difficult for Dobsonian-mounted scopes to navigate—I turned to an old posting on the Deep Sky Forum for my next few targets; these would carry over to the next couple of trips out.

2:03
NGC 6646, IC 1288 (Lyr): Back in July 2014, one of the Deep Sky Forum “Object of the Week” threads featured a scattering of galaxies north of Vega (see here). I’d also read an article many years ago in Deep Sky Magazine regarding “Galaxies Along the Summer Milky Way” by Ernie Ostuno, and those two sources spurred me on to hunt down the “Vega Chain.” The first of these on my list was NGC 6646. This is a little galaxy, possibly elliptical, possibly spiral based on its appearance in the eyepiece [it’s an Sa spiral]. The galaxy is roundish, 1.0’ across, and pretty impressive for being located in the middle of the Milky Way. The halo is quite diffuse and poorly defined; there’s not much of a brighter core, but there may be a substellar nucleus. The interior/brighter core region looks almost “lumpy” or irregular. The galaxy lies wedged between an 8.5-magnitude star 3.75’ to the N and a 9.5-magnitude star 3.25’ to the SF; there’s also a 9th-magnitude star SP the galaxy by 8’; from this last star SF is a small, faint isosceles triangle of 12th/13th-magnitude stars with its two base stars to the P and its point to the F slightly N; in the middle of the triangle’s S edge is another galaxy (IC 1288). This one’s elongated N-S, 0.5’ x 0.25’. It almost looks like two small galaxies in contact. Averted vision helps tremendously here, as the stars in the triangle make it hard to focus on the galaxy. The more-S of the pair of stars making up the triangle’s base, the SP vertex, is the brightest at 12th magnitude, and the other two are 13th magnitude. The triangle is 0.5’ on the base to the P and then 2’ on the two longer sides. The little galaxy has a fairly diffuse halo and a “double-looking” core but no trace of a nucleus [a threshold star on the N end contributes to the “double” appearance of the core]. The galaxy gives the triangle a nebulous appearance, like nebulosity throughout the stars a la Maffei 1; there are a couple of threshold stars in the immediate area.

2:29
NGC 6675 (Lyr): A little brighter and more visible than NGC 6646, this galaxy has a little elongation NP-SF and spans 0.75’ x 0.3’. Its poorly-defined halo is quite diffuse and the galaxy is very low in central concentration, with a somewhat largish core that’s not much brighter than the halo; no nucleus or other detail is visible. The galaxy has due N of it and due P it a pair of 13th-magnitude stars; the star to the N is 1.25’ from the galaxy, and the star to the P is 2’ from the galaxy. NF the galaxy is a longish asterism of indeterminate shape; this contains a number of 10th/11th-magnitude stars and is 12’ long, comprising fourteen stars in two N-S sections. There may be another galaxy in the field, due F the first by 5.5’… or just a knot of threshold stars?? [According to the POSS plate, it’s the latter.] This galaxy or knot is 0.5’ and roundish; there’s definitely at least one star, and in averted a few others are visible with some nebulous fuzz (?), perhaps a galaxy with a nucleus and a threshold star on it? [no] The brightest star in the region is a 6th-magnitude star 24’ S slightly F the galaxy (just outside field); 26’ [so outside field] due F the galaxy is a 7.5th-magnitude star.

The conditions won out. It had only dropped into the low 50s, but I’d been wearing my winter coat/gloves/hat and multiple other layers for much of the evening and still couldn’t warm up. Having reached a good break point, I called it a night; Mark stayed to continue work on his image(s) of M33. Much as I disliked leaving someone alone at an observing site, I also knew that Mark was closer to home at Linslaw than any of us, and that it was the least likely of all of our sites to attract visitors, four-legged or otherwise.

IV. Part of the next day was spent exchanging e-mails with Attila Danko, the creator of the Clear Sky Chart—much the most popular astronomy forecast site and app, the CSC was invaluable for determining where and when to make the trek to observe for a given night. Jerry and I had asked for a chart to be made for the Linslaw site, as we’d decided to make it an “official” EAS observing spot. As he had done for Eureka Ridge a few years earlier, Danko had a CSC made within an hour or so after our first e-mails to him. Now that we had four actual sites on the CSC website, we felt it only appropriate to donate to the site as well, to contribute to the site’s operating fund.  It was the least we could do.

The new CSC showed clear but somewhat hazy skies at Linslaw (and at our other sites), so between the forecast and the fatigue from the past week of observing, we decided to take the night off in favor of the next few nights that looked more promising.

So with a night’s rest, a group of us headed back out to Linslaw for a night of Dobsonian shenanigans: Jerry and Dan R had the 20″ TriDob, Loren had Orion, EAS’ 14.7″ club-built Dob, and Bob A—a retired math professor with a 10″ Trackball scope and a non-stop sense of humor—made his first foray to one of the club’s private observing sessions in quite some time. It made for a lively evening of obscure witticisms and hugely intertextual conversation (the best kind of conversation, actually) in addition to the wonders of deep space as seen from 21.7 skies.

07/30-07/31/19
LINSLAW POINT 
SUNSET: 8:39 PM
MOON: New
SEEING: 7
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.68
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps in low 50s, cool, windy; loud wind rumble on audio
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DR, LR, Bob A

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

I started out, unsurprisingly, with another vision-straining target.

10:42
Palomar 6 (Sgr): This globular is damn near invisible. It’s one that I’m going to have to sit on the ground to get–down into the dirt for me, and super-low in the sky for the scope. The cluster is almost exactly between and slightly N of a pair of brighter stars (8.5 and 10th magnitudes); it’s a little closer to the 8.5-magnitude star, which is SF the cluster. The globular itself is just an averted-vision glimmer, a phantasm with fleeting moments of direct-vision visibility. (Trying to guess its Shapley-Sawyer class would be an exercise in futility.) It’s 1.25’ across, and lies 6’ NP the 8.5-magnitude star and 8’ F slightly N of the 10th-magnitude star. NF the cluster by 5.5’ is a pair: the more-P star is 11.5 magnitude, and the more-F is 12.5 magnitude (they’re oriented N very very slightly P-S very very slightly F to each other, with the brighter to the N, and separated by 0.75’). The cluster is definitely there but very tough–as difficult as anything I’ve ever confirmed a sighting of. Wow…!

I also re-observed the obscure cluster AL3 in Sagittarius, which I had first observed at the Brothers Star Party back in 2017—exactly two years ago. AL3 was among the easiest objects I would observe on this particular night.

11:54
UGC 10288 (Ser): This exceedingly-difficult flat galaxy is up near NGC 6118, the first Herschel object I took notes on and my starting point for the whole Herschel project. The ghostly galaxy crops up mostly in averted vision but I can just pick it out in direct, and with considerable effort can hold it in direct vision. It’s 1.75’ x super super thin, maybe 0.125’ tops. There’s no internal detail visible whatsoever, no concentration to be noted–I’m lucky to see it at all. It’s bounded by 13th-magnitude and 9th-magnitude stars, with two other 8th-magnitude stars in the field making the galaxy tougher to see; the 13th-magnitude star is 3.75’ SF and the 9th-magnitude 4.75’ NP the galaxy. 12’ SF the galaxy is one of the 8th-magnitude stars; the other is F very slightly S of the galaxy by 9’, and this one is the RA vertex of a large right triangle that includes the two 8th magnitude stars and the 9th-magnitude star; the RA vertex has 3.75’ N very slightly P it an 11.5-magnitude star. This galaxy is almost as tough as Pal 6! SP the galaxy by 9’ is a 10.5-magnitude star that turns the right triangle into a box.

The next pair of objects had caught my eye on the interstellarum atlas charts, and I had followed up with a Sky & Telescope website article about them. They made a fine pair of pleasantly-easy targets on a night when most others were various shades of “ridiculously difficult.”

1:03
NGCs 6835, 6836 (Sgr): NGC 6835 is obviously an edge-on galaxy, spanning 1.25’ x 0.5’ and elongated P-F. It has the faintest amount of central brightening and, just for a moment, a flash of a very very faint stellar nucleus. The halo is quite well-defined, even “sharp” on the edges. F the galaxy to the N and S are a pair: a 13.5-magnitude star just off the F end to the F very slightly S, and a 14th-magnitude star to the NF, just outside the galaxy’s F end. 3.25’ P very slightly N of the galaxy is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s a 10.5-magnitude star N very slightly F by 6’, and that star is the S-most vertex of an isosceles triangle; N very slightly P the 10.5-magnitude star by 7.5’ is an 8.5-magnitude star, and the third vertex is N very very slightly F the first by 5’ and is a double (10th and 11th magnitudes, with the fainter N very very slightly P the brighter by 8”). From the galaxy SP by 10’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; S slightly P that star by 8’ is an 8.5-magnitude star. S of the galaxy by 3.75’ is the N-most vertex of a small triangle of 12.5/13.5-magnitude stars; S of that triangle by 3.75’  (7.5’ S of 6835) is a very diffuse companion galaxy, NGC 6836: this galaxy is 0.75’ across, probably face-on. It’s irregularly bright across its face, but without much central concentration; the halo comes very very gradually to a slightly brighter core, but no nucleus is noted. P this galaxy by 2’ and F very slightly N by 4.75’ are a pair of 12th-magnitude stars that extend the size of the fainter triangle of 12.5/13.5-magnitude stars by a great deal, with the faint triangle “on top” of the larger one.

I did some cursory looking around for the final hour, picking up a number of the usual objects for this time of year: M15, M2, M31 & company, M33, the Double Cluster, NGC 7331/the Deer Lick Group (God, how I hate that nickname) and Stephan’s Quintet… these pretty much get looked at every evening in the fall—along with Uranus and Neptune these years—even if I don’t necessarily explicitly say so. (They’re like the globulars of summer, M11, and the Ring, Lagoon, Veil, and Dumbbell Nebulae in that regard.) Often, these are the final objects of the evening, or are interspersed among the fainter objects so as to give my eyes a break. Tonight, they were the aperitif to an evening of the obscure and the eye-watering… a theme that would continue the rest of the July/August Moon-dark run.

V. The next promising forecast—for a night that I wasn’t overly exhausted—was for two nights later. This time, Eagle’s Ridge was the “site of best forecast,” so despite my reticence at ever making that drive again, I was up for observing there given the predictions for the rest of the week.

Dan B was the only other to make the trek out, and he couldn’t stay long; I chose only a couple of leftover targets from my previous lists and prepared for a short session.

As darkness fell, Dan and I noted that there was… less of it than usual. The sky at the spur road seemed grayer than before. Trees had been cleared along the north ridge, so that the light pollution from Eugene and Springfield was more pervasive; perhaps the air was more saturated or dusty than usual, and these two factors conspired to make the darkness seem less deep. The SQM readings—averaging 21.44—weren’t bad, but were still somewhat below average for the site.

I started off looking for UGC 10362, a flat galaxy in Ophiuchus; I’m pretty sure I saw it, but couldn’t confirm it. (It was a poor choice for the first object of the night, admittedly.)

08/01-08/02/19
EAGLE’S RIDGE (spur road)
SUNSET: 8:36 PM
MOON: 1 day (set at 9:27 PM; 2%  illuminated)
SEEING: 7
TRANSPARENCY: 6-7
SQM: 21.44
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps mid 50s, air still; some dew and evident forest-fire smoke visible
OTHERS PRESENT: DB 

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:42
NGC 6537 (Sgr): I didn’t expect to take notes tonight, due to the skyglow and smoke and poor-looking transparency. This is the Red Spider Nebula, and I’m using the 10mm Delos for this miniscule planetary. The nebula is just barely distinguishable from a star because of its perimeter fuzziness, and is grey rather than even the slightest tinge reddish (of course). It’s very very small–even with the OIII filter, it’s no more than 5” across. It appears that the central star may just be visible; the nebula comes to a very sharp central point, and the outer fuzz is mostly visible in averted vision. It also, at some moments, seems to be slightly elongated SP-NF. The nebula is the SF vertex of a triangle that includes two 12th-magnitude stars, one of which is P very slightly N of the nebula by 1.5’ and the other which is N very very slightly P that star by 1.5’. Also visible NF the nebula by 0.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star; there’s another 14th-magnitude star NP that star by 1’; the nebula is therefore at the juncture of two triangles. Due N of the nebula by 4.25’ is a double/close pair: the slightly-brighter star is S slightly F the fainter by 0.25’, and these are approximately 13.5 magnitude. Due NF the nebula by 7’ is the brightest star in the field, which is 7th magnitude; F very slightly N of that star by 6’ is a 9th-magnitude star.

The next target was several objects in one, and had been on my list all summer.

11:48
NGCs 6500, 6501, 6495, 6490 (Her): This is an interesting quartet of faint galaxies, consisting of a bright(er) pair of which NGC 6500 is the larger but not necessarily the brighter. 6500 and the galaxy N very very slightly F of it are both fairly obvious and somewhat elongated; 6500 has slight SP-NF elongation, subtending 1.0’ x 0.67’. It has quite a diffuse, not super-well defined halo, with a brighter core and a fairly bright stellar nucleus, and is much more diffuse than the smaller galaxy to the N. The companion galaxy (NGC 6501) 2.25’ to the N very very slightly F is smaller and has a brighter core than 6500 and an obvious stellar nucleus. It too is elongated S slightly P-N slightly F, and spans 0.75’ x 0.5’. NP the galaxy by 1’ is a 14.5-magnitude star; 6500 has P very slightly N of it by 1.5’ a 13.5-magnitude star. F very very slightly S of 6500 by 5.5’ is a beautiful pair of white 8th-magnitude stars that have to be a true double; they’re P-F each other by 4”. N slightly P the double by 2.75’ is the brighter of another pair that could also be double, with the brighter N of the fainter by 0.25’; these are 12th and 13th magnitudes. SF the brighter double by 4’ is the NF and brightest vertex of a tiny RA triangle; that vertex is 10th magnitude, and it has P it by 0.25’ a 13th-magnitude star that’s the RA vertex; there’s another 13th-magnitude star 0.67’ due S of the RA vertex that’s the third in the triangle. (The transparency’s weakening now; I’ve lost the other two galaxies.)…  17’ P NGC 6500 is the F-most of another pair of galaxies (NGC 6495): this galaxy is round and has some presence.  It’s 0.67’ round, pretty well defined and not super diffuse, with a considerably brighter core but no nucleus. F very slightly S of this galaxy by 2.5’ is an 12.5-magnitude star. NP the galaxy by 3’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; NP that star by 1.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star; due P this second star by 0.75’ is a fourth galaxy (6490) which is small, 0.5’ across, with a brighter core and a faint stellar nucleus that at moments is more visible than the rest of the galaxy. The halo is poorly defined and the galaxy is the faintest of the four. S slightly P this galaxy by 0.67’ is a 14.5-magnitude star. From the previous galaxy [6495] S very slightly P by 9’ is the brightest in the second field (i.e. with the second pair centered), which is 8th magnitude and is the S-most vertex of an isosceles triangle whose long side stretches N by 2.5’ to an 11th-magnitude star; SP the 11th-magnitude star by 1.75’ is the 12.5-magnitude third vertex.

I also spent some considerable time looking at the big summer nebulae with my 34mm Meade SWA, using a 2” OIII filter that I borrowed from Dan; these included the Gamma Cygni region, the North America Nebula, IC 1396, the Veil, and the Crescent Nebula, as well as the Helix Nebula. And as always, M15, Stephan’s Quintet and the NGC 7331 group.

The drive home from Linslaw was much more pleasant than the drive from Eagle’s, even with the late-night construction stoppages around Veneta, and I was exhausted by the time I pulled into the driveway.

VI. The night of August 2nd was held for the Veneta Star Party—an event hosted at the Veneta Public Library and primarily attended by kids. Dan B, Loren & Donna, Bob Andersen, and I loaded up scopes and hoped to beat the clouds to Veneta.

We didn’t. The clouds pretty much won out for the night; a couple of kids got to see Jupiter through gaps in the clouds, and I had Arcturus in the 18″ for those willing to climb the ladder to see a single star (an impressively-large number of kids, surprisingly). The best we could do was redirect everyone there to our upcoming First Quarter Friday event in Eugene and hope that it would be clear.

The night after, three of us convened at Linslaw again; the Moon was rapidly encroaching on the deeper hours of the night, and so time was drawing short for observing during this Moon-dark phase. The sky conditions were decidedly inferior to our previous nights at Linslaw, but were still better than we’d have gotten at either of our other sites.

08/03-08/04/19
LINSLAW POINT 
SUNSET: 8:34 PM
MOON: 3 days (set at 10:36 PM; 14% illuminated)
SEEING: 7
TRANSPARENCY: 6
SQM: 21.54 (west, CrB), 21.42 (Pegasus)
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps mid 50s, cool, slight breeze, no dew
OTHERS PRESENT: DB, AG

All observations: 12.5″ f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) or 10mm TeleVue Delos (157x, 0.5˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted 

10:48
UGC 10738 (Oph): I had to use the Delos to get much of anything from this exceedingly difficult flat galaxy, as even averted barely showed it in the 14mm; it’s still exceedingly difficult, but definitely there: a very very indistinct streak, elongated SP-NF, 0.75’ x 0.125’ (that’s probably not nearly its full extent). There’s no central concentration to the galaxy whatsoever, just a barely-there glow that was a ridiculous target to start the night with. The galaxy is 2.5’ due S of a 9.5-magnitude star; that star has N of it by 3.5’ a 12.5-magnitude star. P very slightly N of the 9.5-mag by another 2.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. [I may be getting the distance and magnitudes off a bit because I’m normally taking notes with the 14mm, which I’ve gotten used to, rather than the Delos, which I haven’t.] As it gets darker it’s very slightly easier to hold the galaxy steady. SP the galaxy by 2.25’ is a very faint smudge of several threshold stars; due P that smudge is a pair of 14.5-magnitude stars separated NP-SF by 0.25’. The most notable point of reference in the field is a slightly-curved line of four roughly-equally spaced 10th/11th-magnitude stars that lie SP the galaxy; the second in from the NP end is closest to the galaxy (P slightly S of the galaxy by 6’) and is 11th magnitude; the brightest (10th magnitude) of the four is SF that star by 1.75’; S of the second star by the exact same distance is another 11th-magnitude star; from the first star (second from the NP) N slightly P by 1.25’ is the faintest of the four (just past 11.5 magnitude). 

My paranoia about somehow damaging the Delos—and my interest in using a single eyepiece for the Herschel project—kept me from using the Delos as much as I should; it’s clearly the best (and most comfortable) eyepiece I own, and it impresses everyone who uses it. And it does indeed make an obvious difference in observing faint objects.

11:14
NGCs 6166, 6166C, 6158; PGCs 58277, 58232, 58324 (Her): Here in the heart of Abell 2199, just off the upper NW corner of the Keystone. This unusual field is dominated by NGC 6166; in the 14mm there’s a very very very faint trail extending to the SvsF that is a long shimmering smear of unresolved galaxies. NGC 6166 is, compared to the others, reasonably bright; it’s quite obvious in the field. It’s elongated SP-NF, with a very diffuse and not well-defined halo and a much brighter core that doesn’t appear to have a nucleus. The halo extends 1.0’ x 0.67’, and the core is half that size. P the galaxy by 5.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that is the N-most vertex of a small right triangle; due S of that star by 1’ is a 13th-magnitude star; P very very slightly S of that star by 0.75’ is another 13th-magnitude star. S very slightly P the galaxy by 5’ is another 11.5-magnitude star; the galaxy forms an almost-equilateral triangle with the two 11.5-magnitude stars. N of the galaxy by 14’ is a 9th-magnitude star. N very very slightly P the galaxy by 7’ is the F-most and fainter of a pair; these are separated by 0.5’ with the brighter P very slightly S of the fainter and are 13.5 and 14th magnitudes. P slightly N of the galaxy by 6’ is a 13.5-magnitude star that’s N of the brightest star in the right triangle by 2.67’. S very very slightly F the galaxy by 3.25’ is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s a 14th-magnitude star 2.75’ NF the galaxy [and a bright satellite crossing the field].

With the Delos, a couple of other galaxies become distinct; one of these, NGC 6166C, is NP NGC 6166 by 3.25’. This galaxy has a very diffuse halo that’s elongated S slightly P-N slightly F and spans 0.3’ x 0.25’, and its tiny, very slightly brighter core may house a very very faint stellar nucleus. N of this galaxy by a further 2’ is another, tinier galaxy (PGC 58232–how the hell did I see this??) which is more diffuse and has no real central concentration. With the Delos in, NGC 6166 seems as if its nucleus is offset to the F slightly, or there’s an embedded star on that side of the galaxy [there are actually multiple smaller galaxies embedded “within” the diameter of NGC 6166; it seems that I saw either PGC 58261 or PGC 58253, most likely the former]. F the 11.5-magnitude star that’s S very slightly P of 6166 by 2.5’ is a small round galaxy, PGC 58277, that’s heinously difficult to trace the size of because it’s just a vapor, visible mostly only in averted vision; the galaxy may have an incredibly faint nucleus that’s also an averted-only object. The galaxy spans 0.3’ x 0.25’ and is elongated SP-NF. There may actually be more galaxies trying to break out of the glow, a whole bunch of island universes trying to come out of an unyielding woodwork: SF 6166 by 11’ is another galaxy (PGC 58324), elongated NP-SF very slightly, 0.5’ x 0.3’. This one is very very diffuse–there’s not much there. SP 6166 by 15’ is another (relatively) fairly bright galaxy, NGC 6158, that’s considerably removed from the center of the cluster. This one is quite diffuse but has a pretty small, somewhat-brighter core within a 0.5’ halo. The galaxy has S of it by 5.5’ a 10th-magnitude star; S slightly F by 2’ is another 10th-magnitude star.

Next on my list was the remainder of the Vega Chain of galaxies I had started observing earlier.

12:27
NGC 6663 (Lyr): By far the most feeble of the Vega Chain so far, this little galaxy is in the field with a distractingly-bright 7.5-magnitude star that’s 7.5’ N somewhat P it. The galaxy is a very very diffuse spot, no more than 0.5’ across, with nothing by way of central brightening and a pretty poorly defined halo that’s almost not even there; if I didn’t know exactly where to look I wouldn’t have found it. SP the galaxy by 2.25’ is a pair extended NP-SF to each other, separated by 0.67’ and both of 14th magnitude; SP the N-most of those two stars by another 3.75’ is the brighter of another pair oriented P-F to each other, with the brighter 10th magnitude and the fainter a 12.5-magnitude star that’s 0.67’ F. NF the galaxy by 4’ is another double that’s also NP-SF to each other by 10”; these are both 13th magnitude, with the one to the SF just a bit brighter (13.2 and 13?). The 7.5-magnitude star is the brightest and S-most of a small isosceles triangle; NP it by 0.5’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; from the 7.5-magnitude star N very very slightly F by 0.75’ is a 10.5-magnitude star.

12:43
NGC 6685 (Lyr): Another in the Vega Chain, this one’s every bit as tough as 6663 in visibility (but still better than UGC 10738!) Patience is key with this tricky little galaxy, as it’s bigger than it first appears; it’s 0.5’ x 0.3’ elongated SP-N. The halo is pretty diffuse and reasonably well-defined. It has a tiny core that doesn’t come to a nucleus, although it almost seems like on SP end like there’s a threshold star [according to POSS, there isn’t]. SP the galaxy by 5.5’ is a 10th-magnitude star, and F very slightly N of it by 6.5’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; N slightly P the galaxy by 9’ is a 7.5-magnitude star. F slightly N of the galaxy, between the galaxy and the 9.5-magnitude star, is a little triangle of two 13th and one 14.5-magnitude star that’s no bigger than 0.75’ on the F side, with the faintest vertex closest to the galaxy (3.75’ F slightly N of the galaxy). 4.5’ S of the galaxy is another little triangle whose closest vertex is the N-most and brightest at 12.5 magnitude; the other two in the triangle are a 13th-magnitude star 1’ S of the first vertex and a 14th-magnitude star 0.75’ S slightly F the first vertex.

12:59
NGC 6695 (Lyr): These Lyra galaxies are not getting any easier–this one’s just as difficult as the previous two. This galaxy’s a little better because it’s longer and has more presence, despite being more diffuse than the others. It’s got some definition to the halo, at least, and a very slight bit of brightening along it; there’s nothing describable as a core or nucleus, however. The galaxy is a roughly N-S streak, 0.75’ x less than 0.25’. It lies S of a fairly prominent triangle of stars and forms a fourth vertex to the triangle; closest of these stars is the P-most vertex, which is NP the galaxy by 3.75’ and is 11th magnitude; NF that star by another 5’ is an 11th-magnitude star that’s 7’ due N of the galaxy; the third vertex in the triangle is the faintest at 12th magnitude and is N very slightly F the galaxy by 4’. Parallel to the P-most face of the triangle (which runs SP-NF) is the long side of a pattern of four stars, like a bent ‘y’; the four constituent stars in the ‘y’ are all 11.5/12th magnitudes; the ‘y’ spans 3.25’ end to end, with its middle star NP the galaxy by 9’. Running SF from the galaxy is a long chain of seven stars, all of which are 12th magnitude and fainter; this runs SF from the galaxy for 8’ and then hooks NF from there for another 11’; the second branch of this chain has the brighter stars, including a double which is F slightly S of the galaxy by 11’ and consists of a 10.5- and an 11.5-magnitude star, with the brighter NP the fainter by 0.3’. 

Although there were no doubt more galaxies in the Vega Chain within range of the 12.5″ Dob, these NGCs were the only ones I had included on my list. Perhaps at another date, I would be inclined to survey them all in one go, but for now I was pleased enough to have caught so many small galaxies within the confines of the Milky Way. That finished, I headed back over to the dim, forgotten constellation of Equuleus, the Little Horse, to pick up yet another of its unimpressive galaxies—having first observed NGC 7015 back at Giant City.

1:56
NGC 7046 (Equ): The second-brightest galaxy in the constellation? First? Equuleus isn’t a great hunting ground for scopes in this aperture. This pretty average galaxy is elongated very slightly P-F, 0.75’ x 0.67’. It’s quite diffuse but reasonably well defined, with a large, very slightly brighter core but no visible nucleus. A number of very faint stars lie within 3’ of the galaxy, making it somewhat hard to “read” any features on the galaxy itself. [There may be a suddenly better transparency, as the galaxy becomes somewhat easier to see.] To the S, N, and NF of the galaxy are 14.5/15th-magnitude stars within 3’ of the galaxy. SF the galaxy by 5.5’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; NF by 3.5’ is a 10th-magnitude star; a 12th-magnitude star lies NF that star by 2.5’; also SF by 2.5’ is a pair, with the brighter P very slightly S of the fainter by 0.67’; these are 13.5 and 14th magnitude.

2:08
NGC 6891 (Del): This little planetary nebula lies between the diamond of Delphinus and Altair. It’s very small–no more than 10” across–and very bright, with a well-defined circular disk. There’s no trace of annularity, and I’m not sure there’s a halo/fringe; the whole thing seems just an “out of focus star”. The central star is visible and fairly bright, maybe 13th magnitude. The nebula’s in a very busy field. Due N of the nebula by 8’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; another of 9.5 magnitude is F the nebula by 11’. P the nebula by 1’ is the brightest (12th magnitude) in a tiny grouping of stars P and very slightly N; these extend N-S and a bit to the NP of the nebula; there’s a whole bunch of stars in this. There’s another tiny knot of stars NF the nebula by 5’; 3.5’ due F the nebula is a 12th-magnitude star. Another somewhat nebulous looking group of faint stars lies P somewhat S of the nebula by 12’, and this links up with the group due P the nebula; there’s a long clumpy train of faint stars that runs along that train until the knot 12’ from the nebula. With the OIII filter, the nebula’s size and character don’t change much, but the filter makes the nebula almost glaringly bright in the much darker field. There may be a bit of outer envelope visible, but this isn’t seen with certainty.

Around this point, Alan headed off for home. Shortly after that, I could hear Dan snoring in his observing chair.

I turned my attention toward Pegasus, and an object I didn’t expect to see—another of the Deep Sky Forum’s Objects of the Week.

2:48
NGC 7468A/UGC 12342 (Peg): This is another insane “get!” This eye-bleedingly faint galaxy was the DSF Object of the Week almost a year ago (see here). Better known as VV 738, it’s a colliding/coalescing pair, throwing out long tidal streamers at the ends of its major axis. Visually, it’s a very difficult little spot, no more than 0.5’ x 0.25’, if that, elongated N-S. [In the 14mm at 112x, it’s difficult to judge the galaxy’s size, as it’s listed at magnitude 15.0.] There’s no detail visible or brightening at all, just a difficult little glow. The galaxy has F somewhat N of it by 3.5’ a 12th-magnitude star; continuing that direction for another 1.75’ is a pair that’s very close and very faint: these are both magnitude 14.5 and separated by 0.25’ NP-SF. From the galaxy 8’ S very slightly F, and making a mess of the field, is a 6th-magnitude star; S very very slightly F that star by 4.3’ is an 8.5-magnitude star that has a 13.5-magnitude star F slightly S of it by 0.5’. The galaxy is very very tough to hold steady; I’m actually surprised to have found it in a “mere” 12.5” scope. With the 10mm Delos, the galaxy is a little more obvious, just barely holdable in direct vision. [I’m trying to nudge the bright stars out of the field, which helps viewing the galaxy.] In the Delos there’s not much more in the way of detail but the extra magnification and the better quality of the eyepiece makes the galaxy just “brighter.” Every now and then, there’s a suggestion of very faint central brightening (no trace of the tidal tails, of course). I’m surprised to have found it at all, though, yet it’s unmistakably there!

Knowing that Dan was waiting for me to finish my observing before leaving, I decided on one final target—another of the flat galaxies that dotted the sky away from the Milky Way.

3:21
UGCs 542, 540 (Psc): This flat galaxy is tucked away by the Andromeda/Pisces border. It’s a lot easier than most of the flat galaxies I’ve done so far–a direct vision object with some detail. It’s pretty well defined, elongated 0.75’ x 0.1’ N slightly P-S slightly F, with a little tiny bit of central brightening. It looks like, just N of it, outside the N end, is a 15th-magnitude star. The galaxy lies roughly between two very bright stars: to the N very slightly F by 13.5’ is a 7th-magnitude star; S very slightly F by 12’ is an 7.5-magnitude star. Due F the galaxy by 2.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; P slightly S by 4’ is a 13th-magnitude star. The 7th-magnitude star to the N very slightly F is the NF vertex of a parallelogram that’s 4’ in major axis and 3’ in minor axis; S very slightly F of the 7th-magnitude star by 3.25’ is a 10th-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star 4’ due S of the 7th-magnitude star; P slightly S of the 7th-magnitude star by 1.75’ is a 12th-magnitude star. S of the galaxy, the 7.5-magnitude star has P it by 1.75’ a 10.5-magnitude star; P slightly N of that star by 7.5’ is an 8.5-magnitude star; 2.75’ S very slightly F that star is another galaxy (UGC 540) which is much more diffuse, with an embedded 15th-magnitude star on the F end. This galaxy is elongated roughly NP-SF, 0.75’ x 0.5’, maybe 0.3’. NP this smaller galaxy by 2.25’ is a 13th-magnitude star with a 14.5-magnitude star N very slightly P it by 0.5’. Back to 542: there’s a line of three stars S of the galaxy; the P-most of these is 11th magnitude and 4.75’ SP the galaxy; due F that star by 3’ is a 12-magnitude star; there’s a 13th-magnitude star F slightly N that star by 1’.

In many ways, this last night of the July/August run was the best: a galaxy cluster, two flat galaxies, a challenging distorted system, a number of typical faint galaxies, and a fine, small planetary nebula joined the list of objects I’ve observed. It had been a productive run, if lacking in targets that I “needed” to observe, and I drove home satisfied that I’d made the most of what the sky had provided, and elated at having such a pristine new site to observe them from.

 

 

Promissory Notes

I. The summer, regardless of the Hal Borland quote, turned out to be somewhat less of a season for observing than it had been in past years. As the spring had been a surprisingly-mixed bag, so too was its transition into the normally-dry and -clear months of Scorpius, Sagittarius, and Ophiuchus. Comments regarding the unusually wet, cloudy weeks of June and July came from all corners: what a weird summer we’re having.

May, too, had been unpredictable in its forecasts, but it ended on a positive note for astronomers in the Willamette Valley. Having had a productive week during the April/May Moon-dark phase, we were only able to return to action at month’s very end. Even our nights at this point of this particular summer were often spent observing through waves of unseasonal clouds, but there was nothing to do but press on, aware that we were fortunate to be able to expect clear nights all summer even if the sky didn’t always deliver. My younger self, observing from the Midwest, would’ve sacrificed a family member for the opportunities I had here in Oregon even in the worst cloudy seasons.

We had an invitation to try out an observing site on the south side of Mary’s Peak, courtesy of a friend of Jerry’s. This was certainly an intriguing opportunity—we had long been looking for sites that offered better accessibility than our usual haunts—but as the day wore on, it became apparent that the observing conditions weren’t going to be particularly accommodating at Mary’s Peak, at least not enough to warrant the extended drive. We settled for the spur road (Jerry, Dan B, and a relative newcomer to the group, Loren R, and I) on a rare night this cycle that improved as it went on, rather than clouding up. Loren had seen a bear cub near the end of the drive up to the junction: a reminder that—no matter how comfortable we were navigating the celestial reaches—we were still outsiders in the terrestrial wilderness.

This was my last cycle for extensive Herschel work to date. Although some of the objects I needed were circumpolar, the entirety of Ursa Major (my last galaxy-hunting ground) lay embedded in the seemingly-larger light dome from Eugene and Springfield, off to the northwest. In effect, none of the objects in the region would be anywhere near its best or most impressive. As I was trying to see the various galaxies under optimal conditions (as much as possible), it was actually better to wait until the following spring to observe them than it would be to take notes on them in their sky-diminished state. And with only a handful of Herschel objects remaining in the summer and fall skies, my next concentration of targets required waiting for Auriga to rise into view on the frosty evenings of fall.

For now, though, there were still plenty of galaxies remaining to be swept up. And the seeing and transparency were both exceptional this night, justifying our decision to pass on Mary’s Peak.

05/29-05/30/19
EAGLE’S RIDGE (spur road)
SUNSET: 8:46 PM
MOON: 26 days, rose at 3:53 AM (14% illuminated)
SEEING: 8+
TRANSPARENCY: 7+
SQM: 21.6
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to 42 F, no breeze, no dew; transparency cleared after midnight
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DB, LR 

All observations: 12.5″ f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:32
NGC 4939 (Vir): this galaxy lies just west of Spica. It’s a pretty large, diffuse, elongated galaxy with a N-S orientation, subtending 2.5’ x 1.75’. It has a very diffuse halo and a somewhat-elongated core containing a distinct substellar nucleus. The galaxy is reasonably bright, though not very well defined. It has, running SP-NF, a checkmark of stars by it: S very slightly P by 5.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; there’s another 12.5-magnitude star S very slightly F the galaxy by 6.5’; 7’ F very slightly S of the galaxy is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star F slightly N by 11’ that’s a double, with a 13th-magnitude secondary N by 0.3’. [A very slow-moving satellite crosses the field.]. NF the galaxy by 10’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; N very slightly P by 3.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star with a 14th-magnitude star 2.75’ P it. The brightest star in the field is 17’ NP the galaxy and is 10.5 magnitude; it has a 12th-magnitude star due P it by 0.75’.

10:48
NGCs 5077, 5076, 5079, 5070, 5088; PGC 46497 (Vir): My favorite thing in astronomy–a field loaded with galaxies!  There are at least six here. NGC 5077 is not the largest but is the brightest of group; it forms the N vertex of an isosceles triangle of galaxies that runs N-S, with the third galaxy SF 5077. NGC 5077 is  somewhat small and pretty well defined. It has a very bright small core and a distinct substellar nucleus, and roughly N-S elongation, maybe 1.0’ x 0.67’. The halo is not very diffuse. Due S by 5’ is another galaxy (5076) that’s considerably fainter and more diffuse, elongated slightly SP-NF, 1.0’ x 0.5’. This one is pretty diffuse and less defined than 5077 and has a stellar nucleus to it that’s not overly bright but does not require averted vision. From 5077 S slightly F by 3’ is another galaxy (5079), which is brighter and very slightly larger than the previous galaxy; this one is roundish, 0.75’ across, and very diffuse. It doesn’t have much central brightening and is not as well defined, making it somewhat difficult to hold steady sizewise. It may have on the very NF edge of its halo a threshold star that’s just barely notable, and there’s also a threshold star 1.75’ F slightly S of the galaxy. There are a lot of bright stars (of the 7-9th magnitude range) in the field. The brightest star here is due P 5077 by 8’ and is 7.5 magnitude; due N of 5077 by 11’ is an 8th-magnitude star, and between the two bright stars and very slightly N of that line is another galaxy (5070), almost exactly between the two stars, which are 13’ apart. This galaxy is really diffuse and ghostly and has central concentration that helps it stand out from the background; it’s 0.5’ round, with a distinct, almost bright stellar nucleus that jumps out, and also has on its S edge a threshold star. There’s also a 14th-magnitude star SP this galaxy by 1’; F slightly N the galaxy by 1.67’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. Back to the 8th-magnitude star due N of 5077: F that star by 5.75’ is a 9th-magnitude star that has [two satellites moving opposite directions, very bright!] S very slightly P it a little tiny galaxy (PGC 46497), just a fuzzy glow; this one is barely 0.25’ tops, and is pretty diffuse but has a substellar nucleus that’s the most-obvious aspect of the galaxy. From the 9th-magnitude star S slightly F by 8’ is a much larger diffuse galaxy (5088), which is oriented roughly N-S; this one is narrower than 5077 at 1.0’ x 0.4 and is the second-brightest of the galaxies in the field and is quite obvious when looking at 5077. It’s diffuse, pretty-well defined, and has central brightening along its length and an obvious substellar nucleus and a just-above-threshold star just N very very slightly F the nucleus by less than 0.25’; this galaxy is F slightly N of 5077 by 13’. P slightly N of the 8th-magnitude star N of 5077 by 7’ is a 9th-magnitude star. S of 5077 is a line of four stars that get fainter as they sweep F: S very slightly P 5077 by 13’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; 2.75’ F that star is a 10th-magnitude star; F slightly N that star by 5.75’ is an 11th-magnitude star; N very slightly F that star by 4.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; the 11.5-magnitude star is 10’ SF 5077.

11:13
NGC 4984 (Vir): An interesting little galaxy, low in the sky S of Spica. This one is 1.5’ across, and has a fairly diffuse but well-defined halo that comes very suddenly to a small, not very bright core, yet has a very bright almost-stellar nucleus. On the galaxy’s due P edge is a threshold star that’s really difficult to hold steady. There’s a 14th-magnitude star NP the galaxy by 1.75’ from nucleus. NP by 5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. N very very slightly F the galaxy by 4.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star, and there’s another 12th-magnitude star F very very slightly N of galaxy by 2.25’; from that star F slightly N by 0.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. N very very slightly P the galaxy by 11’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; NP that star by 3’ is an 8.5-magnitude star. S very very slightly F the galaxy by 14’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. SP the galaxy by 10’ is an 11th-magnitude star.

11:31
NGCs 5018, 5022 (Vir): Moving even further south now. NGC 5018 is a well-defined, non-diffuse glow, kind of a “tangible” looking galaxy. It’s elongated 1.5’ x 0.67’, P-F, with a nice bright core and a brightish stellar nucleus; the halo comes fairly quickly to the core–the brightness curve is pretty smooth and then bang! core and nucleus. 2’ N is a 14th-magnitude star. 6’ NP the galaxy is the brightest in the field, which is 9.5 magnitude. Further N, 6.5’ due N of the galaxy, is a 14th-magnitude star. F very slightly S of galaxy by 4.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s another 11th-magnitude star due F galaxy by 8’, and these two are separated by 4’; between those stars and slightly F is a very faint, very thin edge-on galaxy (5022): 2.5’ S of the last 11th-magnitude star. This galaxy is elongated S very slightly P-N very slightly F, 1.5’ x 0.25’ (maybe even thinner). It doesn’t have much brightening, appearing as just a ghostly streak. It’s very difficult and requires averted to hold, and yet it’s pretty-well defined–an excellent but faint edge-on.

12:04
NGCs 4151, 4156, 4145 (CVn): Farther afield, up in Canes Venatici for this next Herschel target. It’s a bugger to find, as 2 Canum wasn’t easily visible for starhopping. This is a decent galaxy, elongated 2.0’ x 0.75’ NP-SF. The halo is very diffuse, and quite difficult in direct vision. It isn’t well defined, and determining the full extent of the halo is not easy. Within the halo, it has a very bright round core  that’s 0.5’ across and a really bright, unmistakable substellar nucleus. The galaxy is bounded on the N and SP by 1.5’ each by (N) a 14th-magnitude star and (SP) a 14.5-magnitude star; due N of the star to the N by 1’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; from that 11.5-magnitude star F slightly N by 4’ is another galaxy (4156) that’s incredibly diffuse, just a fuzzy spot 0.75’ diameter, with maybe a very slight bit of P-F elongation; it has a faint stellar nucleus and a slight bit of core visible. This galaxy lies NF 4151 by 5.25’. Also P 4151 and very slightly N by 7.5’ is an 8th-magnitude star that’s the second-brightest in the field; the brightest is SF the galaxy by 18’ and is also 8th-magnitude (but very slightly brighter than previous); the first 8th-magnitude star has N very very slightly F it by 2.5’ an 11th-magnitude star. S slightly F the galaxy by 5.5’ is a 10th-magnitude star. N slightly P 4151 by 30’ is a much larger, much more diffuse galaxy (NGC 4145) with very little central brightening. It’s 3.0’ diameter and just “a big diffuse mess,” with a 14th-magnitude star on the S very very slightly P edge of its halo. This galaxy is very ill defined, with very slight central brightening that’s quite large but not much brighter than the halo; no nucleus is visible. It also has a 7th-magnitude star F it by 9’.

12:23
NGC 4359 (CVn): This is one of the more-difficult Herschels I’ve done–a really tough vaporous little streak. It’s very faint, with no central brightening at all, elongated P very slightly N-F very slightly S, 1.25’ x well-less than 0.25’… maybe 0.125’. Almost due S of it by 2.25’ is a 13th-magnitude star. P very very slightly N by 4.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s a 12.5 3.75’ due P the previous. N very slightly F the galaxy by 20’ is the brightest in the field, which is 8th magnitude, but otherwise it’s a pretty non-descript field.

12:35
NGC 4956 (CVn): This galaxy is also very small, but much brighter than 4359. It’s roundish, 0.5’ across, with a brighter core and definite stellar nucleus. The halo is pretty well defined. The galaxy forms a very obvious little isosceles triangle with a pair of stars, one due F and the other NF; the star to the F is 3.5’ F and 12.5 magnitude, and the other lies 3’ NF and is 13th magnitude. N slightly P by 7’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s an 11.5-magnitude star 13’ N very slightly F the galaxy. SP the galaxy by 13’ is the brightest in the field, which is 9th magnitude; there’s a 10th-magnitude star 3’ F very slightly N of that star, and this second star is S slightly P the galaxy by 10’.

12:48
NGCs 5056, 5057, 5065 (Com): 5056: Over into Coma for this galaxy, which is also not really impressive. It’s a very small, very very diffuse, poorly concentrated galaxy, but it also has the misfortune of being 3.5’ due N of an 8.5-magnitude star that completely distracts from it. The halo is 0.75’ x 0.3’, poorly defined, and elongated N-S; the galaxy has very weak central concentration, just the occasional flicker of an averted-only nucleus. Also distracting from it is a 14.5-magnitude star SF it by 1’. N slightly F the galaxy by 5.5’ is another very very small galaxy (5057) that’s a little more obvious due both to its distance from the 8.5-magnitude star and because it has a brighter core and an obvious but faint nucleus that help it stand out from the background. The halo is 0.3’ across; it’s not easy, though, due to its poor definition. F this second galaxy and very slightly N by 9’ is a 10th-magnitude star that has N of it by 1.5’ a 12th-magnitude star; due F those two stars (from the midpoint of those) by 5.25’ is another galaxy (5065) that’s also very diffuse but much larger (0.75’ across). This one looks to have a threshold star on the N edge of its halo, which is poorly defined. There’s not much central brightening here, either–there may be a very faint stellar nucleus, but the star on the halo’s edge distracts from the observation.

1:01
NGC 4800 (CVn): Much better than the last couple, this is a little elongated galaxy, N-S oriented, 1.0’ x 0.67’. It has a smaller, much brighter core and the halo comes gradually to it; the halo is well defined. I’m not sure there’s a nucleus, just a really bright core–maybe a tiny, very very faint stellar nucleus, but the core pretty much swamps it. Just outside the P edge of the halo, maybe 0.75’ from the nucleus, is a 13.5-magnitude star; there’s a 13th-magnitude star F the galaxy by 3.5’. S of the galaxy by 9’ is a 9.5-magnitude star. N of the galaxy by 15’ is a 7.5-magnitude star; there’s another of 7.5 magnitude P somewhat N of the galaxy by 16’; the 7.5-magnitude star to the N has a 10th-magnitude star P slightly N of it by 4’. There’s an 11.5-magnitude star F slightly S of the first 7.5-magnitude by 3.75’; F slightly S of that 11.5-magnitude star by 4.75’ is a 12th-magnitude star; this star is N slightly F the galaxy by 10’.

1:15
NGC 5103 (CVn): This little galaxy is the last on this Sky Atlas 2000.0 chart aside from the Whirlpool. It’s not a super easy target–very small, 0.5’ x 0.25’ if that large, and elongated N very slightly P-S very slightly F. Nonetheless, it’s reasonably bright and well defined, with a very tiny brighter core but no detectable nucleus. The galaxy is not served well by being 1.75’ S very slightly F an 8th-magnitude star; it’s also S very slightly P the S-most star in a N-S line of three; that star is NF galaxy by 0.75’ and is 13.5-magnitude; due N of it by 1.75’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; 0.75’ due N that star is an 11.5-magnitude star. SF the galaxy by 15’ is an 8.5-magnitude star. P slightly S of the galaxy by 21’ is an 8th-magnitude star, the second-brightest in the field.

1:26
NGC 5448
(UMa): This one is a little better than the majority tonight, lying  just F Alkaid in the Dipper’s handle. It’s a longish streak, a bit heavier on the P end, or lopsided, almost a miniature of the Whale but much smaller. The galaxy spans 1.75’ x 0.5’, oriented P very slightly N-F very slightly S. It’s pretty well defined, and has a lengthy central brightening and a very small faint stellar core. The halo is a little bit mottled (?) or irregularly bright. There’s possibly a faint star embedded in the P end between the nucleus and the edge [not shown in photos, so imagined]. The halo is definitely much fainter on the F side. 4.25’ due S of the galaxy is a 13th-magnitude star. S very slightly F by 11’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; there’s a 9.5-magnitude star 20’ NF the galaxy. Due P the galaxy by 6.5’ is a 14th-magnitude star. P very slightly N of the galaxy by 11’ is the brighter of a pair: this is 11.5 magnitude, and has due P it by 0.5’ a 13.5-magnitude star. SP the galaxy, and running SP from there, is a long string of ten stars that get mostly gradually brighter as they extend SP; that line is 20’ long and has at its NF end a pair of 13.5-magnitude stars; these are at the bottom of a right-angle “hook” that extends N very slightly and then SP and is parallelled by four stars at the SP end; there are two exact symmetrical little right triangles pointing SP, each 8’ along the hypotenuse, and there’s a gap of 4’ between the F star of the P triangle and the P-most star in the F triangle; the brightest star is at the P end of the P triangle and is 10.5 magnitude.

In all, the observing session itself only lasted for three hours, but it seemed much longer than that. In addition to the objects on which I took notes, I also had excellent views of Jupiter (which really showed off in the terrific seeing), a number of the fine globular clusters in the late spring/early summer sky (M9, M14, M5, M13, NGCs 6366, 6535, and 6435, etc.), the fine spiral galaxy NGC 6384 in Ophiuchus, the Emerald Nebula (a green/blue planetary also in Ophiuchus; this was the first time I’d actually seen it as green), The Leo Trio, M51 (which I still needed to take notes on, and which I’d regret not doing under the night’s conditions), and the supernova (2019ein) in NGC 5353.

But the real stunner of the evening was M11, the Wild Duck Cluster. I’d observed this cluster dozens of times, if not a hundred, and I’d never seen the myriad cluster stars as clear or with as much apparent depth as I did this night; every tiny pinpoint of light shone like a laser point perforating the inky blackness of the sky. There’s a reason we revisit objects time and time again: they can appear different every time they’re observed, even with the same gear at the same site. And this time, the cluster outshone every object I looked at, and every time I’d previously seen it.

For the second time in as many trips, Jerry barely missed hitting a skunk on the way down the mountain—as if we needed any other reasons to be fully alert on the winding half-hour drive back to the lowlands and the subsequent half-hour home.

II. Our next session out, two nights later, had far-inferior conditions, but was nonetheless  a worthy evening’s observing. We made our way to the closer Eureka Ridge, rather than make the longer trek to Eagle’s Rest. As the road to Eureka was much less treacherous and less demanding on the Caveman-Mobile, I appreciated the change of venue, even if the skies rarely equaled those at the various sites along Eagle’s Rest Road. We had a bigger group than usual (due in part to the choice of site), including another new member, Amy, who had come aboard attending Jerry and Dan B’s Solar Sunday events at Alton Baker Park.

With the light dome of Eugene off to the northeast, rather than the northwest, I had a little more leeway in working through the Ursa Major galaxies. I began in the Dipper’s bowl, where a surprising number of bright galaxies lurked unseen to the unaided eye.

05/31-06/01/19
EUREKA RIDGE
SUNSET: 8:47 PM
MOON: 28 days, rose at 4:47 AM (3% illuminated)
SEEING: 7-5 or even 4
TRANSPARENCY: 6
SQM: 21.3
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to upper 40s, some breeze, some dew; occasional clouds going through in the South; light domes to S very obvious
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DB, FS, AG, OG and Leticia, RA and his daughter, AB (Amy)

All observations: 12.5″ f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

11:00
NGC 3610 (UMa): starting off in the bowl of the Dipper, where there’s a ton of work to do. This one’s pretty bright and smallish, sometimes looking round and sometimes not; it’s hard to pick a direction of orientation if it isn’t round. It seems most often to be NP-SF elongated, perhaps 1.5’ x 1.0’. It has a very, very faint halo and a brighter core that’s not quite half the diameter of the galaxy; the halo comes gradually brighter to the core, which houses a very bright almost-stellar nucleus. It’s in an interesting field: NF the galaxy by 9’ is an 8th-magnitude star; S very slightly F that star by 13’ is another 8th-magnitude star. S of the galaxy and very slightly F by 2.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; P very very slightly N of the galaxy by 4.75’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. N very slightly P the galaxy by 13’ is the S-most star in an asterism that looks like the Teaspoon of Sagittarius; the spoon-end runs SP-NF and the handle runs N; there are about eight stars in this–the two on the opposite ends of “spoon portion” are brightest: the star on the F end is 9.5 magnitude and the one on the P end is 10.5 magnitude, and the end of the handle is 11th magnitude.  I wonder if this has a name; it looks like a legitimate cluster, but is not charted as such in any atlas I have.

11:14
NGCs 3613, 3619 (UMa): 3613: This galaxy is considerably bright, 1.75’ x 0.75’ and elongated P very very slightly N-F very very slightly S. It’s quite a lot like 3610 in structure; it has a diffuse, well defined halo, comes gradually to a bright core, and has a bright substellar nucleus (less stellar than 3610’s). N very slightly P the galaxy by 7’ is a 10th-magnitude star. NF the galaxy by 14’ is a 10th-magnitude star. NP by 6’ is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star P the galaxy by 18’. S very very slightly F the galaxy by 5.25’ is a 10th-magnitude star; S very slightly F the 10th-magnitude star by 11’ is another galaxy, slightly smaller and less concentrated (3619). This one is oriented P-F, spanning 1.25’ x 0.67’, and has much less central concentration–a core that’s only very slightly brighter than the halo, the halo very diffuse and not well defined, and an obvious but not overly-bright stellar nucleus. N slightly F 3619 by 6’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; a 10.5-magnitude star lies NF that star by 4.5’.

11:30
NGC 3642 (UMa): Just a round, relatively-diffuse glow, not overly well defined. The galaxy has some gradual central concentration, and does have a stellar nucleus, but there may also be a threshold star on the P edge [yes, according to the POSS plate]. There’s very gradual brightening of the halo to a not particularly large core. The whole galaxy is 2.75’ across [a bright satellite crosses through the field]. F the galaxy by 16’ is the brightest star in the field, at 9.5 magnitude. SF the galaxy by 7’ is another 11.5-magnitude star. NF the galaxy by 12’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; between the galaxy and that star is a little almost-right triangle; F somewhat N by 4.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s another of the same magnitude NP that one by 2.75’, and due S of the second by 0.75’ is a 14.5-magnitude star. P very slightly N of the galaxy by 6.75’ is a 12.5-magnitude star.


11:48
NGC 3669 (UMa): A very very difficult target, one of the most difficult Herschels I can recall. The sky is still decent, but the galaxy–probably a flat galaxy–is just a ghostly streak; 1.25 x less than 0.25’, elongated N slightly P-S slightly F. There’s no central brightening at all, although it almost seems as if the galaxy isn’t totally regular in illumination, as its brightness is uneven across the length of it. Averted vision really helps; it’s not a matter of definition (the halo is pretty well defined), the galaxy’s just very faint. P slightly N of the galaxy by 6.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; N very slightly P by 8’ (these distances are hard to judge because of the faintness of the galaxy) is another 11th-magnitude star; the two stars are separated N slightly F-S slightly P to each other by 4.5’. Due S of the galaxy by 4.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star, and there’s another 14th-magnitude star P very slightly S of that one by 1.25’. SF the galaxy by 8’ is a 12th-magnitude star with a 12.5-magnitude star 1’ due P it. The brightest star in the field is 18’ due F of the galaxy and is 9th magnitude. A 10th-magnitude star lies 13’ due P the galaxy. Bravo to whoever put this galaxy in the H lists as a challenge, as it certainly lives up (or down) to it!

At this point, our group shrank a bit, as Oggie and Leticia, and Amy, headed home.  Having arrived by sunset, we’d all put in three hours at Eureka, even if observing had needed to wait until darkness had truly fallen.

12:03
NGCs 3683, 3674
(UMa): Another highly-elongated galaxy, obviously an edge-on. This one subtends 1.25’ x 0.3’, roughly NP-SF. Its halo is fairly well-defined, and seems not to have much central brightening (there’s a really bright star SF that’s screwing up the observation); there doesn’t seem to have a nucleus visible. It does have an identifiable long core/brightening, as in most edge-ons, but it’s not much brighter than the halo. S very very slightly P the galaxy by 5.75’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; S very very slightly P that star by 3.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude; from the 12.5-magnitude star due P by 2.25’ is a 14th-magnitude star. From the galaxy S very very slightly F by 8’ is an 11th-magnitude star that has another 11th-magnitude star S very very slightly F it by 2.75’. The aforementioned really bright star is F somewhat S the galaxy by 19’ and is 6th magnitude and bright blue; this star is part of a large triangle with two other bright stars, a 7th-magnitude star F it by 8’ and a 9th-magnitude star NF it by 12’. Back to the galaxy: from 3683 NP by 8’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; N slightly F that star by 6’ is another galaxy (3674): this is smaller than 3683, maybe 0.67’ x 0.25’, elongated SP-NF. Its halo is better defined than 3683, and it has a faint stellar nucleus and a small somewhat-brighter core. 

Checking a POSS photograph later, I’m surprised to find that I missed observing NGC 3683A, which certainly seems as if it should have been visible. (While it’s true that any NGC object with a single-letter suffix is almost always more challenging than its un-suffixed counterpart, this one seemed well within reach.)

The next target was one of several Messier objects to appear in the Herschels as well—one of four in the vicinity of the Big Dipper to belong to both lists.

12:41
M 108 (UMa): On to one of the most underrated Messiers, which also happens to be a Herschel object as well (one of several in both lists, actually). M108 is a huge edge-on galaxy with a mottled irregularly-bright appearance and a star superimposed near the middle. The galaxy spans 6.5’ x 1.25’ and is elongated P very very slightly S-F very very slightly N. It’s much brighter and thicker on the F end than the P end, which is more diffuse and less defined. There’s no real central structure per se, no core, no nucleus, nothing specific to refer to. On the F end of the galaxy is a slightly-brighter patch about 0.25’ across that comes and goes with the seeing, just inside the F end of the galaxy. An 11th-magnitude star is embedded in the galaxy just on N edge, right in the middle of the galaxy, maybe 3.5’ from the F end; from that star, P very very slightly S, just outside the P end of the galaxy, is another 11th-magnitude star that’s 4.5’ from the first star. 3.5’ N very very slightly P the star at the middle of the galaxy is a 14th-magnitude star. Almost due P the galaxy, about 9’ P the star at the middle of the galaxy, is a 9th-magnitude star that’s the second-brightest in the field; 20’ SF the galaxy is the brightest in the field, which is 8.5 magnitude. N of the galaxy by 9’ from the star in the middle is the S-most of a pair; these are both 13.5 magnitude, separated N-S by 0.5’; this pair lies at the middle of a Pisces Austrinus-shaped asterism (or very rough ‘X’) which runs P-F for 15’, N of the galaxy.

1:02
NGCs 3998, 3990, 3982, 3972 (UMa): NGC 3998 is a decent-sized and fairly bright round galaxy, 1.5’ across. The outer halo is not overly-well defined and fairly diffuse; the halo comes quickly to a smallish brighter core and a distinctive almost-stellar nucleus. Due P the galaxy by 3’ is another galaxy (3990) which is much smaller, maybe 0.67’ x 0.3’, and elongated SP-NF, with a substellar nucleus but not much core visible, just a faint central brightening. Halfway between the two galaxies and  very slightly N is a threshold star. The second galaxy lies halfway between a 9.5-magnitude star and a 10.5-magnitude star; the 9.5 is due N of the galaxy by 4.5’ and the 10.5 is 5’ S very slightly F the galaxy; 3’ due P the 9.5-magnitude star is an 11th-magnitude star. From the 10.5-magnitude star SF by 19’ is another galaxy (3982): this one is much larger than the previous two. It’s round, 1.67’ across, with a large bright core that’s very gradually arrived at and pretty indistinct, but no nucleus. The halo is very diffuse and ill defined. SP this galaxy by 4’ is an 11.5-magnitude star with a 13th-magnitude star due F it by 1’. From this galaxy N slightly P by 13’ is another galaxy (3972), which also happens to be 20’ P slightly S of 3998. This one is elongated P slightly N-F slightly S, with almost no central brightening or nucleus, just a ghostly 1.25’ x 0.3’ glow; it’s a poorly-defined ghostly streak and considerably diffuse. SP this galaxy by 1.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star with another of 13th magnitude SP the first by 1.75’.

1:24
NGCs 3898, 3888 (UMa): This is a nice little galaxy in the eastern half of the Dipper’s Bowl. It’s elongated P very slightly N-F very slightly S, and covers 1.75’ x 1.0’. It has a small, bright, well-defined core and a bright stellar nucleus; the outer halo is diffuse but pretty well defined. 3’ F slightly N the galaxy is a 13.5-magnitude star; 3.5’ F very slightly N the galaxy is a 14th-magnitude star with a 14.5-magnitude star 0.25’ S very slightly F it. NF the galaxy by 9’ is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s another 13th-magnitude star SP the galaxy by 5.5’. P very slightly N of the galaxy by 10’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; there’s a 10th-magnitude star N very very slightly P that star by 3’, and 4’ N very very slightly F the 10th-magnitude star is a 9.5-magnitude star. From 3898 SP by 15’ is another galaxy (3888): this galaxy is smaller and fainter but still very obvious, elongated 1.25’ x 0.75’ P very very slightly N-F very very slightly S. Its halo is pretty diffuse and thin but it has a slightly more concentrated core that makes up most of the galaxy’s interior. P this galaxy by 1.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s a 14th-magnitude star NF it by 2’ and S very slightly P this galaxy by 21’ is a 5.5-magnitude star that’s slightly reddish. F 3898 is a scattering of 11.5/12th-magnitude stars in no particular shape; these cover a fair amount of the field, maybe 25’ N-S.

1:41
NGCs 4290, 4284 (UMa): The last one for the night, this fairly-faint galaxy is also a little more difficult than many of the others tonight. It lies within the same field as the double star M40 (aka Winnecke 4). The galaxy is merely a smallish, SP-NF glow, 1.5’ x 0.75’; it has a brightish core and a very difficult stellar nucleus, but the halo is pretty well defined. Due S of the galaxy by 9’ is a 10.5-magnitude star with another 10.5-magnitude N very slightly F by 2.75’; the second star is very slightly dimmer than the first; from the first 10.5-magnitude star S by 4.5’ is a 5.5-magnitude star (70 UMa) that owns the whole field. From the galaxy F by 11’ is the P-most component of M40, whose second component is F the first by 0.75’; these are both 9.5 magnitude, with the F one very slightly fainter. F very very slightly N of the galaxy by 9’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s a 13.5-magnitude star F very very slightly S of the galaxy by 4.5’. P the galaxy by 3.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star that has a 13th-magnitude star SP it by 1.67’, and P the fainter of the two by 0.75’ is an extremely-faint glow (4284) that can only be seen in averted vision 50% of the time (it doesn’t help that the seeing has gone to crap). This faint galaxy is very small, maybe 0.3’ across, with no central concentration visible, even in averted vision.


Throughout the evening, pitch-black clouds had traipsed through the southern half of the sky (ask me if I care about the pathetic fallacy right now), appearing only as transitory, flocculent black holes in the Milky Way. By this point, they had reached into the northern sky as well, occasionally crossing through the two Bears and making a mess of the observing. Alan had resigned himself to shooting around the cloud-strewn areas and using shorter exposures than he would’ve liked. But this late in the night, there was little point seeking out the increasingly-rare open spaces between the clouds; we conceded the night, hopeful for a return engagement the next evening.

III. A scant few hours later, I was again barreling up Eagle’s Rest Road in the van, having ascertained that Eagle’s Ridge would have the best conditions of any of our sites. Most of the regular observers in the group were either passing on the night, or were unsure if they could make it; I chose to use the spur road, as it offered more privacy from the local flavor should I have been the only one to make the trip.

After getting my setup routine underway, Frank and Steve F (from my OSP16 tribe) both pulled into the spur clearing. The Clear Sky Chart for the evening wasn’t particularly great, so I was grateful for a few fellow observers to bother joining me; given Loren’s recent bear sighting, and my vehicle’s history, I preferred not to observe alone if given the option.

Time was going to be short, as the CSC had only a few hours of clear skies indicated. To work, then:

06/01-06/02/19 
EAGLE’S RIDGE (spur road)
SUNSET: 8:48 PM
MOON: 28 days, set at 7:03 PM (3% illuminated)
SEEING: 6
TRANSPARENCY: 6
SQM: not checked
NELM: 6.2
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to low 50s, some breeze, no dew; Ursa Major heading into light glow/city lights
OTHERS PRESENT: FS, SF

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:58
NGCs 3756, 3738, 3733 (UMa): This is a very unconcentrated, very diffuse galaxy, although it’s certainly bright enough. It’s oriented N-S, spanning 2.5’ x 1.0’. The halo is not particularly well defined, especially on the P edge, and it has almost no central concentration at all–just one very fleeing glimmer in averted of a very faint stellar nucleus… imagined? Otherwise, it’s very evenly-illuminated glow, the poorly-defined N and S ends just disappearing into the sky background. From the center of the galaxy 3.75’ N very very slightly P is a 10.5-magnitude star; there’s a 14th-magnitude star 4.5’ SF the galaxy. On the N of the galaxy, starting at 9.5’ N of the galaxy, is a 10.5-magnitude star that’s the S end of an arc of five that proceeds N and NP from there; off the SP from the N-most star of that arc is another, brighter galaxy (3738) that’s much smaller, 17’ NsP of 3756. This one is elongated N very very slightly P-S very very slightly F, 1.25’ x 0.5’; it has a very slightly brighter core [a bright satellite cuts through the  field] but not much of a nucleus visible. The halo is pretty unconcentrated. 2.5’ F very slightly N of this galaxy is a 10.5-magnitude star (the N end of the arc); F slightly S that star by another 2’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; S slightly F that star by 3’ is a 13th-magnitude; 3.5’ S very very slightly F that star is the 10.5-magnitude star at the S end of the aforementioned arc; NF that star by 1’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. From 3738 N very slightly P by 17’ is a 6th-magnitude star; 4’ N of the 6th-magnitude star is the center of a very, very diffuse, large, poorly-defined galaxy (3733); I can see that something’s there but it’s extremely difficult to tell with the star there, and details are almost impossible to glean due to the star’s presence.

11:16
NGC 3631
(UMa): An interesting large round galaxy with a huge (3.25’ round), very faint, diffuse, and poorly-defined halo; it also has a very sudden, very small core and a bright stellar nucleus. The core is less than 0.3’ across. This must be a face-on spiral. NP and NF the galaxy, each by 3.5’, are faint stars; to the NP is a 13.5-magnitude star and to the NF is a 13th-magnitude star; the star to the NF has due N of it by 3.75’ a 12th-magnitude star that has S very slightly F it by 0.67’ a 13.5-magnitude star. Due F the galaxy by 12’ is an 11th-magnitude star. Due P the galaxy by 9’ is a 12th-magnitude star that’s the N-most in a long zigzag of stars that proceeds S very slightly P from there for three more stars and then bends SF and again proceeds S very slightly P; end-to-end this is about 12’.

As I’ve previously mentioned, I tend to put off taking notes on showpiece objects as long as possible—there’s simply too much detail to record, and I never feel as if I’ve done an adequate job getting it all. But sometimes it’s unavoidable to confront the prospect, and even though I had much better conditions a few nights before, the time for tackling THE spring showcase galaxy was definitely at hand.

Steve’s comment about my notetaking made my night.

11:28
M51 (CVn): This is The Big One, one I’ve been dreading taking notes on; surprisingly, it’s the satellite galaxy (NGC 5195) that’s the Herschel object here. There have been better sky conditions for this even this year, but we press onward as they’re good enough. The bridge between the two galaxies is readily visible, which is a pretty good indicator that conditions are adequate, even if the galaxy is in an unfavorable position vis the Eugene light dome to the northwest. NGC 5194, the Whirlpool proper, is at least 7’ diameter, with the arms extending to almost 11’ N-S. It’s very well defined, with a 0.75’ core that’s suddenly brighter than the halo, and it has a distinct substellar nucleus; embedded in the halo [Steve says I sound like a rabbinical speaker and it’s “kinda spooky”] to the SP about 1.3’ from the nucleus is the brightest and best-seen embedded star, which is 11th magnitude (?); F slightly S of the nucleus by 4’ (just outside the halo) is a 13.5-magnitude star. There’s a distinct bright patch in the NF quadrant of the halo on the outer edge; this patch is 1.5’ long and extends N to NF of the core. SP the core is a gap between where one arm wraps around the core and where the extended spiral arm drifts away to S and S very slightly F; there’s a thin gap there where the P arm can be seen separated from the core/halo; the 11th-magnitude star lies just along the N of that gap. There’s another gap F the core, inside the halo, halfway between the core and the edge of the halo; this runs SF-NF. Just S of the core, on the S edge and running roughly P-F, there seems to be another thin dark gap.

NGC 5195 is 4.5’ NvvsF 5194, nucleus to nucleus. 5195 has a very bright substellar nucleus, off-center to the SF, in a bright core whose edges are not at all distinct; this is inside a round halo about 3.5’ across; this halo fades away into the background without much definition [a satellite zips through galaxies SF-NP]. The arm of 5194 that stretches between the galaxies is not incredibly distinct at the moment but still visible; it comes from the F side of the halo of 5194 and loops around N slightly P from there to meet 5195 on its F side. The halo of 5195 is slightly compressed on its F side, with the nucleus skewed toward the F side as well. NP 5195 by 8’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; there’s a star of 13th magnitude P very slightly N of 5194 by 7’. SF the nucleus of 5194 by 16’ is a 12th-magnitude star that’s the SF-most in a line of four that runs NP-SF. (The sky is not cooperating well, at least in transparency; I should’ve taken notes on this the other night when conditions were better.) S very slightly F the core of 5194, just inside the edge of the halo, there’s another dark gap running P-F. 21’ F 5194 is a single, very slightly reddish 7.5-magnitude star. There’s a pair of 11th/11.5-magnitude stars, with the brighter SP the fainter by 0.75’; the brighter is 13’ F very very slightly S of the nucleus of 5194; these two make the narrow base of an isosceles triangle that points to the SF; from the brighter of the pair SF by 3.75’ is another 11th-magnitude star.


I’d noticed the observing conditions “softening” throughout the hours, and it was possible to watch them deteriorate even as I was finishing my notes on M51. There was still one more Messier/Herschel I could work on, one that might resist the failing conditions a little better than a smaller, fainter target. So I hopped over to it, even as Steve and Frank were beginning to stow their gear for the drive home.

11:55
M109
(UMa): an unusual spiral in that the halo extends PvsF-FvsN but the core is oriented roughly SP-NF, so the internal structure is a bit askew from the halo. The halo is extremely tenuous and indistinct in direct vision; in averted, it stretches out for 7’ (x 3.25’). The galaxy’s halo requires averted vision for a really good look. The core is elongated, 0.75’ x 0.5’ and has a distinct substellar nucleus. The galaxy is bounded by several stars; just outside the NF end is a 13th-magnitude star that’s 3.5’ F slightly N of the nucleus; SF that star by 1.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star, outside the F edge of the halo; due N of the nucleus by 0.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star embedded in the halo; P slightly N of the nucleus by 3’ is another 14th-magnitude on the halo’s edge. P very slightly S of the nucleus by 6’ is a 12th-magnitude star; SF that star by 2.75’ is a 9.5-magnitude star which is P somewhat S of the nucleus by 5’. Due N of the nucleus by 11’ is a 9th-magnitude star; due F the nucleus by 20’ is an 8.5-magnitude star, the brightest in the field.

It had been a short session, but still well worth it. (It almost always was worth it.) And even though I spent less time observing than I did driving to and from the site, I was satisfied with having accomplished some solid observations and finally putting M51 on my list of “observed objects”—despite the dozens of times I’d seen it before.

IV. The final night of our May/June run arrived sooner than we might’ve hoped. Usually, we could observe for three or four days after New Moon, at which point the Moon’s brightness and late setting meant that the Moon-dark cycle was pretty much over. This month, though, we had a single session after New Moon and then the clouds took over again.

We convened again at Eagle’s Ridge, on the spur road. Jerry brought the 20″ TriDob, and Kathy and Dan R came along for the festivities. Dan B brought his still-new 16″ ES Dob. We all noted the brighter skies to the northwest and wondered if the light pollution from Eugene had gotten worse, or if it was merely the effect of a number of trees along the ridge having been taken down.  Either way, the skies there had become gradually less conducive to deep-sky work since the first few times I had been at the site, three years prior.  (As I recall, my first foray onto the spur road was for the Herschel Sprint. It seems an eon ago.)

I spent much of the evening at the eyepiece of Dan’s and Jerry’s scopes, but made sure to hit several of the targets I needed along the Ursa Major-Boötes border while that area was still just above the Eugene/Springfield light dome. By the time we would return to the spur, those galaxies I was now observing would be too far into the light pollution for any kind of credible notetaking.  In the larger scopes, I observed Seyfert’s Sextet in Serpens, the Veil Nebula, Abell Galaxy Cluster 2151, NGC 4565, The Dumbbell Nebula, M80, the supernovas in NGC 5353 and NGC 5243, and, most wonderfully, the central star of the Ring Nebula. In my own scope, the highlight was finally taking notes on the sprawling face-on spiral galaxy M101, with its numerous attendant star clouds and nebulae. There were moments when the seeing and transparency were very good; the  sky cooperated, until it didn’t.

06/03-06/04/19 
EAGLE’S RIDGE (spur road)
SUNSET: 8:50 PM
MOON: 1 day old, set at 9:20 PM (0.3% illuminated)
SEEING: variable 6-7
TRANSPARENCY: 7+
SQM: 21.4
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to 39˚, some breeze, no dew; Ursa Major heading into light glow/city lights; clouds eventually wash out and consume sky
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, KO, DR, DB

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

11:11
NGC 5103 (CVn): This is one that I forgot before, although it’s easy to see why it’s forgotten: it’s not much to look at, just a tiny streak no more than 0.5’ x 0.25’ (probably smaller), and oriented N very slightly P-S very slightly F. It’s hard to measure the galaxy’s size because it’s 1.75’ SsF an 8th-magnitude star. Galaxy and star are the P edge of a ‘V’ shape, with the F edge consisting of three much fainter stars; NF the 8th-magnitude star by 2’ is a 12th-magnitude star; S of that star by 0.75’ is one of 13th magnitude; there’s a 13.5-magnitude star S of that
star by 1.75’ and this last star is NF the galaxy by 0.75’; the point of the ‘V’ would lie S very slightly F the galaxy if it had a point. The galaxy does have some central brightening: a very small core and a stellar nucleus that’s almost as bright as the 13.5-magnitude star. Glare from the 8th-magnitude star makes observation difficult. The galaxy is small and not at all easy; the core/nucleus combo makes up most of what’s immediately visible. F the galaxy and somewhat S [a bright satellite goes through the field] by 14’ is an 8.5-magnitude star; 22’ P very slightly S of the galaxy is another 8.5-magnitude star.

I had actually already taken notes on NGC 5103 back on 5/29-5/30, but had forgotten to remove it from my Sky Safari observing list and from my Sky Atlas 2000.0 chart.

But onto my next major target. Intriguingly, it wasn’t M101 itself that was on the Herschel lists, but some of its nebulous regions.

11:40
M101 (UMa): the other Big One (actually the Bigger One), including NGCs 5447, 5449, 5462, and 5461, all of them pretty easily visible, along with the heavy spiral arm running N that’s F the core of the galaxy. The overall glow of the galaxy spans 14’ between NGCs 5447 and 5462, roughly P-F, and then 12’ roughly N-S. The galaxy is not in a good spot in sky for observing; even though it’s probably 75˚ up, it’s still almost in the extensive Eugene light dome. The halo is diaphanous and very diffuse, and pretty poorly defined (most of the definition comes in patches along the arms, such as the NGC objects noted already). The galaxy has a 1.5’ core but not really a stellar nucleus per se. There are a number of embedded stars: 1.25’ N very very slightly F the core is a 13th-magnitude star; P somewhat N of the core by 3.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; S slightly P the core by 5’ is a 13th-magnitude star; S very slightly P the core by 7’ is a 12.5-magnitude star [actually NGC 5455]. SF the core by 4.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star that actually is in the middle of NGC 5461, which is a very small, faint patch about 0.3’ across; it has the associated star in the center. NF 5461 by 3.25’ is NGC 5462, which is much larger, 0.67’ x 0.25’, and elongated SP-NF; it’s brighter than the nebulosity of 5461 but more diffuse, with no visible concentration, although it seems to be composed of two connected segments NF-SP each other; these are almost due F the core of M101 by 6.25’. NGCs 5449 and 5447 are P and SP the core by 6.5’ and 8’ respectively; these are roughly N-S to each other, with 5447 to the S and 5449 to the N; N very slightly F 5447 is a 14th-magnitude star which lies just outside the NF edge of that spot of nebulosity.  5449 is extremely diffuse, 0.3 across; 5447 is much more concentrated, oriented NP-SF and spanning 0.3’ x 0.25’. F very slightly N of the core by 3.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star; from that star and running N for 4.25’ is the heavy arm of M101, which is 4.25’ x 0.67’, just a long straight “bar” that runs almost due N from the star and hooks slightly P. This is not remotely the best view of the galaxy that I’ve had, but it’s still remarkable. S very very slightly P the core is more concentration in the glow, about 4’ from the core, but this is indeterminate in size. The majority of the galaxy’s glow is in a roughly round, maybe 12’ disk, with other faint wisps signifying the spiral arms on the periphery. Averted vision is a huge help in tracing the faintest outlines of the spiral arms.


12:17
NGCs 5473, 5485, 5486 (UMa, Boö): After M101 and its attendant nebulae and star clouds, these are a little more mundane. NGC 5473 is a very small, elliptical-looking galaxy, round, and about 1.25’ across. It has a diffuse, pretty well defined halo, a very small core that’s fairly suddenly arrived at, and a stellar nucleus. The galaxy is at the N end of a zigzag that contains three stars; the brightest of these is the S-most and is 9.5 magnitude; S very very slightly F the galaxy by 1.67’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; SF that star by 2.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; 1.67’ due S of that star is the 9.5-magnitude star. F somewhat N of the galaxy by 2.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; also F somewhat N of the galaxy by 7’ is a 10th-magnitude star. P somewhat S of the galaxy by 9’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. NF the galaxy by 13’ is a 9.5-magnitude star. F the galaxy and slightly N by 23’ is another galaxy (5485): this one is larger and more diffuse than 5473. It’s elongated N-S, 1.25’ x 0.75’, and has a larger brightish core that’s suddenly come to, and a dim stellar nucleus that’s not easy to pick out of the core. SF this galaxy by 2’ is a 14th-magnitude star. S of the galaxy by 8’ is the more N of a pair of 11th-magnitude stars separated SP-NF by 1’. NF the galaxy by 9’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. N very slightly F 5485 by 7’ is another galaxy (5486) which is much much fainter than the previous ones. It’s elongated P-F very slightly, and so diffuse it’s hard to determine its size. The halo is poorly defined, and has a very very slightly brighter core and no nucleus; it’s still fairly obvious despite this. In averted vision, the core becomes slightly more visible.

12:42
NGC 5474
(UMa): This is, in photographs, a very peculiar galaxy; in the eyepiece, it’s still very much so. The halo is roundish and considerably large, 3.0’ across. The bright, obvious core is well shunted to the N end; the core is 0.5’ round, with no nucleus visible. There’s no buildup in brightness to the core; the halo is  just evenly dim and then the core is suddenly bright. NF the core on the outside edge of the galaxy is a 14.5-magnitude star. SF the core, very slightly, is another embedded threshold star. NP the galaxy by 4.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; NP the core by 9’ is the S of a pair of 12th-magnitude stars separated S very slightly P-N very slightly F by 1’; P slightly N of the S of that pair by 2.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; those three stars form an isosceles triangle pointing P very slightly N. SP the galaxy, 12’ from the core, is a 10.5-magnitude star. SF the galaxy by 10’ is a double/pair, with the brighter star P the fainter by 0.25’; these are 11.5 and 11.7 magnitudes. NF the galaxy by 18’ is the brightest star in the field, which is 9th magnitude and has a 12.5-magnitude star F it by 1.3’.

Throughout the evening, clouds had been sweeping through; these started as thin, cirrus-like strands that appeared as “flickers” in the seeing and transparency as one stared into the eyepiece. They gradually become denser and more opaque, and were now visible to the naked eye. Before long, the sky was more clouds than stars, and the moment was approaching when further observing became an impossibility. One last eyepiece field, then, before abandoning the spring galaxies for the season.

1:16
NGCs 5480, 5481 (UMa, Boö): this Herschel galaxy lies near M101 and has a very obvious companion galaxy (5481) immediately F it. NGC 5480 is elongated due N-S, spanning 1.25’ x 0.75’. It looks somewhat irregular in shape, like there’s a little “hook” on the SP corner that arches S and then proceeds F; there may also be one to the N, NF, or maybe a threshold star just outside of the halo there. The galaxy has a pretty large core compared to its halo, but neither is well defined or delineated. I’m not catching a nucleus, although the second galaxy has a very obvious stellar nucleus. The second galaxy (NGC 5481) is due F by 3’ and is and elongated P-F, with a diffuse, poorly-defined halo, a fairly weak core, and a bright substellar nucleus; the galaxy is definitely nucleus-dominant. This galaxy is 1.25’ x 1.0’ [a really
slow satellite is tracking P-F through the field]. Due N of 5481 by 5.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; due S of 5480 by 13’ is an 11th-magnitude star. The galaxies have suddenly disappeared as I’m taking notes [clouds are coming through!], then reappear. N very very slightly P 5480 by 16’ is a 10.5-magnitude star.

And with that, the majority of my Herschel hunting was over until Auriga arrived in the northeast during the late summer/early fall months. I had only NGC 6543 (the Cat’s Eye Nebula), NGC 752 in Andromeda, and a couple of targets that were somehow left off my Herschel lists remaining until then. There were, of course, countless objects to observe and ponder, and I would have to spend some time sifting through books and webpages to come up with an agenda that would keep me busy for the summer.

And when we next convene for “serious” observing, it would be at a new site that would make our current observing sites essentially obsolete.

 

 

Purposefully Adrift

The last observing session in March was the end of our possibilities for that particular dark phase of the Moon—early April, and mid-April, too, were wiped out by the torrential rains we seemed to only get in the winter. The rain washed away any remaining snow from February’s epic storm (patches of which still remained in shaded spots around the Eugene area for several weeks afterward), and seemed poised to wash the Willamette Valley clean of human habitation as well.

I didn’t have high expectations for the April/May moon-dark phase, given how odd the year’s weather patterns had been—virtually the opposite of those from our previous years here, and even strange as I write this several months post facto. But the weather once again surprised me, and the April/May cycle proved the best of the year, as well as the most productive Herschel-wise.  In transcribing my notes at several months’ remove, I’m puzzled at the number of clear nights we actually got then; it didn’t feel like a whole dark cycle, yet according to my notes we got seven sessions out of the week around May’s New Moon.

And it turned out to be a terrifically-productive week, as well—sixty or so galaxies, a couple of globular clusters (including the last two that I needed to have taken notes on to have gotten all of the Messier/NGC globulars visible from my latitude), and a couple of bright spring planetary nebulae I’d held off on. I’d have to sacrifice the remaining Auriga/Gemini objects, the remaining Canis Major/Monoceros/Puppis clusters and nebulae, and many of the Ursa Major galaxies in order to get back on track, though I’d already suspected that I wasn’t going to be finishing the Herschel 400 and H-II lists this calendar year anyway. As a bonus, getting through the Leos, Virgo, Coma Berenices, and Canes Venatici would also allow me the “luxury” of doing more casual observing throughout the summer, using scopes aside from the workhorse Bob the Dob… which would also allow me to send Bob’s mirror out for recoating, a much-overdue update for the 20-year-old mirror.

I. I stopped at the Dairy Queen on 58S to look at the sky, so that I could let the other astro-travelers in the group know: was the sky as bad there as it looked from Eugene? The answer was a noncommittal “sorta.” I actually considered turning around and coming home; surely the sky wasn’t likely to be any better at Eagle’s Ridge, and I hated the idea of putting the Caveman-Mobile through the tortuous drive to the ridgetop if the sky wasn’t going to cooperate. But even the possibility of clear skies after a month of rain was enough to tip my hand toward the side of optimism.

So we made our first pilgrimage out to Eagle’s Ridge on the evening of April 26th, intending to put the somewhat-mediocre sky to good use. Instead, the long hiatus from observing, and the presence of Jerry’s 20″ TriDob and Dan B’s new 16″ Explore Dob (which saw first light that evening!), meant that I wandered from scope to scope the first night, taking advantage of the other scopes’ aperture to observe some of the spring showpieces in greater detail than I could manage with the 12.5″. Je ne regrette rien….

Among the highlights this first night were several Hickson groups—44, 55, 56, 68, and 61—seen through Jerry’s scope; I also looked at 44 and 68 in Bob the Dob, Frank’s binoscope, and Dan’s new Dob. M51 and M101 looked as good as I’d ever seen them in my scope. The Leo Trio was a knockout, too, and even though NGC 3628 was on my list of targets, I didn’t take notes on it there and then. The Cocoon Galaxy was a treat, as were the big, bright early globulars M5 and M13, the latter paired with an unusually-obvious NGC 6207. Hoag’s Object, the well-known (but rarely observed) ring galaxy in Serpens, wasn’t overly difficult in the 20″, although the outer ring was certainly exceedingly difficult (the core was not). I spent a little bit of time with the gorgeous double star Alpha Herculis as well.

But the real showpiece object of the night was the Ring Nebula, viewed at 1000x in Jerry’s scope. I was stunned to see not only the tiny galaxy IC 1296, which lurks by the Ring, but also the nebula’s central star—this was the first time I’d spotted the elusive object in 30+ years of observing. The central star isn’t impressive by any stretch—it’s just a faint star, after all—but its difficulty in being spotted among the nebula’s glow makes it a much-sought-after target for amateur astronomers as they work their way up the ladder of experience.

During my itinerant wandering among telescopes, I also made myself take notes on at least one Herschel object… and one was all I got.

04/26/19
EAGLE’S RIDGE (junction)
MOON: 23 days (rose at 3:11 AM; 43% illuminated)
SEEING: 7
TRANSPARENCY: 5, gradually a 7 (11 PM onward to 2:30 when we left)
SQM: 21.45
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: not great, moderate dew; temps in low 50s/upper 40s
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, LR and Donna, RA, DB, DR, FS, AG 

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:11
NGC 3184 (UMa): A large galaxy in the foot of Ursa Major, this one is very diffuse, round, an apparently face-on galaxy with an 11.5-mag star just on the N edge. The galaxy is quite round, 4’ across. It’s diffuse, but also more concentrated along the N-S axis– maybe barred? [It’s not barred, but the spiral arm concentration is strongest on the N-S axis.] The galaxy has a brighter but very diffuse core 0.67’ across, and the occasional glimmer of a nucleus; the nucleus is not an easy hold, and is much more visible in averted, which also greatly helps the overall observation of this galaxy. (The eyepiece might be dirty, which isn’t helping.) The galaxy is not particularly well-defined, especially along the F edge; definition is better on the P edge. 6’ F slightly S from the center of the galaxy is a 13.5-magnitude star. P slightly S by 7’ is a 14th-magnitude star. The brightest in the field is NP the galaxy by 11.5’ and is 6.5 magnitude; 3.75’ N very slightly F that star is an unequal pair with the brighter SF the fainter by 10”; these are 13th and 13.5 magnitudes. 3.75’ S very slightly F the 6.5-magnitude star is an 11.5-magnitude star. P somewhat S of the galaxy by 20’, just on the edge of the field, is a 7.5-magnitude star; this one is flanked to the N and F very very slightly N by bright stars: to the N by 1.75’ is a 9th-magnitude star; to the F very very slightly N by 2.5’ is the brighter of a pair: a 10th-magnitude star with a 14.5-magnitude star P very slightly S by 10”. There’s a wedge-shaped pattern of stars on the P and N edges of the field, and pointing to the SF; this is just outside the field; all the stars in this are between 9th and 12th magnitudes, with the two arms of the wedge separated by 14’ at its tips.

II. Two nights later, the forecast again offered promise for the collecting of ancient photons.  This time, though, it was Eureka Ridge that showed the greatest potential, so we opted for the shorter, smoother drive and the slightly-less-dark skies (and ended up with a night only 0.05 less dark on the SQM). Our party was smaller this time; only Jerry and Jeff L were able to join me at the site. This night, though, I stuck to my Herschel agenda, and was able to make significant headway—especially in Leo, where I had a lot of catching up to do.

The howling of the wind on my recordings actually made it hard to hear my notes on occasion. It would get even worse as the night went on; fortunately, the treeline at Eureka, which also blocks much of the light pollution from Eugene, serves as an effective windbreak.

04/28/19
EUREKA RIDGE
MOON: 25 days (rose at 4:12 AM; 25% illuminated)
SEEING: 6
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.4
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: howling winds beyond treeline, temps mild (low 50s), no dew
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, JL 

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

9:56
NGC 2419 (Lyn): This is the penultimate NGC/M globular I have to take notes on, at least from those visible from the Northern Hemisphere. It’s reasonably bright, but definitely beyond resolvability this night. (I had tried back in March, but the skies at Dexter weren’t conducive to taking notes on it.) It has the barest hint of granularity across the core, but no resolution. The cluster is about 1.5’ across, with a brighter central region that’s 0.75’ across;  no real outliers are visible. I’d say it’s a CC VI, based on its overall brightness contour. The cluster is in a very busy field. Due P by 1.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; two other 13.5/14th-magnitude stars lie S of the cluster and two more N very slightly P and NF, so that the cluster lies within a distended pentagon of 13.5/14th-magnitude stars. Due P by 4’ is one of field’s brightest at 7th magnitude; 4.5’ P that star is a double with the brighter star of 8.5 magnitude and the fainter N very very slightly P that by 0.5’; the fainter of the pair being 10th magnitude; from the primary of this double P slightly N by 4.5’ is a 9th-magnitude star. N of the cluster by 6.5’ is a pattern slightly like the keel of a boat, comprised of seven stars of 12th and 13th magnitudes. 14’ N very slightly F the cluster is a 10.5-magnitude star. F very slightly S of the cluster by 16’ is an 8.5-magnitude star. From the cluster 16’ S very slightly P is the brightest in a very distinctive but somewhat shapeless asterism; that star is 9.5 magnitude and forms the S-most vertex of a flat kite-shaped asterism whose tail stretches to the F side; the kite is between two lines of stars, with the line to the S composed of two 11.5-magnitude stars and the line to the N made of four stars in a wedge shape; these stars are all 11.5 and 12th magnitudes and the asterism is 14’ N-S and 3’ wide at its widest (on the N end) and tapering S-ward; the stars to the S are 1.25’ apart.

10:12
NGC 3344 (LMi): I tried to take notes on this the other night and gave up for some reason; it’s a bright, good-sized face-on spiral that’s a favorite of mine, and I’ve observed it enough times not to be fooled by the stars within its disk masquerading as supernovas.  The halo is 4.25’ across, very diffuse and poorly defined; averted vision brings more definition to it. The galaxy has a very small brightish core; I’m not sure about seeing a nucleus. Two embedded stars on the galaxy’s F side distract from the observation. 1.5’ from the core, on the F edge, is a 10.5-magnitude star, and 1’ F the core is a 12th-magnitude star; every now and then a trace of a third star is visible in that area, but I can’t hold it (or the scope, due to the wind) steady. SP the galaxy, 6’ from the core, is a 10th-magnitude star. NP the galaxy by 16’ is the N-most vertex of a small, almost-equilateral triangle; that vertex is 9.5 magnitude; S very very slightly F that star by 1.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star; S very slightly P the first star by 1.67’ is a 12th-magnitude star; these last two vertices are 1.25’ apart. NF the galaxy is a large triangle of 9.5/10th-magnitude stars which has an arc of three fainter (12th and 13th magnitude) stars in its P-most edge, running toward the center of the triangle. There are a number of faint stars due S and SF the galaxy, between 5’ and 10’ SF the galaxy; NP the galaxy by 7’ from the core is the more S of a pair of 14th-magnitude stars separated N very slightly P-S very slightly F by 0.67’.

10:31
NGCs 3507, 3501 (Leo): 3507: This galaxy is a small, 1.5’ (just under) round, hazy glow. The halo is pretty well defined; the galaxy has a bright distinct substellar nucleus that contrasts to a distractingly-bright (10.5 magnitude) star immediately following the nucleus, and a small but obvious core. The 10.5-magnitude star really wreaks havoc observing the galaxy. An 11th-magnitude star lies N very very slightly F the galaxy by 5.5’; 3’ due S of the galaxy (and the star on the edge of the galaxy) is a 10th-magnitude star; P slightly S from that star by 14’ is the brightest star in the field at 9th magnitude; 3501 lurks between and S of the last two stars; from the star on the F edge of 3507 S slightly P by 12’ is 3501: a ghostly edge-on with no central brightening, no core or nucleus. This galaxy is 2.25’ long x 0.25’–a flat galaxy? It seems that sometimes there’s the faintest trace of a nucleus. The galaxy is elongated S very slightly P-N very slightly F.

By this point, we were incredibly grateful for the treeline; the wind was absolutely roaring on the other side of the ridge.

10:42
NGC 3599 (Leo): This begins the assault on Leo’s tail, which I’ve been waiting to get to for some time. It’s a very non-descript small glow, pretty round, 1.25’ across. The halo is well defined, although not at all bright; this is not at all an object that’d be well-noticed in the field at a glance. There’s a substellar nucleus without much visible core.  It’s in an equally non-descript field, with the next three much larger and brighter galaxies just off to the F side. This one has S slightly P it by 9.5’ a 12th-magnitude star. N slightly F the galaxy by 9.5’ is a 12-magnitude star which has due N of it by 3.25’ an 11.5-magnitude star, and also has F very very slightly N by 2’ a 14th-magnitude star; these make a triangle at the F end of an arc that stretches P; the N-most of those three stars is 17’ F the P end of the arc/bendy criss-cross with the triangle at the F end. The brightest star in the field (10.3 magnitude) is S somewhat F the galaxy by 19’. F the galaxy by 21’ is the largest and brightest of the F trio in a N-S line:

10:51
NGCs 3608, 3607, 3605; UGC 6296 (Leo): A very impressive trio!–3608 is the second-brightest/second-largest of the trio. The galaxy is roundish, 1.0’ diameter, and very well defined. It has a smallish, very bright, blazing core that it comes suddenly bright to, and a bright stellar nucleus. It’s bracketed to the NP and NF by a pair of 12.5-magnitude stars; the one to the NF is 2’ from the nucleus, while the one to the NP is 1.3’ from the nucleus and is the F-most vertex and brightest of a small triangle which includes a 14th-magnitude due P the 12.5-magnitude star by 1’; from the 12.5-magnitude vertex N slightly P by 1.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. 6’ S of 3608 is 3607: the largest and brightest of the trio. This galaxy is elongated P-F, 1.5’ x 1.0’, with a very bright core and very bright stellar nucleus; this one really jumps out, and it’s very well defined. It’s also N very slightly F 3605 by 2.75’. 3605: the smallest and faintest of the trio, it’s elongated slightly SP-NF, 0.5’ x 0.3’. It’s not as well defined as the others, and though it’s fainter it isn’t difficult at all. The galaxy has a somewhat brighter, very small core that’s overshadowed by an obvious substellar nucleus. NP it by 2.25’ is a 13-magnitude star. Back to 3607: F very very slightly S of the nucleus of 3607 by 4.75’ is the NF (12th magnitude) vertex of a Hercules-keystone asterism; from that star S by 1.5’ is the second-brightest of these (at 12.2 magnitude); from this star P by 0.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; from that 13.5-magnitude 1.5’ N very slightly P is a 13th-magnitude star. The second-brightest (the 12.2-magnitude star) in the keystone is a double, with the fainter N very very slightly F the brighter; the fainter is 13th magnitude and N of the primary by 15”. From 3607 S by 16’ is a 12.5-magnitude star that has SP it another galaxy (UGC 6296): an elongated/inclined spiral? It’s very small, 0.5’ x 0.125’, elongated NP-SF (?). There’s not much central brightening at all. This galaxy is very difficult, pretty much on edge of direct vision, and poorly defined.

11:16
NGC 3626 (Leo): An inclined spiral? The galaxy has a very bright substellar nucleus and an only somewhat brighter core. It’s elongated N-S, 1.25’ x 0.75’. It has a stunning bright nucleus, and the halo is pretty well defined. There are a number of interesting star patterns/triangles in the field. S very very slightly P the galaxy is the short side of an isosceles triangle; the brighter vertex is the more S of the two by 1.25’, S very very slightly F the other; these are 11.5 and 13th magnitudes; the brighter is to the S, 9’ S very very slightly P the galaxy; the third vertex is 4’ P very slightly N from the brighter of the two, and is 12.5 magnitude. The brightest in the field is S somewhat P the galaxy by 18’ and is the S end of an arc of three; that star is 9.5 magnitude; the arc includes two 12th-magnitude stars: a 12th-magnitude star that’s 1.75’ N very slightly F the 9.5-magnitude star and a 12.5-magnitude star that’s NF that second star (the 12th-magnitude star) in the arc by 1.25’. Almost due N of the galaxy by 13’ is another bright star, a 10.5-magnitude star which is at the S end of a much larger arc that also includes a 12.5-magnitude star NF it by 5.5’, and from the 12th-magnitude star NF by 4.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star.

11:27
NGC 3659 (Leo): An interesting little galaxy, still in the tail of Leo. It looks as if it has a double core (?), almost peanut shaped, like a smaller fainter M76. In moments where the seeing is steady that irregular shape is very apparent. The galaxy is elongated P very slightly S-F very slightly N, 1.25’ x 0.67’, and the F very slightly N end is “heavier” than the P end. It appears to have (in direct vision) a glimmer of a nucleus. To the P slightly S of the double core the halo is smeared out. The halo is pretty well defined and not particularly bright. P very slightly S (along the major axis of the galaxy) by 11’ from the nucleus is an 11th-magnitude star; an 11.5-magnitude star is on the same axis, 4.5’ P very slightly S of the first star. The brightest star in the field is S very very slightly F the galaxy by 12’; that star is 10.5 magnitude and is the S-most vertex of a diamond elongated SP-NF, with a 5.5’ major axis and a 2.75’ minor axis; at the opposite end of the major axis (the NF vertex) is a 13th-magnitude star; on the P end of the minor axis, 4’ N very very slightly F the 10.5-magnitude star is an 11.5-magnitude star; the fourth vertex, on the F end of the minor axis, is double: two 14th-magnitude stars separated N-S by 15”.

11:47
NGCs 3686, 3684, 3681, 3691 (Leo): This may be the final quartet in the Lion’s tail. 3686/84/81 form a SP-NF line; 3686 is the N-most and 3681 the S-most with 3684 in the due middle. 3686: this is the brightest and largest in the group, a big diffuse galaxy, with only a very slight, very gradual bit of central concentration. The galaxy is very slightly elongated N-S, 2.3’ x 1.75’. It’s considerably diffuse, its central brightening just barely brighter than the poorly-defined halo but fairly large; the galaxy does, in moments, have a faint substellar nucleus–maybe this is actually a really tiny core? I’m almost positive this is a face-on spiral.  The halo is irregularly bright/mottled. Just outside the S edge of the halo is a 14th-magnitude star. On the F edge of the halo seems to be some vague darkness inside the edge, like a gap between arms, but it’s really hard to tell at this magnification. (When this Herschel project is over, I’m going to have to revisit a lot of these objects with much greater magnification.) N of the galaxy’s center by 2.67’ is an 11th-magnitude star; N very slightly F the galaxy by 9’ is a 10th-magnitude star. S slightly P 3686 by 14’ is 3684: this galaxy is 1.25’ x 0.75’, elongated NP-SF. Its halo is pretty well defined but with diffuse outer edges. The galaxy has obvious central brightening, with a core that’s pretty considerably brighter than the halo and an occasional flicker of a nucleus. N slightly F the nucleus by 3’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. F galaxy by 8’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; F that star by 7’ is an 11th-magnitude star which has a 12.5-magnitude star F slightly N of it by 4’; from the 11th-magnitude star due S by 6.5’ is NGC 3691, and from 3684 S slightly P by 14’ is 3681: a round, ill-defined 1.3’ glow with a brighter core that’s slightly offset to the S; the core is considerably brighter than the halo, which brightens gradually to it. The galaxy has a substellar nucleus, and for just a moment I have a fleeting impression of possible spiral structure in the galaxy… or a trick of the light? NF the galaxy is a pair of 12.5-magnitude stars separated SP-NF by 1.75’; these form the narrow base of an isosceles triangle; the closest to galaxy is 3’; from that vertex N by 4.25’ is the tip of the triangle, which is 11th magnitude; from the more S vertex (the closest to the galaxy) P very very slightly S by 0.67’ is a 14th-magnitude star (so there are three stars on the base of the triangle). Back to 3684: F very slightly S by 17’ is 3691: this galaxy is much more diffuse than the previous three, with very weak central concentration or a very weak core. The galaxy is roundish at first, with maybe some SP-NF elongation that becomes visible with effort. It has a very weak core, but I’m not picking up a nucleus. The 0.67’ x 0.5’ halo is poorly defined. SP the galaxy by 4.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star.

Jeff left at this point, having worked on his own Herschel program throughout the evening. I plowed on ahead, determined to get through as much of Leo as possible.

12:17
NGCs 3646, 3649 (Leo): My notes say “mysterious?” This galaxy lies just outside the triangle of Leo’s hindquarters. It’s a large, elongated galaxy, 2.0’ x 1.3’, and has a brighter core that’s also slightly elongated. There’s a definite substellar nucleus in averted vision, and a couple of faint stars to the NP. The galaxy is irregularly-illuminated, football-shaped, elongated SP-NF. 19’ NF is the brightest star in the field, which is 11.5 magnitude and is the F-most and RA vertex of a right triangle; NF that star by 4.5’ is another 11.5-magnitude star; from the RA vertex N slightly P by 6’ is an 12.5-magnitude star. SP the galaxy by 19’ is a 10th-magnitude star. F very slightly N of 3646 by 8’ is another much smaller galaxy (3649), which is just a tiny round spot; it has a threshold star just S of it, just outside the halo. 3649 has no real central brightening or nucleus, just a 0.3’ halo.

12:44
NGC 3689 (Leo): Above Leo’s tail now, for this little (0.75’ x 0.3’) P-F streak; it’s not well defined but does have a bright elongated core that makes up the majority of its area; the halo is quite thin. No nucleus visible… possibly maybe in averted? It’s a fairly obvious galaxy, though not overly bright. It’s bracketed to the S and due P by two brightish stars; the star to the S is 4.5’ from the galaxy and is 11th magnitude; the star to the P is 6.5’ from the galaxy and is 10.5 magnitude, so the galaxy serves as the RA vertex of a right triangle which becomes a diamond by adding a 9th-magnitude star that’s SP the galaxy by 13’. A couple of other bright stars in the field include one 21’ NF the galaxy and one SF galaxy by 20’; these are both 9th magnitude.

12:58
NGC 3177 (Leo): This is not really one of the more-inspiring Herschels so far, just a 0.67’ round spot. It’s moderately bright and yet fairly mediocre; it has a tiny bright core with a small halo, and a very faint substellar nucleus. The halo is pretty well defined. P slightly N of the galaxy is a right triangle whose P-most vertex is 8’ P slightly N of the galaxy and is 11.5 magnitude and is followed by 4’ by an 11.5-magnitude star that’s the RA vertex; N very slightly P the RA vertex by 3.25’ is a 13th-magnitude star. NF the galaxy by 5.5’ is a 10th-magnitude star; N slightly P that star by 3’ is a 12th-magnitude star. SF the galaxy by 6.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star.

1:08
NGC 3655 (Leo): I missed this one earlier because it wasn’t on my SkySafari list (rather than not being on my Herschel 400/II lists, as a few have). If I didn’t need it for the list, I wouldn’t necessarily bother with it anyway–it’s not a particularly-inspiring Herschel either (although it’s still a galaxy!) The galaxy is 0.75’ x 0.3’, elongated SsP-NsF. It has a well-defined halo and a substellar nucleus; it gradually brightens to the nucleus, and a core is hard to define. NF the galaxy by 2.5’ is a 13th-magnitude star. F slightly S by 0.5’ is a 10th-magnitude star with a 9th-magnitude star F slightly S of it by 6’ and a 10.5-magnitude star S very slightly P it by 12’.

1:22
NGCs 3912 [3899], 3900 (Leo): 3912: This galaxy is just a faint N-S sliver, not particularly large at 0.75’ x 0.3’. It has a little bit of elongated central brightening but no nucleus visible and no definable core. The galaxy lies in an area barren of stars for about 8’ radius; there’s just just one faint star in that area. Along the P edge of the field is an arc of six stars that’s 18’ long and has its brightest stars on the N and S ends, and the arc bows out to the P; these stars are regularly spaced 3-4’ apart; on the N end is a 12.5-magnitude star which is N slightly P the galaxy by 11.5’, and at the S end, 11’ from the galaxy, is a 12th-magnitude star; the stars in between are all in the 12th/13th-magnitude range; the star at the S end is also the end of another arc and is the second star from the SF end of the second arc, which is 24’ long and has as its brightest an 11th-magnitude star that’s the third from the NP end; these arcs intersect at the star at the S end of the N-S arc. NsP the galaxy by 35’ is NGC 3900: this galaxy is also N-S elongated, but much more impressive than 3912. It’s 1.75’ x 1.0’ and much the brighter of the two, with an obvious small core region and an obvious stellar nucleus but a less-defined halo. The galaxy lies in the middle of the hypotenuse of a right triangle, with the 12.5-magnitude RA vertex SF it by 4.75’; a 12th-magnitude star lies P very very slightly S of the RA vertex by 4.75’ and is also 3.25’ due S of the galaxy; from the RA vertex N slightly P by 6.5’ is the third vertex, which is 11th-magnitude; this last star is NF the galaxy by 4.5’. Between the two galaxies (and a little bit F) is a small Y-shaped pattern of four 12.5/13th-magnitude stars that’s 1.75’ long and points NP; this pattern is 17’ SF NGC 3900.

I felt a lot better about the Herschel hunt after tonight; I’d managed to cover a lot of the ground I’d missed with the early April rains and my own (understandable) slacking off the previous time out. I still had a few galaxies left to sweep up in Leo, plus a few others in Leo Minor, Coma Berenices, Canes Venatici, and Virgo that remained. The Ursa Major galaxies… well, I would have to pick off some of them here and there, then make a serious push through them in Spring 2020 to get to where I needed to be. Those Ursa Major galaxies I didn’t get to this spring would be my final Herschel targets of all, as I had only open clusters and nebulae in the mid-to-late winter sky also remaining on my list, and those would have to somehow get finished this coming winter.

III. We returned to Eureka two nights later; New moon wasn’t for two nights yet, but we were starting to see better day-to-day forecasts.  The crowd was bigger on this particular night, too: in addition to me and Jerry, Oggie was there for the first time in quite a while, and Jeff P was there with a friend.  Later in the evening, Mike D and a friend of his would also show up with scopes.

It turned out to be one of our best-ever nights at Eureka, with an SQM reading of 21.5, fine transparency and seeing, and moderate temperatures. It was a busy night, too—in addition to an assortment of galaxies, I also took post-meridian looks at two of the best spring planetary nebulae, which I had been saving for Eureka (due to the flat southern horizon, Eureka was better suited to observing low in the sky). I still had to observe NGC 6543, the Cat’s-Eye Nebula in Draco, but that was nearly circumpolar and I could retrieve it at almost any time. And I still had one globular cluster left (Messier 68), having taken NGC 2419 the previous session.

But the strangest part of the evening occurred at the beginning. As we were finishing setup and waiting for darkness to complete, an additional pair of headlights approached; this was obviously someone who wasn’t there for astronomy, and as I was set up in the middle of the “road,” there was no way for him to pass. Having had a few uncomfortable encounters with trucks at Eureka, I expected the worst. But the truck’s lights went dark and a fellow named Jason debarked from it, talking quite interestedly to Jerry, who had met the truck as it stopped.

Jason was an owl-caller—an actual, legitimate caller of owls.  He was at Eureka to see how the local owl populations were doing, and his work entailed imitating the owls’ calls and making note of any replies.  He demonstrated several times with different calls; I don’t recall if he got any responses.  He did, however, express some wonder that astronomers were using this spot, and he stayed long enough to check out several objects through Jerry’s binoscope.

04/30-05/01/19
EUREKA RIDGE
MOON: 26 days (rose at 5:02 AM; 11% illuminated)
SEEING: 7
TRANSPARENCY: 7+
SQM: 21.5
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: damp, temps in low 50s, some breeze
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, JP, JP’s ladyfriend (Jen/Jan); AB, owl caller guy (Jason), OG, Mike D, Mike’s friend

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:00
NGC 3242 (Hya): The Ghost of Jupiter, very low in Hydra. As always, the nebula is very bright. It’s 0.75’ x 0.67’, elongated NvsP-SvsF. Even without a filter, the central star is swamped by the nebula’s brightness. It’s obvious that the internal structure of the nebula is elongated, while the outer envelope is only slightly elliptical. At this aperture, magnification, and latitude it’s hard to pick out the central structure, just vague hints of inner structure. The outer fringe is more obvious on the S and P sides. The nebula sits in an active field. The brightest star in the field is NF the nebula by 19’ and is 8.5 magnitude; there’s another brightish (9.5-magnitude) star on the opposite side of the field (SP) which is 15’ from the nebula. Due S of the nebula by 2.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star, and F that star by 4.3’ is a 10th-magnitude star; those two and the nebula form a right triangle with a 5’ hypotenuse; the nebula is the N-most vertex, and the star to the S is the RA vertex. NP the nebula by 6’ is the S-most star in a small parallelogram; that star is 11th magnitude; there’s one just slightly fainter NF that one by 0.67’; from the second star NP by 2.25’ is a 12.5-magnitude star which has a 13th-magnitude star SP it by 0.5’; these make up the parallelogram. With the OIII filter, the nebula is of course brighter with more fringe; its overall size expands to about 1.0’. There’s still no central star visible, as the interior is too bright and the nebula swamps the star. With the OIII, however, the internal structure of the nebula is better visible/defined, especially in averted vision, but still needs more magnification. There appears to be, on the SP and NF, small gaps between the internal oval and the fringe; the nebula seems more “open” on those sides, with the fringe still more prominent on the S and P sides.

Jason took a look at M51 in the binoscope before bidding us happy observing and heading off on his rounds. His appearance at our session has become a part of EAS lore: “Hey, remember when…?”

10:18
NGC 4361 (Crv): I still have the O-III in from observing NGC 3242. This planetary is much larger, but despite having observed the two of them numerous times, I didn’t realize how much bigger 4361 is than 3242. It spans 1.5’ NP-SF x 1.0’ SP-NF, and is distinctly X-shaped (but irregular). In some ways it reminds me of the Bug Nebula. The central star, usually prominent, is barely visible with the OIII in. The nebula’s texture is much more diffuse along the SP-NF axis on the edges, and is better defined on the opposite axis. The nebula has very diffuse cottony edges, and is not well defined but fringy. Without the filter, the  central star really bursts forth; it looks to be 12th magnitude. The texture of the nebulosity is even more diffuse and less defined, and the nebula seems nearly rectangular and slightly smaller, 0.25/0.3’ smaller all around. There seems to be in the SP side a small knot, just a more-prominent speck within that corner. N of the nebula, 1.75’ from the central star, is a 14.5-magnitude star. F slightly N by 9’ is an 11th-magnitude star; N slightly F by 13’ is a 9th-magnitude star. N somewhat P by 7’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that has another 11.5-magnitude star N very slightly P of it by 3’. SP by 5.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star. SF nebula by 9’ is a 12th-magnitude star that has another slightly brighter (11.5 magnitude) SF it by 1.25’.

And then it was back to galaxies for the remainder of the evening:

10:40
NGC 3107 (Leo): completely unimpressive and maybe the most so of any Herschel I’ve looked at (at least recently), this is just a weak galaxy that I’m surprised I noticed. It’s no more than 0.3’ around and faint. It has the misfortune of being overshadowed by a bright (8th-mag) field star 2’ SF it that’s the brightest in the field and completely distracts from the galaxy. The galaxy itself has a distinct stellar nucleus and a mere smudge of a core; the halo is very small and indistinct. From the 8th-magnitude star NF by 5.3’ is a 12.5-magnitude star, and from the 8th-magnitude star SF by 2.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude which has another 13.5-magnitude star NF it by 2.5’. The second-brightest in the field is SP the 8th-magnitude star by 15’ and is 8.2 magnitude.

The next target was part of the Trio Within a Trio, the first Trio being M 95, M96, and M105; the Trio anchored by M105 itself is the second, the one “within.”

10:51
M105, NGC 3384 [3371], NGC 3389 [3373] (Leo): This is the third Leo Trio (after the famous one and the M95/96/105 trio, of which this is basically a trio within a trio), and as nice a galaxy trio as you can get after the other two. M105 is roundish, 1.75’ diameter, but maybe very slightly elongated P-F. It has a very small bright core and substellar nucleus; the outer halo is quite diffuse and pretty well defined, and has a “cottony” texture. The core fits the definition of “blazing.” It forms a nice isosceles triangle with NGC 3384 and 3389 (which are also called 3371 and 3373 respectively). The brightest star in the field is 19’ P M105 and is 9.5 magnitude; NP that star (just outside the field with M105 centered) by 10’ is a 7th-magnitude star. N of 105 by 4.5’ is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s another 13th-magnitude star due N of that one by 4.5’; N very very slightly F of 105 by 19’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. NGC 3384 is NF M105 (core to core is about 7’), and about 6.5’ SF to 3389. This one is greatly elongated SP-NF, 3.25’ x 1.25’. It also has a bright stellar nucleus, and a pretty-obvious core, which the galaxy becomes suddenly bright to. The galaxy is distinctly less concentrated than M105; the halo is even more diffuse than that of M105 and even less well defined. SF 3384 by 2.25’ is a 14th-magnitude star; 6.5’ SF 3384 is 3389, the most unconcentrated of the trio. It’s 10’ F M105, and elongated P very slightly N-F very slightly S, 2.25’ x 1.25’. It has less central brightening than the other two, with a slightly-brighter core (elongated along the major axis) and a tiny, faint stellar nucleus that pops mostly in averted vision. It’s still pretty well-defined but doesn’t have the same level of central brightening as the others. An inclined spiral? The halo has some really feeble mottling, as it’s not entirely evenly illuminated. 3389 has NF and SF it a number of stars of 10th/11th/12th magnitudes: SF by 5’ is an 11th-magnitude star that has a 12th-magnitude star SF it by 2.25’; due N of the first star by 4’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; this last star is flanked on NP and F very very slightly S by 1.25’ by a pair of 13.5-magnitude stars; the brighter (11.5 magnitude) star of those three is due F 3389 by 4.25’. 5.5’ NF 3389 is a 10.5-magnitude star; NF that star by 1.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star.

Listening to these recordings several months later, I could plainly hear numerous mosquitoes bussing on the recordings; I don’t recall them being that bad, but I must’ve blotted that part of the memory out.

11:12
NGC 3412 (Leo): We’re still in the belly of Leo here, with this pretty nice galaxy that’s not far from the M105 trio. This is very much an elongated spiral, 2.0’ x 0.75’ N very slightly P-S very slightly F, with a very bright core and a substellar nucleus. It’s not really evenly bright along the major axis, perhaps mottled? Just outside the N edge of the halo is a star just above threshold (I can still hold steady in direct vision). Due S of the galaxy by 5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star which has another of 12.5 magnitude SF it by 2’. NP the galaxy by 7’ is a 12th-magnitude star. N somewhat F the galaxy by 12’ is another 12th-magnitude star; N of that star by 3.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; from that star NF by 2.75’ is an 8.5-magnitude star. The brightest star in the field is SF the 8.5-magnitude star by 7’ and is 7.5 magnitude; this one is 16’ NF the galaxy.

11:22
NGCs 3377, 3367 (Leo): This Herschel galaxy is over by 52 Leonis. The galaxy serves as the RA vertex of a large right triangle. It’s 1.5’ x 0.67’, elongated SP-NF, with a very slightly brighter core and substellar nucleus; the halo is pretty well defined and  brightish. In the NF end of the halo is a possible threshold star?? [This isn’t borne out in photographs.] F slightly S of the galaxy by 9’ [a satellite cuts through the galaxy] is an 11th-magnitude star with an 11.5-magnitude star F it by 6’; this last star is not part of the triangle; the third vertex is N slightly F the galaxy by 15’ and is 8th magnitude. N and NP the galaxy by 17’ is an arc of three 9.5-11th magnitude stars that starts N very slightly P of the galaxy and arcs P very slightly S from that star; the faintest is the one at the F end of the arc and N very slightly P of the galaxy; P very slightly N of the galaxy by 23’ (outside the field) is a 6th-magnitude star. S very very very slightly P the galaxy by 21’ is a 9th-magnitude star, and from that star P slightly N by 10’ is another, much larger, much more diffuse galaxy that’s SP 3377 by 22’ (3367): this one is roughly roundish, 2.0’ across [and just got split by a bright satellite going the opposite direction {NP-SF}  of the previous satellite]. It’s irregularly bright in the middle, with a faint substellar nucleus and an irregularly-bright and -shaped core that’s not overly well defined; it’s almost C-shaped in the core, with the opening of the C to the P slightly N? The halo is very diffuse. 2.25’ SP x 2.75’ S very slightly P of the galaxy’s nucleus are a pair of 12.5-magnitude stars; the brighter of a striking pair lies 10’ due S of the galaxy and is 9th magnitude with a 10.5-magnitude star 0.67’ P it.

At this point, Mike D arrived with a buddy and a scope in tow.

11:45
NGC 3338 (Leo): This galaxy is really big, really ghostly, really diffuse, really elongated… a whole lot of “reallys.” It’s 3.25’ x 1.25’, elongated P-F, with a large interior region of slightly greater brightness and a stellar nucleus that’s pretty faint. The halo seems a little brighter along the N and more diffuse along the S edge. An excellent inclined spiral! The galaxy lies toward the S end of a narrow football-shaped pattern, of which the brightest star is 2.5’ P the galaxy’s nucleus and is 9th magnitude; the second-brightest (11th magnitude) and N end of the ellipse is N of the galaxy’s nucleus by 5.25’; the other three stars: the 9th-magnitude star to the P has 2.25’ N and S very slightly F it a pair of 13th-magnitude stars; the 13th-magnitude star on the S very slightly F from the 9th-magnitude star on P is 3.25’ NF that star and 2’ N of the galaxy. 16’ NP the galaxy is the brightest star in the field at 7.5 magnitude; that star has SF it by 4’ a 9.5-magnitude star. S of the galaxy by 17’ is an 8.5-magnitude star.

11:57
NGC 3489 (Leo): A bright, obvious, impressive galaxy (not that that’s a rarity in Leo). It’s not super large–1.75’ x 0.75’–and elongated P slightly S-F slightly N. It has a well-defined halo containing a small bright core and a bright stellar nucleus. 1.5’ P very slightly S of the nucleus is a 13.5-magnitude star; 2.5’ P very slightly S that star is another of 13.5 magnitude. P the galaxy by 8’ is an 11th-magnitude star that’s the S-most vertex of a diamond; NF it by 1.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star; 2’ NP the 13th-magnitude star is a 14.5-magnitude star; 2.25’ S very slightly P the 14.5 is a 14th-magnitude star (which is 1.3’ NP the 11th-magnitude star); these four comprise the diamond. N of the galaxy by 10’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that has a 12.5-magnitude S very very slightly F it by 1.67’. The brightest star in the field is NF the galaxy by 14’ and is 9.5 magnitude; it has SF and F slightly N it a pair of 11.5-magnitude stars; the star SF is 4.5’ it and the star F slightly N by 5.5’.

12:14
NGC 3596 (Leo): This interesting galaxy is very diffuse and definitely has an impression of mottledness; the halo is poorly concentrated and it has a very weak, very small core and/or a very faint stellar nucleus. It’s very likely a face-on spiral,  and is round, 2.0’ across, and in the middle of a diamond of faint stars, square in the middle of the two axes; F the galaxy by 4.75’ from the core/nucleus is a 13.5-magnitude star; there’s a 14th-magnitude star due N of the galaxy by 3.25’; 3.75’ S very slightly P the galaxy is another 13.5-magnitude star; P the galaxy by 7’ is a 12.5-magnitude star that is the F-most corner of an irregular polygon that has 3.75’ NP that star an 11.5-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star SP the previous by 4.75’; S of that star by 2’ is another of 11th magnitude; S very very slightly F the second 11th-magnitude star by 2’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; F that star by 2’ is a 12th-magnitude star; these six form a rough C-shape open to the SF. F very very slightly S of the galaxy by 13’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; NP the galaxy by 16’ is the brighter and more-F of a pair, which is 11th magnitude and has P very very slightly S of it by 0.67’ an 11.5-magnitude star. N very slightly F the galaxy by 20’ is the brightest in the field, which is 7.5 magnitude.

12:29
NGC 3593 (Leo): A good one!  This is a P-F elongated spiral, smaller and fainter than NGC 3377, with a better defined halo than 3596. It spans 2.67’ x 0.75’, with a brighter, elongated interior region/core and what looks like a stellar nucleus that’s quite faint. The halo to the S, along the S edge, seems to have better definition; it’s more diffuse on the N. The P end seems to be a tiny bit brighter than the F. The galaxy is the N vertex of a diamond which includes a 10.5-magnitude star 6.5’ S slightly P the galaxy; 12’ due S of the galaxy is the brightest in the diamond at 8.5 magnitude; there’s an 11th-magnitude star S slightly F the galaxy by 9.5’. There’s also a pair of 13.5-magnitude stars due SF; the closest is 3.5’ from the galaxy, the other 5’. The brightest in the field are two of 7.5 magnitude: one due F the galaxy by 20’ and the other 22’ SF. P the galaxy by 7.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star that’s the right-angle vertex of a small triangle; it has S very slightly F it by 0.75’ a 13th-magnitude star, and the third vertex is NF the right-angle vertex by 1.25’ and is 13.5 magnitude.

12:47
NGC 3547 (Leo): This one’s something of a disappointment–it’s not impossible, and even moderately obvious when it’s swept into field, but there’s not much to it. It’s elongated N-S, 0.75’ x 0.3’, and looks at first glance to be irregular shaped, almost peanut-like, without a lot of distinction between the halo and the core. No nucleus is visible, even with averted vision. The halo is quite ghostly but still reasonably well defined. SP the galaxy by 4’ is a 10th-magnitude star. There’s a 12th-magnitude star N slightly P by 3.5’; N slightly P by 2.3’ from that star is a 13th-magnitude star.  11’ due N of the galaxy is a 10.5-magnitude star which has F very slightly S of it by 2.5’ an 11th-magnitude star. There’s an interesting pair due P galaxy by 10’ to the closer of the two; the closer is slightly fainter at 12th magnitude, with an 11.5-magnitude star P slightly S of it by 0.67’.

1:00
NGC 3611 (Leo): Into the southern reaches of Leo for this nondescript galaxy, which reminds me in many ways of NGC 3547 (although it has a bit more detail to be culled from it). It’s small and not particularly bright but kind of well bounded; elongated N-S, 0.75’ x 0.5’, with a very obvious substellar nucleus and a moderately well defined halo. There’s a distractingly-bright star N (and slightly P) by 3.25’; the star is 10.5 magnitude, bright enough to cause issues with observing the galaxy, which is otherwise isolated from stars; there are no other reasonably-bright ones within an 8’ radius (there’s a 14th-magnitude star 5.25’ to the SF). Due S by 7’ is the more F of a pair of 12.5-magnitude stars separated by 1’, with the second (slightly dimmer) P slightly S of the first. Almost due S by 7.5’ from the first of the pair is the brightest in the field, which is 8th magnitude.

1:14
NGCs 3640, 3641 (Leo): An impressive bright elliptical-looking galaxy, NGC 3640 is considerably bright, round, 1.75’ across. The halo is pretty well defined. The galaxy has a brighter core that’s 0.5’ across, and the halo comes gradually to it. There’s also an obvious nucleus that’s stellar. Due N by 2.25’ is a 14.5-magnitude star that’s just barely held in direct vision; due S of the galaxy by 2.5’ is a tiny fuzzy round spot (3641) with a distinct stellar nucleus that outshines the rest of the little galaxy; the whole galaxy is very hard to hold steady; it’s no more than 0.3’ across at best, and is evenly illuminated aside from the nucleus. Back to 3640: S very slightly P it by 4.75’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. SF the galaxy by 9’ is the brightest in the field, which is 10th magnitude; there’s a 10.5-magnitude star SP the galaxy by 14’. P very very slightly S galaxy by 7.5’ is the F-most of a pair of 14th-magnitude stars, with the second F very slightly N the first by 0.75’. NF the galaxy by 11’ is the brighter of another pair, which is 10.5 magnitude and has an 11.5-magnitude star SF it by 1’.

1:29
NGC 3666 (Leo): This is the last for the night, although it’s not a particularly great one to end on; it’s been a great night, but I have to work in the morning (there are a couple more on Chart 13 that I didn’t get to). This one is a nice but rather ghostly P-F spiral that spans 2.25’ x 0.75’. It’s in the field with a very bright (6th-magnitude) star, NF the galaxy by 9.5’, which is a pain in the ass. The galaxy is fairly well defined; there’s not a lot of central brightening, and the whole is pretty evenly illuminated. There’s no nucleus, even in averted vision. And it’s not at all diffuse: “what you see is what you get.” N very very slightly F by 1’ is a 14th-magnitude star; there’s a 13.5-magnitude star due F that one by 3.5’ . N of the galaxy by 12’ is the right-angle vertex of a small triangle made of 12th-magnitude stars; N of the right-angle vertex by 1.67’ is another and the third vertex is P the right-angle vertex by 2.5’; there’s a 13th-magnitude star P that last star by 3.75’, giving the triangle an “extended” S edge. P and SP the galaxy, each by 7.5’, are 13th-magnitude stars, so that the galaxy forms an equilateral triangle with them as the F-most vertex.

An excellent night, perhaps the best ever at Eureka, and certainly the best since January. I don’t recall why we left so early; certainly there was time to do more. Sometimes, though, it’s best to leave some stones unturned, or to leave some fish for the next time out.

IV. “The next time out” happened to be at Eagle’s Ridge two nights later; we’ve long had a philosophy of chasing the best forecast, and that for Eagle’s looked outstanding.

And it was.

Only once that I’ve been to Eagle’s Ridge has the SQM reading exceeded 21.7. This night’s came oh-so-close.  And after the first night of the run, when I said that M51 and M101 were the best I’d ever seen them, this particular night surpassed it.  I didn’t even look at M13, which is unusual. This was a rare night, and it made for some of the best observations I’ve ever done.

05/02-05/03/19
EAGLE’S RIDGE (junction)
MOON: 28 days; rose at 5:27 AM (4% illuminated)
SEEING: 7
TRANSPARENCY: 7
SQM: 21.69
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps fallen to low-40s, no breeze, no dew, excellent skies–got very cold
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, KO, RA, FS, OG, Donn M

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:06
NGC 3521 (Leo): Night four of the run begins with this terrific galaxy; I found it well before dark settled in, and I’ve been following for a while as it gets darker. This one, well below figure of Leo, coulda been a Messier—it’s a huge bright spiral, 4.5’ x 1.75’, elongated N very slightly P-S very slightly F. It has a well defined halo that looks a bit wider to the N than to the S, a small somewhat brighter core and blazing unmistakable stellar nucleus; the nucleus is bright enough that it could pass as a bright field star even if the rest of the galaxy couldn’t be seen. The halo seems cut off more on the P side than on the F, it’s sharper on the P: a dust lane? The nucleus may be offset toward the P just a slight bit; the halo is wider on the F side of the nucleus than on the P The galaxy is housed in a pretty active field in terms of stars; the brightest of these is F slightly S of the galaxy by 11’; that star is 8th magnitude and has a 10th-magnitude star 11’ S of it; S very very slightly P the 8th-magnitude star by 1.75’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. The galaxy is bracketed to the N and S very very slightly P by a pair of 12.5-magnitude stars, each 6’ from the galaxy; there’s a 13th-magnitude NP the galaxy by 6.25’, making a not-quite-equilateral triangle with the galaxy’s nucleus and the 12.5-magnitude star to the N; 3.75’ NP the 13th-magnitude star is an 11th-magnitude star. P the galaxy by 13’ is the more-F of a pair of 10.5-magnitude stars that are separated P-F by 2.67’. Outside the field, P very slightly N of the galaxy by 32’, is a 6th-magnitude star which is accompanied by a 7.5-magnitude star F very slightly S of it by 7’.

10:28
NGCs 3705, 3692 (Leo): This is one of the last in Leo proper! NGC 3705 is a fine (not quite as fine as 3521) galaxy, 2.5’ x 0.75’, elongated PsN-FsS. It has a much fainter halo than 3521 but a more noteworthy core; the core is more obvious, and contains an obvious nucleus (just this side of substellar). The halo is a bit less well defined, more diffuse than that of 3521. There’s an interesting triangle of field stars starting due NF with the S-most of the three, which is 10th magnitude and 7’ from the galaxy; from there, N very slightly F by 2.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star; from the 12th-magnitude star 2’ N slightly P is a 9th-magnitude star. There’s also a triangle of brightish stars NP the galaxy: the S-most vertex is the closest to the galaxy and is 6.5’ NP the galaxy and is 10.5 magnitude; due N of that star by 4.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; almost due P that second star by 4’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; the 11.5-magnitude star is at the P end of a very short arc within the triangle that gets fainter as it stretches F; 1.25’ F slightly S of that third vertex is a 12th-magnitude star; F very slightly N of that star is a 13.5-magnitude star that’s 0.67’ F very slightly N of the 12th-magnitude star, and these form the arc. 11’ S slightly F the galaxy’s nucleus is the brightest in the field, which is 8th magnitude and has due P it by 4’ a 12.5-magnitude star. P slightly N of the galaxy by 15’ is a 10th-magnitude star; P slightly N of that star by another 13’ is NGC 3692: this galaxy is fainter than 3705, and considerably smaller (1.5’ x 0.3’). It’s oriented almost due P-F, with very subtle central brightening along its length and a very faint stellar nucleus that takes averted vision to hold steady. The halo is pretty well defined but not as obvious as in 3705. 2.25’ NF the nucleus of 3692 is a 13.5-magnitude star that mucks up the observation by drawing the eye away from the nucleus. Due F the galaxy, 4.5’ from the nucleus, is a 14th-magnitude star that also interferes. P very very slightly N of the galaxy by 10’ is an 8.5-magnitude star.

The next field brought out new galaxies almost everywhere I looked—on a lesser night, I might’ve missed a bunch of these.

10:53
NGCs 4045, 4045A, 4073, 4139, 4140, 4063;  PGC 38075; UGC 7034 (Vir): This lot lies between Zavijava and 16 Vir. 4045: a small round galaxy, probably elliptical [no, it’s a spiral], 0.67’ across. There’s some gradual brightening across the galaxy’s center to a not-much-brighter core that isn’t “well established”–the halo isn’t as well defined as I’d thought, as a glance at a photograph later shows that I missed most of the halo entirely. There’s definitely a stellar nucleus; it’s not easy but it’s there. F very slightly S of the galaxy by 1.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. S of the galaxy by 1.5’ is a really small very faint averted-mostly glow (4045A) that has a visible nucleus that’s the only “jumping-out” feature of it. I can’t pick out dimensions or anything, as it’s just a very difficult glowing spot. In direct vision, the only aspect of it visible is its tiny stellar point of a nucleus. F slightly N of 4045 by 4’ is the P-most in a line of four stars, which is 12.5 magnitude and has 2’ SF of it a 13th-magnitude star; continuing SF by 1.75’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; F very slightly S of that star by 1.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star; 0.5’ N very slightly F from that star is another tiny averted-only glow (PGC 38075) spotted when looking at the previous tiny galaxy. This one is fainter than the previous, much more so, averted-vision only and then no more than ¾ of the time. There’s no nucleus to latch onto, and the halo is very small, less than 0.25’. 9’ NF the 11th-magnitude star at the end of the line is another small, faint galaxy with a nucleus that stands out a bit more than the rest of it (UGC 7034) . This galaxy is also only 0.25’ around, and only its nucleus is holdable in direct vision. It does have a tiny core visible and a very faint halo. (There are little ones all over the place here.) 27’ F slightly S of 4045 is NGC 4073: considerably brighter than 4045!  This galaxy is elongated P-F, 1.5’ x 0.75’, and has a diffuse outer halo and a prominent core. [A satellite cuts through the field] No nucleus? In averted there may be just a very faint nucleus. (The galaxy does have a 13.5-magnitude star S of it by 1.75’, which may contribute to the difficulty of spotting the nucleus.) 21’ NF 4073 is the brightest star in the field, which is magnitude 7.5 and has 2.5’ F very slightly N of it a 10th-magnitude star. N slightly F the galaxy by 6’ is the P slightly S of a pair of nearly-equal 10.5-magnitude stars, which are separated by 0.75’. From 4073 S very slightly F by 6’ is the more P and smaller of another pair of tiny galaxies (4139), which is a faint round spot that’s very hard to hold in direct vision, but does have a nucleus as its most visible aspect. F this galaxy and very slightly S by 1.3’ is another that’s much bigger (4140), 0.67’ x 0.25’ and elongated S very slightly P-N very slightly F, with some distinct central brightening and an obvious substellar nucleus (at times looks like a double nucleus [due to an embedded star]). SP 4073 by 6’ is the other aforementioned very faint galaxy (4063): this one’s almost entirely an averted object; it has a tiny stellar nucleus that shows only in averted, but the galaxy is just an impression in direct vision.

11:28
NGC 3254 (LMi): A very elongated and impressive galaxy, just a really nice sliver of a galaxy in a field with a lot of bright stars. The galaxy is elongated SP-NF, 2.0’ x 0.3’… a flat galaxy?? It’s obviously an edge-on spiral. There’s a really distractingly-bright star N slightly P in field, so I’m getting it out of field to finish the observation. The galaxy has a fairly well defined halo, not ghostly at all, and a distinct circular core for an edge-on; there’s also a substellar nucleus that’s pretty obvious. The galaxy is not as bright as some from earlier this evening, but it’s very fine nonetheless, and it stands out well in the field. It has P very very slightly N of it by 3’ a 14th-magnitude star, and in the same direction, 8.5’ from the galaxy, is a 10th-magnitude star. There’s a very interesting pair of near-equal stars 6’ F and F very slightly N of galaxy; the star F the galaxy is just a slight bit dimmer (9.5 and 10th magnitudes), the two separated by 1.25’. The brightest (magnitude 6.5) star in the field is N very slightly P the galaxy by 15’ and is at the center of a ‘y’ pattern of very bright stars, with the stem to the P and the star that marks the end of the stem a very close faint double that’s P the bright star by 5’ and is separated by 8”, with the brighter component N very slightly F the fainter; these are 11th and 11.5-magnitudes. 6’ F slightly S of the 6.5-magnitude star’ is a 9th-magnitude star and F slightly N of it by 7’ is a 10th-magnitude star.

The next galaxy went immediately on my “must reobserve” list.

12:08
NGC 3432 (LMi): An unusual and fascinating galaxy! (“Quite picaresque,” in my recording.) It’s very much an edge-on… of a sort. It’s elongated SP-NF, 3.5’ x 0.75’. The halo, along the galaxy’s length, is very irregular in brightness; it seems similar to NGC 520, where there are two parts offset over the top of each other, like a double vision thing, only clearer than NGC 520. There’s a ribbon of central brightening along the galaxy but nothing like a core or nucleus; just central brightening in general, like NGC 3628 in the Leo Trio in this regard, having a distorted disk. On the NF end seem to be a couple of very thin dark filaments overlaid on the halo. The most interesting feature is that galaxy has a number of overlaid stars; at the NF end, ¾ of the way from the SP and just outside the F edge of the halo is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s a 12.5-magnitude star along the P edge toward the SP end, 0.3’ from the SP end of the galaxy; N very very slightly P the 12.5-magnitude star (on the SP end) by 0.3’ is a 13.5-magnitude star that’s just outside the P edge of the galaxy. 3.5’ N very very slightly P the star on the F end of the galaxy is a 14th-magnitude star. The galaxy is framed inside the hypotenuse of a right triangle consisting of three 8.5/9th-magnitude stars; at the NF corner (at one end of the hypotenuse) is a 9th-magnitude star, 6.5’ from the center of the galaxy; 8’ SP the center of the galaxy is the second vertex, which is 10th magnitude; the right-angle vertex is 9’ due NP of galaxy and is 10th magnitude; the right-angle vertex has 7’ F it a 9th-magnitude star that has an 11.5-magnitude star S very very slightly P it by 5’. This is an outstanding object, and one that’s definitely worth re-examining at a later date with higher magnification and/or bigger aperture.

I’d been saving NGC 3628 for the end of my Leo observations; there’s a lot to say here, even without the two nearby Messiers.

12:29
M65, M66, NGC 3628 (Leo): the Leo Trio! NGC 3628 is a monster of a galaxy! NGC 3628 is bigger than M65 and 66 combined.  (I have to put my gloves on; we’ve reached “peak cold” on the evening.)This enormous galaxy is 10’ x 1.75’, elongated PvsN-FvsS; the central region alone is 5’ x 0.75’. I’m not seeing a nucleus–maybe just a faint trace of a nucleus at certain fleeting moments? The outer regions of the disk are diffuse to point of being difficult to trace; they’re very poorly defined and vanish into the background sky, and it’s clear that the galaxy extends past the dimensions I’ve given despite being unable to see where it ends. The inner region looks like  “a core within a core” due to having several brightness gradients. The S edge of the disk, especially along the brighter region, is fainter but much sharper defined than the N edge; there’s definitely a cutoff of light there. On the F edge, 5.5’ from the center of the galaxy and just outside the SF edge of the halo, is a 13.5-magnitude star. Another even fainter star lies halfway between that star and the center of the galaxy; just a threshold object, impossible to hold steady in direct vision and quite close to the edge of the brighter interior region of the galaxy. On the P edge and N, I’m almost suspecting the galaxy’s dark lane in averted vision.  NP the center of the galaxy by 4.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star; N very very slightly P that star by 1’ is a 14.5-magnitude star; 2.75’ N of that star is a 10th-magnitude star. S slightly P the galaxy by 6’ is a 10th-magnitude star which has a 14th-magnitude star S very slightly F it by 2’. NF the galaxy by 16’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; there’s another 9.5-magnitude star NP the galaxy by 15’. Just on the SP edge of the field, and 21’ SP 3628, is a 7th-magnitude star; from the 7th-magnitude star due S by 18’ is M65: this extremely-bright galaxy is elongated N very slightly P-S very slightly F, 6.5’ long x 1.75’. It’s kind of M31-ish in its light curve, with a large oval core and a faint stellar nucleus. The halo is pretty well defined, although the galaxy is diffuse on the corners. From the center of the galaxy NF by 2’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; from the same distance S very slightly P is a 12th-magnitude star. 21’ F very slightly S of M65 is M66; it’s maybe not as long as M65, but wider and brighter overall. The galaxy spans 5.5’ x 2.0’, with a bright, somewhat elongated core and a very obvious substellar nucleus. It’s oriented roughly same as M65 but appears that to the S, where there’s much more diffuse cottony matter in the halo, there’s also some irregularity in the halo’s brightness; every now and then the hook of the S spiral arm seems fairly evident, sweeping P from the P edge of the halo down S and then SF slightly; there’s definitely a gap in the brightness coming in from the SF. The core seems off-centered to the P; it seems that there’s more of the halo to the S and F than N and P. There’s an interesting backward ?-pattern of five 10th-magnitude and fainter stars; the brightest of these is the closest to the galaxy, NP the galaxy by 2.5’; NP that star by 3’ is an 11th-magnitude star; NP that star by 2.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; N slightly P that star by 1.75’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; there’s an 11th-magnitude star S slightly P that star by 3.25’. It’s an awesome sight, the Leo Trio; with 3628 on the N end of the field, the 14mm ES can just barely frame all three galaxies in the 42’ field.

12:55
NGC 4643 (Vir): This galaxy is bright but smallish, 1.25’ x 1.0’, elongated NP-SF. It’s intriguing because the halo is oval, but the brighter inner region is much more severely elongated and thinner, like an edge-on galaxy overlaid on an elliptical. There’s a very bright core which is quite small, with extensions along the galaxy’s length; the galaxy also has a stellar nucleus. N very slightly P the galaxy by 2.3’ is a 12th-magnitude star; there’s a 13.5-magnitude star NP that star by 2’; 1’ F very slightly N of that star is a 14.5-magnitude star. N very slightly F the galaxy by 12’ is the brightest in the field, which is 8.5 magnitude. S of the galaxy are a couple of asterisms, including an arc of four stars that’s S slightly P the galaxy, with its brightest star on the NP end and stars trailing 4.25’ SF from there; there’s also a backward lowercase ‘y’ SF the galaxy that opens to the S with its stem to the NF; its brightest star is on the SP, and all four of the stars in the ‘y’ are in the 10.5-12th magnitude range.

Somewhere earlier in the evening, I realized that it had gotten extremely cold—maybe not on the thermometer, but certainly in the experiencing. I’d already put my winter coat on, but gloves had also become a constant necessity by this point.

1:05
NGCs 4666, 4668 (Vir): a beautifully elongated spiral “of the SP-NF persuasion,” spanning 3.75’ x 0.67’. It’s classic in brightness profile and everything else, with a halo that’s the textbook definition of the term “well defined,” a nice bright elongated central region and a distinct stellar nucleus. NP the galaxy by 8’ is a 9.5-magnitude star. There’s a compact trio of stars S very slightly F the galaxy; the closest of these to the galaxy is the brightest at 11.5-magnitude and is 5’ from the galaxy; due S of that star by 0.67’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; halfway between them and very slightly F is a 13.5-magnitude star. F the star-trio by 2.75’ is a very faint N-S glow (4668), 0.67’ x 0.5’, an unconcentrated spot with no nucleus or core, just the slightest hint of concentration; this one is very ghostly and had to be held in averted vision before it became visible directly.

I spent some time looking through some of the other usual objects of spring (e.g. NGC 4565, NGC 2903, etc.), but was already satisfied with the night’s work. We stayed on for another hour or so before the cold—and the promise of another session the next night—ended our time on the mountain.

V. When we convened on the fifth night of the May run, it was at a place we hadn’t observed from before.

The McKenzie Bridge airport is no more than an airstrip in the forest with a mountain ridge to the immediate south; the hamlet of McKenzie Bridge lies just to the west. The airport has two cement helipads and a couple of small outbuildings ; it’s flat, and is shielded from the OR-126 traffic by a dense treeline to the north. The treeline and the ridge (there’s always a ridge involved somehow) limit the sky to an east-west swath about 120˚ wide, losing the northern and southern 30˚ in the process. The tiny spring constellation Corvus didn’t quite clear the trees from where we ended up setting up—on one of the helipads.

It was EAS’ own Alan G who suggested the airport as an observing site; he’d done some astrophotography from there, and wanted some opinions on it suitability as an observing site, so he asked Jerry and I to join him there. Always on the lookout for a new astronomy hangout, we agreed. Mrs. Caveman, her father, and I made a day of it, dropping the telescope-loaded Caveman-Mobile at the gas-station/deli in McKenzie Bridge and doodling around the area with our dogs, getting a few hikes in, until it was time to think about meeting Alan and Jerry and setting up telescopes.

Family and dogs drove back home; observers stayed behind, debating where to set up. We settled for setting up on one of the helipads, but knew this would probably not be something to repeat—the odds of a helicopter needing to land there at night were very low, but during forest-fire season all bets were off. Were we to observe there again (and it’s pretty likely), we would set up north of the pads so as to be out of any potential landing path.

As the sky darkened, we could tell that it was going to get really dark there; the glow of Eugene was barely visible to the west, and there was nothing to the east to bring artificial lighting to the night. The problem was haze; there was a lot of cirrus overhead, and it took considerable time for it to clear out to where we were able to kinda-sorta trust the SQM and our eyes. Alan had brought his camera, Jerry his 10″ trackball, and I had the workhorse Bob the Dob with me.  It turned into yet another epic observing night.

05/04-05/05/19
MCKENZIE BRIDGE AIRPORT
MOON: New
SEEING: variable, 8-5
TRANSPARENCY: 5, later 6
SQM: 21.72
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: cirrusy, esp. early; temps in low 50s; air still, later dewy (lots of mosquitoes)
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, AG

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:13
NGC 3198 (UMa): very much a ghostly, diffuse, highly-inclined spiral by one of the feet of Ursa Major, this galaxy is huge and pretty stout, 6.0’ x 2.25’, and elongated SP-NF. It doesn’t have much in the way of central brightening, just an occasional flash of a very faint nucleus. The light from galaxy’s disk is irregular, perhaps a little mottled. The galaxy is equidistant from a pair of 9.5-magnitude stars, one to the SP and one to the NF, both by 11’. N of the galaxy by 3.75’ is a 12th-magnitude star; 3’ N slightly P that star is an 12.5-magnitude star. Due S of the galaxy by 1.75’ is a 14th-magnitude star. NP the galaxy by 10’ is a 10th-magnitude star; two 9.5-magnitude stars and the 10th-magnitude star form an isosceles triangle around the galaxy, which lies midway along the long side. A very impressive but ghostly, poorly-defined galaxy!

10:28
NGC 3675 (UMa): Just off the same foot of UM as 3198, this one is a lot like that previous galaxy. It’s quite large, 3.75’ x 1.25’, with a very diffuse outer envelope that’s poorly defined; it has a very bright, obvious substellar nucleus and a smooth core that the halo comes fairly abruptly to. The core is fairly bright. On the SvsP corner of the galaxy, just outside the halo, is a 13th-magnitude star; there’s another 2.5’ SF that is 14th-magnitude and is somewhat outside the halo, but not by much. Due P the galaxy by 3.25’ is the F-most vertex of an isosceles triangle made up of three 13.5-magnitude stars; the F-most is 3.25’ from the nucleus of the galaxy; the second is 1.75’ NP that star, and the other magnitude 13.5 is 1.75’ SP the first. A 14th-magnitude star lies 6’ NP the galaxy. A pair of brighter stars are to the S: by 11’ is a 10.5-magnitude star; 5’ PvsN of that 10.5-magnitude star is another of 10.5 magnitude, and exactly between the two is a 13th-magnitude star. There’s also a 9.5-magnitude star N slightly F the galaxy by 17’ that’s the brightest in the field.

10:40
NGCs 3583, 3577 (UMa): 3583: This smallish galaxy seems a bit elongated P-F, 1.25’ x 1.0’. It has a very tenuous outer halo that’s really poorly defined and diffuse halo, and a brighter core that’s 0.5’ round, although the core isn’t well defined either; the halo just comes gradually to the core. There’s a very faint stellar nucleus visible mostly in averted vision. [There’s a satellite running SP-NF in field.] SP the galaxy by 5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; just NP that star, every now and then, is a very faint, very small glow (3577) that has to be another galaxy–it’s not holdable in direct vision and is mostly an averted object; it’s exceedingly faint and small so it’s too hard to tell its orientation. N of 3583 by 4.25’ is a 13th-magnitude star that has following it by 1.25’ a 12.5-magnitude star. [A really bright satellite running S slightly F-N slightly P.] SF the galaxy by 6’ is a 9.5-mag star; there’s a 10th-magnitude star NF the galaxy by 6.5’, and this has an 11th-magnitude star N very very slightly F it by 3’. The field is well populated by stars in the 9th/10th-magnitude range, mostly on the periphery.

11:04
NGC 3319 (UMa): This is a quite difficult object. [Another bright satellite cuts through the field.] The galaxy is the very definition of “ghostly,” really poorly defined, and vaporous. The halo extends 3.5’ x 1.25’ and has a brighter central region/streak; it’s obviously an inclined spiral. [Now a meteor cuts through the field.] At first glance, the central region seems to be all that’s visible; there’s no nucleus. I might’ve missed the galaxy at first glance, due in part to a brightish star 20’ SF the galaxy, which is 8th magnitude and a distraction from the galaxy. There are two pairs of stars pointing toward the galaxy and one P it; due N of the galaxy by 6.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star with a 12th-magnitude 1.5’ N very very slightly P it; N slightly P the galaxy by 2.5’ is a 12.5-magnitude star with another 12.5-magnitude star 1.75’ N very slightly P it; SP the galaxy (along the major axis, SP-NF) by 6’ is an 11.5-magnitude star with another 11.5-magnitude NP it by 8’. An interesting asterism of five stars lies NF the galaxy by an average of 20’; these are 10th and 11th magnitudes and are in an 11’ wide arc that opens to the S and curves N at both ends, like Corona Borealis with ends chopped off; the stars are evenly spaced apart.

11:16
NGC 3877 (UMa): A really impressive edge-on, in same field as 4th-mag Chi UMa, which is 17’ due N of galaxy and is almost painful to look at. The galaxy is extended 3.0’ x 0.67’ SP-NF and the halo is bright and very well defined. It’s a classic saucer-shaped spiral, almost edge-on, with a lot of central brightening and an occasional glimpse of a faint stellar nucleus. The galaxy has NP it by 3.75’ a 10th-magnitude star; NP by 12’ is a 8th-magnitude star. The 10th-magnitude star is the P-most vertex in an isosceles triangle and has NF it by 5’ a 12.5-magnitude star which has SF it by 4.75’ a 12.5th-magnitude star. [A satellite flared in the middle of the field and faded before exiting the field.] Due P the galaxy by 14’ is the F-most of a trio that’s very compact, with that star and the one 0.3’ immediately P it both 12.5 magnitude and a 14th-magnitude star P very slightly N of the middle star by 0.75’.

11:38
NGCs 3893, 3896, 3928 (UMa): NGC 3893 is very much a face-on or elliptical galaxy [the former], based on its brightness profile. Its outer halo is kind of irregular in brightness, almost like a circle that’s broken in numerous places; the halo is mostly round, and well defined. The galaxy spans 1.5’, maybe 1.67’. It has a smallish (0.75’) bright core but no nucleus. On the NP, just inside the edge of the halo, is a 13th-magnitude star. SP the galaxy by 3’ is an 11th-magnitude star; SF the galaxy by 3.5’ is a 14th-magnitude star that has, just S of it, the outer halo of another very small galaxy (3896): perhaps 0.3’ diameter, with a quite diffuse halo and concentrated center with a faint substellar nucleus. S slightly P 3893 by 12’ is an 8.5-magnitude star; F 3893 by 33’ is another galaxy (3928): this galaxy is 0.67’ across, with a brighter core and a substellar nucleus. This galaxy has SF it by 1.25’ a 13.5-magnitude star and NP it by 2’ a 14th-magnitude star. Between 3893 and 3928 are two small triangles of stars, the second of which has N of it a pair of 11th/11.5-magnitudes separated by 1’, these are P 3928 by 5.75’.

11:50
NGC 3726 (UMa): Really impressive!! This Ursa Major galaxy is quite diffuse and ghostly but still large and very bright. It’s elongated N-S, 4.25’ x 1.5’ and weakly centrally concentrated, with an obvious (but not overly bright) stellar nucleus. The halo is very elliptical, rather than tapered, and better defined to the N where there’s a 12.5-magnitude star embedded just inside the N edge. It’s not a particularly bright field aside from a bright triangle of stars to the SP of the galaxy, the brightest of which is the SP-most and is 9th-magnitude, 18’ SP the galaxy; from that star due NF by 5.5’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; from the 9th-magnitude star F slightly N by 5.75’ is an 11th-magnitude star. S slightly P the galaxy by 4.75’ from the nucleus is an 11.5-magnitude star.

12:00
NGC 4013 (UMa):  Another in the feet of Ursa Major. This one is really helped by averted vision in terms of identifying structural features, even more than usual . It’s pretty bright but seeing the full extent of its disk is greatly benefitted by averted vision. It’s elongated P slightly S-F slightly N, 2.25’ x 0.5’, and has a surprisingly bright nucleus that overshadows every other aspect of the galaxy. The core is fairly small core; the nucleus is… 11.5 magnitude?? [I noted that this is possibly an embedded star, and it indeed appears to be.] 3.75’ SP the nucleus is a 12.5-magnitude star with another 12.5-magnitude almost due S it by 1.25’; also 9’ SP galaxy is a 12th-magnitude star.

12:10
NGC 3938 (UMa): Also impressive! This is a big, round, diffuse galaxy that’s gotta be a face-on spiral. It’s 2.75’ across, with a slightly brighter core and a diffuse, poorly defined halo. The core makes up the inner ⅓ of the halo and is very gradually brighter than the halo; it contains a very faint stellar nucleus. NP the galaxy by 9’ is a 9th-magnitude star. P very slightly N of the galaxy by 6.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star; N of the galaxy by 9’ is a 13th-magnitude star. SP the galaxy by 7’ is another 12th-magnitude star; N very slightly P that star by 2’ is a 14.5-magnitude star; P very slightly S of that star by 0.67’ is the brighter of a close double/pair, the components of which are 13.5 and 14.5-magnitudes, separated by 10”, with the secondary P very slightly S of the primary.

Despite the actual temperature, the air was beginning to feel more than a little bit chilly; the dew and the air temperature meant that winter coats were needed quite early on. The dew wasn’t as bad as it could’ve been, thanks to the cement helipad we were on, but it still accumulated on exposed gear and made the ambient temp seem a lot colder than it might have been.

12:24
NGC 4144 (UMa):  This is a fine edge-on spiral, another big impressive UMa galaxy; it’s elongated P very slightly N-F very slightly S, 3.25’ x 0.5’, and has a less well defined halo than many of the earlier galaxies, especially on the F end; the halo fades away more gradually there. There’s some slight central brightening along major axis, but the core-halo distinction is not very great, and the galaxy is more weakly concentrated and less-well defined than some others so far tonight. No nucleus is visible. Due N of the galaxy by 8’ is an impressive double that’s quite close and difficult; the seeing’s gotten really poor, and the transparency kind of murky, but the brighter component of the double is SP the fainter by 5”; these are 10th and 10.5 magnitudes, and their combined light makes them the second-brightest star in the field–the brightest in the field is SP the galaxy by another 8’, and is 9th magnitude. N slightly F the galaxy by 4.5’ is the S-most in a small right triangle, which is 13.5 magnitude; due N of it by 0.67’ is a 14.5 magnitude star; from the 13.5 F very slightly N by 2.25’ is a 13th-magnitude star. Just outside the field is an 8.5-magnitude star that’s 23’ F somewhat N of the galaxy.

12:38
NGC 3813 (UMa): Another bright one [and one that I’ve already done!]. This one is a little less impressive than some of the ones I’ve done tonight so far tonight. It’s a highly inclined spiral, smaller than some of the others at 2.0’ x 0.5’ (maybe a little less in the minor axis), elongated P-F. The central concentration is quite distinct, but there’s no nucleus visible. The core is quite large, and the halo’s not as expansive as many of the others tonight. It has a number of faint stars nearby; F the galaxy by 1.25’ from the center is a 14th-magnitude star, and there are 14.5-magnitude stars due P: one by 2.25’ and another by 3’; there’s yet another of 14.5 magnitude NP the galaxy by 3.75’. The brightest star in the field is P very slightly S of the galaxy by 14’ and is 8th magnitude; it’s the S-most of a trio of stars that runs NP-SF: from the 8th-magnitude star 4’ N slightly P is a 12th-magnitude star; an 11th-magnitude star lies N slightly P that star by 4’. NF the galaxy by 17’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; S of the galaxy by 10’ is an 11.5-magnitude star.

As I noted, I’d already taken notes on NGC 3813; it’s interesting to compare notes with my previous observation, given the difference between McKenzie and Dexter State Park (from which I’d made the previous observation of the galaxy). The darker site made a huge difference in my perceptions of the galaxy… as expected, of course, but it’s the amount and quality of that difference that’s noteworthy.

1:05
NGC 3941 (UMa): This is the second-last Herschel galaxy on Chart 6 of Sky Atlas 2000.0, and it took a while to find it (I dropped my glasses in the gravel, too). The galaxy is elongated N-S, spanning 1.75’ x 0.75’. It has a bright small core and it becomes suddenly bright at core; the outer halo is pretty well defined and brightens sharply. There’s also a really bright stellar nucleus. The galaxy lies in an interesting field: the S end of the field is teeming with 8th/9th/10th-magnitude stars from P very slightly S of the galaxy by 20’ all the way to a bright diamond of stars on the SF; the two S-most stars in the diamond are on the edge of the field when the galaxy is centered; the other two in the diamond are more inward, closer to the galaxy. Due F the galaxy by 1.5’ is a threshold star that’s very difficult to hold steady; due N of the galaxy by 5’ is a 14th-magnitude star which has a 12th-magnitude star 2.75’ NF it. F slightly N of the galaxy by 10’ is an 11th-magnitude star. SF the galaxy by 32’ is a 6.5-magnitude star.

With a public solar observation (Solar SUN-day, natch) the next after noon, Jerry called it a night, and although he wasn’t doing the event, Alan decided to pack up too. We were a bit farther from home than we would be at Eagle’s, and with the dark, winding, unfamiliar road still between me and home, discretion was the better part of recklessness. Time for one last object.

1:27
NGC 4062 (UMa): Last of the night, and the last on Chart 6; this is just on the border of UMa and Coma. It’s another elongated (P-F) spiral, quite bright, fairly diffuse and not well defined at all. It’s still pretty bright, thick, 3.25’ x 1.0’. It has a lumpy interior, like there are multiple chunks in the core, or there are extra lobes along its length; it also has a tiny, faint substellar nucleus. SP the galaxy by 5’ is an 11th-magnitude star that has F slightly N of it by 1.25’ a 13th-magnitude star. P the galaxy by 4.5’ is a 14th-magnitude star that has a 13th-magnitude star 1’ SF it; P slightly N of the galaxy by 8.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star. Due F the galaxy by 5’ is a 13th-magnitude star. F slightly N the galaxy by 21’ is a 9th-magnitude star; there’s a 10th-magnitude star 18’ N very slightly P.

The drive home was long and tricky, but not as bad as, say, the road from Champion Saddle; despite the long physical day, I was still alert when pulling into the driveway at home. As I write this, we still haven’t returned to the airport to observe, but there will definitely be a time for doing so; I suspect that once fire season is over—or as close to “over” as it gets here anymore—we’ll be back to give the airport another test run.

VI. We skipped a night to recuperate from the previous few sessions; I don’t remember if the forecast was amenable to observing or not, but it’s sometimes forgivable to stay home on a clear moonless night to save one’s energy for longer-term observing. We were now on the other side of New Moon, though, and only a few more nights remained in the April/early May observing window. Best to make use of them, given the surprising unpredictability of the weather so far in 2019.

The CSC forecast was iffy, but offered a 2-3 hour window for useful observing. When we arrived at the spur of Eagle’s Ridge (the site of best forecast), the sky was still somewhat hazy with cirrus and airplane contrails, and it would end that way as well a few hours later.

05/06-05/07/19
EAGLE’S RIDGE (spur road)
MOON: 2 days old; set at 10:26 PM (5% illuminated)
SEEING: 7, 5
TRANSPARENCY: 6, 5
SQM: 21.3
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: cirrus/contrail haze, got swamped out at end by clouds, transparency went to a 5, fell to 41˚ F
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DB, LR (Loren)

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

10:05
NGC 4150 (Com): This elliptical-looking spiral lies way above the Coma Star Cluster, right on the constellation’s border with Ursa Major and near the border with Canes Venatici. It’s round and almost looks like a planetary nebula in terms of brightness profile. It spans 1.25’ across, with a small, vaguely brighter core and an easily-visible, not-quite-stellar nucleus. The halo is pretty well defined but quite diffuse. The galaxy is the F corner of a diamond of which the brightest star is due P galaxy by 6.5’ and is 9th magnitude; SP the galaxy by 2.75’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; P very slightly N of galaxy by 3.5’ is a 14.5-magnitude star; these four stars make up the diamond. NF the galaxy by 10’ is the more-P of a pair of 12.5-magnitude stars, with the other F very slightly N by 2’.

10:15
NGC 4136 (Com): Staying very close to NGC 4150 for this very diffuse, large (2.75’), round glow. It has very very little central brightening, but does seem a bit irregular or unevenly illuminated in the halo; there’s no identifiable core and no nucleus even in averted vision. The halo is really poorly defined, and there’s no sense of “reaching the edge” of it. It’s surrounded on a number of directions by faint field stars, including a 13th-magnitude star 12’ N that has a 12.5-magnitude star 4.5’ N of it. From the galaxy NP by 10’ is a 12.5-magnitude star; SP the galaxy by 7’ is the brighter of a pair, which is 12.5 magnitude and has a 14th-magnitude star 0.5’ NP it. SF the galaxy by 9’ is another 12.5-magnitude star that has another of 14th magnitude 0.3’ S of it. Continuing on SF from the galaxy by 16’ is a 9.5-magnitude star, and S very slightly P the galaxy by 29’ is an 8th-magnitude star.

10:27
NGC 4414 (Com): Still N of the Coma Star Cluster. This galaxy is a little more impressive than the previous two. It’s very obvious, elongated 2.5’ x 1.25’ N very very slightly P-S very very slightly F. It has a very obvious core and almost-blazing bright stellar nucleus. The halo is pretty well defined but considerably diffuse, and there’s a brightening along the length that’s pretty apparent, in addition to the separate core. To the SP and NF, both by 11’, are 10th-magnitude stars with the one to NF just a bit fainter (10.5). S very slightly F of the galaxy by 12’ is an 11.5-magnitude star, and there’s a 13th-magnitude star 6.75’ due P the galaxy.

10:43
NGC 4244 (CVn): This is a really nice edge-on spiral!! it’s huge—no smaller than 12.0’ x 1.0’—and elongated SP-NF (It’s clearly a “flat” galaxy, as the criterion for such is that it has a 7:1 major axis: minor axis ratio). The fainter part of the pretty diffuse halo extends to the NF; it’s better defined along the SP. The core itself is poorly definable, and I’m not able to hold the very faint substellar nucleus in direct vision. The middle of the galaxy is hard to define because the brighter region is offset to the SP. There’s a 12th-magnitude star just inside the NF end; 2.5’ SP that star, also on the edge of the galaxy, is a 13th-magnitude star; from that star 1.75’ N very slightly P is a 14th-magnitude star; due P that star by 3’ is a 12.5-magnitude star. SP the galaxy by 10’ is the middle and brightest (12.5 magnitude) of a trio of stars aligned N-S; there’s a 13th-magnitude star 1.25’ S of the 12.5-magnitude star and a 13.5-magnitude star 0.67’ N of it. SP the galaxy by 14’ is a 9th-magnitude star with an 11th-magnitude star P it by 5’.

10:57
NGC 4214 (CVn): An odd one! This galaxy is very bright and large, kind of irregularly bright even in the core (which seems more oblong than oval).  It’s elongated NP-SF and wider at the N end, with the core offset to the SF. The galaxy subtends 3.25’ x 1.67’ (at the N end), x 1.0’ (at the S end), almost like 4489, the larger component of the Cocoon Galaxy. The core is wider around the center of the galaxy but extends SF from there, almost like a backward comma. Every now and then there’s a trace of a substellar nucleus in direct vision, but I can’t even hold it steady in averted. The halo is very very diffuse and irregularly bright and mottled. It’s in a pretty barren field; there’s not a lot there. 4.25’ S slightly F the nucleus is an 11.5-magnitude star. NP by 3.5’ is a 14th-magnitude star that has a 14.5-magnitude star 1.25’ S. NF the galaxy by 14’ is an 11.5-magnitude star. P very slightly N of the galaxy by 5’ is another of 14.5 magnitude. Due S of galaxy by 15’ is another 11.5-magnitude star, and 17’ NP the galaxy is a 12.5-magnitude star.

It was finally time to gather notes on my (honest to Crom, this time) last globular cluster visible from mid-American latitudes. Having miscalculated it a couple of times, I made damn sure now: M68 was the only globular left on the list. I can now say that I’ve seen every Messier and NGC globular my location has allowed, in addition to half of the Palomars, one Terzan, and a host of “anonymous” globulars (e.g. Arp 2, AL3, HP1, the Eridanus Cluster, etc.). No reward exists for doing so, only the satisfaction of knowing that I’ve done all that I could do with the equipment and conditions afforded me.

11:20
M68 (Hya): The last Messier/NGC globular I need from the Northern Hemisphere, but it’s way down low between some of the trees and the seeing is really poor down here. This is a nice globular but not super bright from this latitude, and not far above the mountain edge even at transit. The cluster is 3.5’ diameter, with outliers to 6.5’, and those really distant outliers are mostly to the S; there’s kind of a pentagon of brighter outliers with two to the N (NP and NF) and three more (SP, S, and SF) that are farther from the center of the globular. The cluster is very loose and granular across the face, with fifteen resolved stars in direct vision; in averted, the core really breaks up into clumpiness and granularity. CC 8/9 [10]? S very slightly P and S very slightly F are two 9.5-magnitude stars, both about 11-12’ from cluster; the star to the S very slightly P has a faint companion of 12.5 magnitude S very slightly P it by 0.5’; from the brighter of that pair 5’ P slightly S is a 10th-magnitude star; 8’ SF from the 9.5-magnitude star S slightly F the cluster is a 10th-magnitude star; NF that star by 11’ is a 9th-magnitude star. N somewhat P the cluster by 16’ is an 8.5-magnitude star.

11:40
NGC 4900 (Vir): This is an interestingly-shaped galaxy with a brightish star on the SF quadrant. It subtends 1.25’ x 1.0’ and is elongated NP-SF. The outer halo is pretty diffuse and irregularly illuminated; giving it almost a “subgranular” look (?). The core is the primary source of the visible elongation visibility. [The seeing just tightened up.] There’s definitely a stellar nucleus sometimes visible. The star on the SF quadrant is 11th magnitude and really distracting; there’s another star 3.3’ SF the nucleus, and this one is 13th magnitude. The galaxy lies almost exactly halfway between a 9th-magnitude star to the SP and a 10th-magnitude star to the NF; each by 10-11’; the 9th-magnitude star to the SP has 5.5’ P very very slightly N of it an 11th-magnitude star. An 11.5-magnitude star lies NP the galaxy by 10’. P the galaxy, a 14th and two 13th-magnitude stars form a triangle: one 13th-magnitude star is 5’ NP the galaxy; the 14th-magnitude star is SP that star by 2’; S of that star by 0.75 is the other 13th-magnitude star.

11:54
NGC 4999 (Vir): NGC 4999 is quite a bit lesser than 4900. It’s not an easy galaxy; the galaxy is very diffuse, without much central brightening; the core is not much brighter than the halo, which is indistinct and poorly defined and very diffuse. The galaxy is elongated P-F, 1.25’ x 0.75’. Every now and then there’s a glimmer of a stellar nucleus, but it’s not easy at all; there may be just off the F edge a threshold star?? [Yes.] Almost due P the galaxy by 8’ is a 10th-magnitude star which has another 10th-magnitude star due S by 7’; these two and the galaxy form a right triangle, with the star to the due P as the right-angle vertex; from that star N very slightly P by 9’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. Due F and NF the galaxy are three pairs of stars in an isosceles triangle, each pair separated by between 0.75’ and 2’; NF the galaxy by 9’ is the fainter and more P of the first pair, which is 12.3 magnitude and has an 11.5-magnitude star 1’ F slightly N; the second pair is 19’ NF the galaxy: it consists of a 10th-magnitude star which has an 11.5-magnitude star SP by 2.5’; the final pair consists of an 8.5-magnitude star which is 20’ F very slightly N of the galaxy and has an 11th-magnitude star 1’ P very slightly N of it.

It was around this point that the sky started to deteriorate on us. The seeing went first, then transparency declined across the sky in general before we could see the actual clouds sweeping in. Although the clouds began in isolation, we knew that it was the beginning of the end of observing for the night.

12:07
NGC 4845 (Vir): A very mottled, irregularly-bright edge-on spiral, elongated 2.25’ x 0.75’ P very very slightly S-F very very slightly N. The galaxy is brighter on the P end than the F (?); the central brightening is shifted that way. There’s not really a trace of a nucleus, and the core is very indistinct. The galaxy is framed in a triangle of stars: it has, 1.75’ NF where the nucleus would be, an 11.5-magnitude star; 1.25’ SF the nuclear region is a 13th-magnitude; there’s a 13.5-magnitude NP the nuclear region by 2.67’. SP the galaxy by 13’ is a 7th-magnitude star which has a 10.5-magnitude star N very slightly F it by 5.25’. N very slightly F the galaxy by 12’ is a 10th-magnitude star that’s the F-most in a wedge-shaped pattern of stars that stretch to the P and point to the F; 3.75’ due P the 10th-magnitude star is one of 12th magnitude that has 0.75’ due S of it an 11th-magnitude star; the 12th-magnitude star also has N very slightly F it by 1.25’ a 12.5-magnitude star; these four stars make up the wedge.

12:27
NGC 4904 (Vir): This galaxy is considerably fainter and smaller than most of the others tonight. It’s roundish, 1.0 across. There’s the occasional impression that the slightly-brighter core seems extended vaguely N-S; the core is fairly small but not much brighter than the halo. The halo is very diffuse, and there’s nothing in the way of a nucleus. N by 1.75’ from the center of the galaxy is an 12th-magnitude star; N very very slightly P that star by 4.25’ is an 11th-magnitude star. 4.75’ F very slightly N the galaxy is a 13.5-mag star; 6.5’ NF the galaxy is another of 13.5 magnitude. The galaxy is bracketed 25’ to N slightly P by a 7.5-magnitude star, and 21’ P slightly S of the galaxy is an 8.5-magnitude star. F very slightly S by 15’ is an 11.5-magnitude star.

12:45
NGC 4753 (Vir): We’re still in the middle of Virgo with this fine galaxy. It’s elongated P-F, 3.0’ x 1.67’, with a brighter round core region and a definite substellar nucleus that’s holdable in direct vision. The halo is, especially in its extensions, very diffuse and not well defined. P the galaxy by 4’ is a 13th-magnitude star; N very slightly F the galaxy by 3.5’ is a 12th-magnitude star that has a 14th-magnitude star P very very slightly S of it by 0.67’. P very slightly S of the galaxy by 2.5’ is a 13.5-magnitude star. N very slightly P galaxy by 17’ is a 7.5-magnitude star with an 11th-magnitude star N very slightly P it by 3.75’; from the 7.5-magnitude star almost due F by 12’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; there’s a 10.5-magnitude star P very slightly S of the 7.5-magnitude star by 7’; that star has due F it by 1.25’ a 12.5-magnitude star. 9’ F very slightly S of the galaxy is a 9.5-magnitude star that has a 10th-magnitude star N very slightly F it by 6’ and S very slightly P it by 2.75’ the brighter of a pair, which is 12.5 magnitude and has a 13th-magnitude star P very very slightly S of it by 0.5’.

This was a good target to end on; I’d mopped up the rest of the galaxies that I needed in Coma and Canes, and had only a “loop” of galaxies across the middle of Virgo remaining in that constellation. But that would have to be the agenda for a final session on this side of the Moon cycle.

VII. That final session happened two nights later at Eureka, and saw me closing out the springtime galaxy fields (save for those still waiting in Ursa Major, of course). With the Moon a concern until after midnight, I’d have just enough time to course along the “Virgo Loop,” starting from Psi Virginis, and a little bit of extra time to scan around some of the early-summer showpieces. The primary appeal of this particular night was the fact that the Eureka Ridge Clear Sky Chart showed perfect cloud-cover and transparency rankings—5/5—which hadn’t happened simultaneously since I’d been here in Eugene. The night promised epicness.

It didn’t quite deliver. The sky was cloud-free, certainly, but the transparency—while fine—wasn’t to the level of perfection that a 5/5 would indicate. But there was no time to be disappointed; there was only time for galaxies once the pesky Moon had retreated from the night. I whiled away the moonlight hours on early-summer globulars and planetaries.

05/09-05/10/19
EUREKA RIDGE
MOON: 5 days old; set at 12:33 AM (29% illuminated)
SEEING: 5
TRANSPARENCY: 7 (after midnight)
SQM: 21.4
NELM: not checked
WEATHER CONDITIONS: temps to 52 F, no breeze, no dew; transparency cleared after midnight
OTHERS PRESENT: JO, DB

All observations: 12.5″f/5 Discovery truss-tube Dobsonian, 14mm ES 82˚ eyepiece (112x, 0.7˚ TFOV) unless otherwise noted

1:09
NGC 4928 (Vir): This is certainly not one of the better ones to start with, but it’s part of the central Virgo arc that I need to follow through. The galaxy is pretty small and pretty faint as Herschels go: 0.75’ roundish with a poorly-defined halo that’s very small and tenuous; the core is slightly irregular in shape within it (and may be somewhat elongated). It seems almost like the core is irregularly illuminated, as if it’s an unusual shape. No nucleus can be seen. The core accounts for about ⅔ of the galaxy’s diameter. If the halo has any elongation, it’s so slight that the direction can’t be detected. The galaxy is surrounded by brightish stars. Due P by 9’ is a 10th-magnitude star; a 9th-magnitude star lies almost due N (maybe a tiny bit F) of the galaxy by 10’. Almost due S of the galaxy by 8.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; a 10th-magnitude star is NP the galaxy by 10’. SF the galaxy by 1.75’ is a 13.5-magnitude star; there’s a 13th-magnitude star another 1.5’ SF that star. Due F the galaxy by 4.5’ is an 11.5-magnitude star.

1:22
NGCs 4958, 4948 (Vir): This galaxy—the second in the “Virgo Loop” sequence that’s tonight’s agenda—is brighter and much larger than NGC 4928. It’s elongated S very very slightly P-N very very slightly F and spans 1.75’ x 0.67’, with a bright, obvious core and a difficult stellar nucleus that’s definite but flickering in and out. The halo is pretty well defined but its ends are indistinct. Almost due S by 10’ is a 12.5-magnitude star which has an 11.5-magnitude star 6.5’ S very slightly F and a 10.5-magnitude star S very very slightly P by the same amount; these two stars are about 4.5’ apart. SP the galaxy by 10’ is a 9th-magnitude star that has a 10.5-magnitude star P very slightly S of it by 8’ [I somehow missed 4948A between the two stars]. NGCs 4958 and 4928 are separated by 43’, with 4958 F very slightly N of 4928. NP 4958 by 14’ is another very difficult galaxy (4948). [A spinning satellite is drifting through the field very slowly.] This galaxy is exceedingly difficult to hold; I’m not doing too well at keeping it visible. It’s also really difficult to pick up anything detail-wise about it. It seems elongated NP-SF, 0.75’ x 0.25’, with almost no central brightening. A 12.5-magnitude star lies due N by 3’.

1:34
NGC 4995 (Vir): Third in the sequence, this galaxy is very much diffuse and reasonably bright. It’s mostly round, 1.75’ with a 1’ core and the barest hint of a stellar nucleus; there may be a very faint bit of P-F elongation in the halo, which is reasonably well defined. The ends of the halo are very diffuse and tenuous. The field is notable for having a couple of very bright stars leading up to the galaxy: N very very slightly P by 3.25’ is an 8th-magnitude star; a 7.5-magnitude star 8’ lies N very very slightly F the previous; the 7.5-magnitude star is the F end of an arc of three, with an 11.5-magnitude star 2.25’ P slightly N; and a 12th-magnitude star 1.5’ P the 11.5-magnitude star.

1:45
NGC 4981 (Vir): A tricky little galaxy with a 10.5-magnitude star just outside its halo on the S end. This galaxy is elongated N very slightly P-S very slightly F, 1.5’ x 0.75’, with a well-defined halo and a slightly mottled texture, especially on the N end. The small interior region is also irregular in brightness, and contains a stellar nucleus. P very slightly S the galaxy by 7’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; 8’ F very slightly S is a 13th-magnitude star that looks nebulous; it’s very hard to tell if a galaxy is there or not [in photographs there’s a galaxy S of there, but it’s too faint to have been seen]. N of the galaxy by 21’ is a 9.5-magnitude star; there’s another 9.5-magnitude star 17’ due S.

1:56
NGC 4941 (Vir): We’re still in the Virgo “loop”, at this sizable, reasonably-bright but fairly diffuse, not overly well defined inclined spiral. It’s elongated S very very slightly P-N very very slightly F, 1.75’ x 0.75’. It has a core that’s moderately brighter than the halo, and a stellar nucleus that’s occasionally visible in direct vision. S of the nucleus by 2.67’ is an 11.5-magnitude star; P that star by 2.75’ is a 13th-magnitude star. F very slightly S of the galaxy by 7.5’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. N of galaxy by 12’ is a 10.5-magnitude star. There’s an 11th-magnitude star 11’ S very very slightly F the galaxy. 10’ P very slightly S of the galaxy is an 11.5-magnitude star. 24’ N very slightly P the galaxy (so outside of the field) is the brightest star in the region at 7.5 magnitude.

2:08
NGC 4915 (Vir): Close to the end of the Virgo Loop now. This little galaxy isn’t much to write home about—it’s just a small fuzzy spot, with a well-defined, round, 0.67’ halo, a small bright core and a stellar nucleus. NF the galaxy by 6.5’ is an 11th-magnitude star; there’s an 11.5-magnitude star N very very slightly F the galaxy by 6.5’; these two stars are separated by 4.25’. 4.5’ S slightly P the galaxy is a 13th-magnitude star, and there’s a 13.5-magnitude star 5.5’ due S of the galaxy. The edges of the field are ringed by several bright stars [and a really slow satellite is in there too]: F very slightly S of the galaxy by 20’ is an 8.5-magnitude star; a 9th-magnitude star is P slightly S of the 8.5-magnitude star by 3.75’; 11’ due S of the last star is a 9.5-magnitude star. [I managed to miss NGC 4890 in the field.]

2:23
NGC 4691 (Vir): Clearing out northern half of this Virgo section. This interesting galaxy has a fairly broad halo, but the central brightening is very thin and concentrated along the major axis. The halo is 1.25’ P-F x 0.67’ N-S and poorly defined. The interior region runs the length of the major axis but is only 0.25’ thick at most. There’s an obvious stellar nucleus, but it’s not particularly bright. 5’ N of the galaxy is a 12.5-magnitude star with a 13th-magnitude star 4.5’ N very slightly P. NP the galaxy by 9’ is an 11th-magnitude star with an 11.5-magnitude star 3.75’ NP it; SP the galaxy by 11’ is another 11.5-magnitude star, and there’s a 12.5-magnitude star F slightly S of the galaxy by 7’.

2:40
NGC 4697 (Vir): The end of the Virgo Loop and the last of the northern Virgo galaxies I need. This one is a bright, large glow, 2.0’ x 1.0’ P slightly S-F slightly N, with a gradually-arrived at core that’s 0.67’ across and a stellar nucleus. The halo is pretty well defined. [The seeing just got crappy.] This is really a pretty decent galaxy. Due S by 5.5’ is a 10th-magnitude star; P that star by 3.25’ is a 12th-magnitude star. NP the galaxy by 1.5’ from the galaxy’s nucleus is a 12.5-magnitude star; there’s an 11.5-magnitude NF the galaxy by 2.75’. F very slightly S of the galaxy by 8’ is an 11.5-magnitude star that has a 9th-magnitude 1.75’ F very slightly S. N slightly F the galaxy by 23’ is a 9th-magnitude star; there’s another 9th-magnitude star P very slightly S of the galaxy by 17’ and a 9th-magnitude star SP the galaxy by 11’.

At some point during the evening, I also made a fruitless attempt to catch NGC 5128, the Centaurus A radio galaxy.

But this was the end of observing for this part of the May observing cycle; our next night out would be nineteen nights later, and would led off a much-less productive observing run—due in large part to the relative lack of targets I needed in the summer skies. I would spend much of May/June trawling elsewhere in Virgo and in Ursa Major, whittling down the lengthy list of Herschel objects littering the confines of the Great Bear. But as I drove home at the end of this particular evening, I no doubt paused to reflect on how productive the month had been, and how fortunate I was to have such dark, accessible spaces from which to explore the seas of space.